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Syntax : a generative introduction / 4th ed

Syntax : a generative introduction / 4th ed (Loan 3 times)

Material type
단행본
Personal Author
Carnie, Andrew, 1969-
Title Statement
Syntax : a generative introduction / Andrew Carnie.
판사항
4th ed.
Publication, Distribution, etc
Chichester, West Sussex, UK :   Wiley-Blackwell,   2021.  
Physical Medium
xvi, 528 p. : ill. ; 26 cm.
Series Statement
Introducing linguistics
ISBN
9781119569237 (paperback) 9781119569183 (pdf) 9781119569312 (epub)
요약
"Almost every preface to every syntax textbook out there starts out by telling the reader how different this book is from every other syntax textbook. On one hand, this is often the truth: each author shows their own particular spin or emphasis. This is certainly true of this textbook. For example, you'll be hard-pressed to find another textbook on Principles and Parameters syntax that uses as many Irish examples as this one does.. On the other hand, let's face facts. The basic material to be covered in an introductory textbook doesn't really vary much. One linguist may prefer a little more on binding theory, and a little less on control, etc. In this text, I've attempted to provide a relatively balanced presentation of most of the major issues and I've tried to do this in a student-friendly way. I've occasionally abstracted away from some of the thornier controversies, when I felt they weren't crucial to a student understanding the basics. This may make the professional syntactician feel that I've cut corners or laid out too rosy a picture. I did this on purpose, however, to give students a chance to absorb the fundamentals before challenging the issues. This was a deliberate pedagogical choice. I'm well aware that sometimes I've glossed over controversies, but I think a student has to learn the basics of how the system works before they can seriously critique and evaluate the model. This is a textbook, not a scholarly tome, so its aim is to reach as many students as possible. The style is deliberately low-key and friendly. This doesn't mean I don't want the students to challenge the material I've presented here. Throughout the book, you'll find grey "textboxes" that contain issues for further discussion or interesting tidbits. Many of the problem sets also invite the student to challenge the black and white presentation I've given in the text. I encourage instructors to assign these, and students to do them, as they form an important part of the textbook. Instructors may note that if a favorite topic is not dealt with in the body of the text, a problem set may very well treat the question."--
Bibliography, Etc. Note
Includes bibliographical references (p. [511]-519) and index.
Subject Added Entry-Topical Term
Grammar, Comparative and general --Syntax. Generative grammar.
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020 ▼a 9781119569312 (epub)
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100 1 ▼a Carnie, Andrew, ▼d 1969- ▼0 AUTH(211009)64676.
245 1 0 ▼a Syntax : ▼b a generative introduction / ▼c Andrew Carnie.
250 ▼a 4th ed.
260 ▼a Chichester, West Sussex, UK : ▼b Wiley-Blackwell, ▼c 2021.
264 1 ▼a Chichester, West Sussex, UK : ▼b Wiley-Blackwell, ▼c 2021.
300 ▼a xvi, 528 p. : ▼b ill. ; ▼c 26 cm.
336 ▼a text ▼b txt ▼2 rdacontent
337 ▼a unmediated ▼b n ▼2 rdamedia
338 ▼a volume ▼b nc ▼2 rdacarrier
490 0 ▼a Introducing linguistics
504 ▼a Includes bibliographical references (p. [511]-519) and index.
520 ▼a "Almost every preface to every syntax textbook out there starts out by telling the reader how different this book is from every other syntax textbook. On one hand, this is often the truth: each author shows their own particular spin or emphasis. This is certainly true of this textbook. For example, you'll be hard-pressed to find another textbook on Principles and Parameters syntax that uses as many Irish examples as this one does.. On the other hand, let's face facts. The basic material to be covered in an introductory textbook doesn't really vary much. One linguist may prefer a little more on binding theory, and a little less on control, etc. In this text, I've attempted to provide a relatively balanced presentation of most of the major issues and I've tried to do this in a student-friendly way. I've occasionally abstracted away from some of the thornier controversies, when I felt they weren't crucial to a student understanding the basics. This may make the professional syntactician feel that I've cut corners or laid out too rosy a picture. I did this on purpose, however, to give students a chance to absorb the fundamentals before challenging the issues. This was a deliberate pedagogical choice. I'm well aware that sometimes I've glossed over controversies, but I think a student has to learn the basics of how the system works before they can seriously critique and evaluate the model. This is a textbook, not a scholarly tome, so its aim is to reach as many students as possible. The style is deliberately low-key and friendly. This doesn't mean I don't want the students to challenge the material I've presented here. Throughout the book, you'll find grey "textboxes" that contain issues for further discussion or interesting tidbits. Many of the problem sets also invite the student to challenge the black and white presentation I've given in the text. I encourage instructors to assign these, and students to do them, as they form an important part of the textbook. Instructors may note that if a favorite topic is not dealt with in the body of the text, a problem set may very well treat the question."-- ▼c Provided by publisher.
650 0 ▼a Grammar, Comparative and general ▼x Syntax.
650 0 ▼a Generative grammar.
945 ▼a KLPA

