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Promoting, assessing, recognizing and certifying lifelong learning [electronic resource] : international perspectives and practices

Promoting, assessing, recognizing and certifying lifelong learning [electronic resource] : international perspectives and practices

Material type
E-Book(소장)
Personal Author
Halttunen, Timo. Koivisto, Mari. Billett, Stephen.
Title Statement
Promoting, assessing, recognizing and certifying lifelong learning [electronic resource] : international perspectives and practices / Timo Halttunen, Mari Koivisto, Stephen Billett, editors.
Publication, Distribution, etc
Dordrecht :   Springer Netherlands :   Imprint: Springer,   2014.  
Physical Medium
1 online resource (xiv, 302 p.).
Series Statement
Lifelong learning book series ;volume 20
ISBN
9789401786942
요약
This book offers an international perspective on the growing interest worldwide in lifelong learning, particularly as it relates to learning beyond compulsory education and initial