Holdings Information

No. Location Call Number Accession No. Availability Due Date Make a Reservation Service
No. 1 Location Main Library/Western Books/ Call Number 415 C289s4 Accession No. 111852919 Availability In loan Due Date 2021-12-09 Make a Reservation Available for Reserve R Service M

Contents information

Author Introduction

앤드류 카니(지은이)

미국 University of Arizona 대학원장겸 언어학과 교수 [학력] BA (hons), University of Toronto 1991 Ph.D., MIT 1995 [저서] S yntax: A Generative Introduction 1st, 2nd ed.(2002, 2006) The Syntax Workbook: A Companion to Carnie's Syntax (2013) Formal Approaches to Celtic Linguistics (2011) Modern Syntax (2011) Constituent Structure 1st, 2nd ed.(2008, 2010) Irish Nouns: A Reference Guide (2008) Verb First (co-authored) (2005) Formal Approaches to Function: Papers in Honor of Eloise Jelinek (co-authored) (2005) The Syntax of Verb Initial Languages (co-authored) (2000)

Information Provided By: : Aladin

Table of Contents

Preface and Acknowledgments xiii


Part 1 Preliminaries 1


1 Generative Grammar 3


0. Preliminaries 3


1. Syntax as Science - the Scientific Method 4


2. Syntax as a Cognitive Science 12


3. Models of Syntax 13


4. Competence vs. Performance 13


5. A Clarification on the Word "Language" 15


6. Where Do the Rules Come From? 16


7. Choosing among Theories about Syntax 25


8. The Scientific Method and the Structure of this Textbook 25


9. Conclusion 26


Ideas, Rules, and Constraints Introduced in this Chapter 27


General Problem Sets 29


Challenge Problem Sets 35


2 Parts of Speech 43


0. Words and Why They Matter to Syntax 43


1. Determining Part of Speech 44


2. The Major Parts of Speech: N, V, Adj, and Adv 47


3. Open vs. Closed; Lexical vs. Functional 50


4. Subcategories and Features 52


5. Conclusion 58


Ideas, Rules, and Constraints Introduced in this Chapter 58


General Problem Sets 59


Challenge Problem Sets 63


3 Constituency, Trees, and Rules 67


0. Introduction 67


1. Rules and Trees 70


2. How to Draw a Tree 84


3. Modification and Ambiguity 90


4. Constituency Tests 91


5. Constituency in Other Languages 93


6. Conclusion 98


Ideas, Rules, and Constraints Introduced in this Chapter 98


General Problem Sets 99


Challenge Problem Sets 107


4 Structural Relations 113


0. Introduction 113


1. The Parts of a Tree 114


2. Dominance 116


3. Precedence 119


4. C-command 122


5. Grammatical Relations 126


6. Conclusions 129


Ideas, Rules, and Constraints Introduced in this Chapter 129


General Problem Sets 131


Challenge Problem Sets 138


5 Binding Theory 141


0. Introduction 141


1. The Notions Coindex and Antecedent 143


2. Binding 144


3. Locality Conditions on the Binding of Anaphors 146


4. The Distribution of Pronouns 148


5. The Distribution of R-expressions 148


6. Why Does Binding Theory Matter to Syntacticians 149


Conclusion 151


Ideas, Rules, and Constraints Introduced in this Chapter 151


General Problem Sets 152


Challenge Problem Sets 154


Part 2 The Base 159


6 X-bar Theory 161


0. Introduction 161


1. Bar-level Projections 163


2. Generalizing the Rules: The X-bar Schema 168


3. Complements, Adjuncts, and Specifiers 170


4. Some Definitional Housekeeping 179


5. Parameters of Word Order 180


6. Drawing Trees in X-bar Notation 182


7. Conclusion 199


Ideas, Rules, and Constraints Introduced in this Chapter 200


General Problem Sets 201


Challenge Problem Sets 209


7 Extending X-bar Theory to Functional Categories 213


0. Introduction 213


1. Determiner Phrases (DPs) 214


2. A Descriptive Tangent into Clause Types 217


3. Complementizer Phrases (CPs) 221


4. Tense, Perfect, Progressive and Voice Phrases 223


Ideas, Rules, and Constraints Introduced in this Chapter 234


General Problem Sets 236


Challenge Problem Sets 238


8 Constraining X-bar: Theta Theory 243


0. Introduction 243


1. Some Basic Terminology 244


2. Thematic Relations and Theta Roles 245


3. The Lexicon 250


4. Expletives and the Extended Projection Principle 251


5. Conclusion 253


Ideas, Rules, and Constraints Introduced in this Chapter 254


General Problem Sets 255


Challenge Problem Sets 259


9 Theta Grids and Functional Categories 265


0. Introduction 265


1. Complementizers 266


2. Determiners 269


3. Using Theta Grids for English Auxiliaries 273


4. Main verbs vs. Auxiliaries 284


5. Conclusion 287


Ideas, Rules, and Constraints Introduced in this Chapter 287


General Problem Sets 288


Challenge Problem Sets 292


Part 3 Movement 295


10 Head-to-Head Movement 297


0. Introduction 297


1. Verb Movement (V T) 300


2. T Movement (T C) 314


3. Do-support 317


Appendix: Determining if a Language has V T Movement 318


Ideas, Rules, and Constraints Introduced in this Chapter 318


General Problem Sets 319


Challenge Problem Sets 324


11 DP Movement 331


0. Introduction 331


1. A Puzzle for the Theory of Theta Roles 332


2. Passives 337


3. Case 341


4. Raising: Reprise 345


5. Passives: Reprise 347


6. Inherently Passive Verbs: Unaccusatives 348


7. DP Movement in SVO vs. VSO Languages 351


8. Conclusion 353


Ideas, Rules, and Constraints Introduced in this Chapter 353


General Problem Sets 354


Challenge Problem Sets 360


12 Wh-movement and Locality Constraints 365


0. Introduction 365


1. Movement in Wh-questions 366


2. Relative Clauses 375


3. Islands 379


4. The Minimal Link Condition 382


5. Echo Questions (Wh-in-situ) in English 386


6. Conclusion 387


Ideas, Rules, and Constraints Introduced in this Chapter 387


General Problem Sets 388


Challenge Problem Sets 392


13 A Unified Theory of Movement 395


0. Introduction 395


1. Move 397


2. Explaining Cross-linguistic Differences 400


3. Scope, Covert Movement, and the MLC 403


4. Conclusion 406


Ideas, Rules, and Constraints Introduced in this Chapter 407


General Problem Sets 407


Challenge Problem Sets 408


Part 4 Advanced Topics 411


14 Ditransitives 413


0. Introduction 413


1. The Problem of Ditransitive Verbs 414


2. The Active Voice Head 415


3. Object Shift 417


4. Ditransitives: Reprise 422


Ideas, Rules, and Constraints Introduced in this Chapter 426


General Problem Sets 426


Challenge Problem Sets 428


15 Raising, Control, and Empty Categories 429


0. Introduction 429


1. Raising vs. Control 430


2. Two Kinds of Raising, Two Kinds of Control 438


3. Control Theory 443


4. Another Kind of Null Subject: "Little" pro 446


5. Conclusion 447


Ideas, Rules, and Constraints Introduced in this Chapter 447


General Problem Sets 448


Challenge Problem Sets 450


16 Ellipsis 453


0. Ellipsis 453


1. LF-copying or PF-deletion 455


2. Antecedent-Contained Deletion and Pseudogapping 461


3. Conclusion 464


Ideas, Rules, and Constraints Introduced in this Chapter 464


General Problem Sets 466


Challenge Problem Sets 468


17 Advanced Topics in Binding Theory 471


0. Introduction 471


1. Levels of Representation 472


2. The Definition of Binding Domain 473


Ideas, Rules, and Constraints Introduced in this Chapter 479


General Problem Sets 479


Challenge Problem Sets 481


18 Polysynthesis, Incorporation, and Non-configurationality 483


0. Introduction 483


1. Polysynthesis 484


2. Incorporation 486


3. Scrambling and Non-configurationality 487


4. Conclusion 495


Ideas, Rules, and Constraints Introduced in this Chapter 495


General Problem Sets 496


Challenge Problem Sets 497


19 Merge 499


0. Introduction 499


1. External Merge 500


2. Internal Merge 505


3. Conclusion 506


Ideas, Rules, and Constraints Introduced in this Chapter 507


General Problem Sets 507


Challenge Problem Sets 508


Conclusions and Directions for Further Study 509


References 511


Index 521

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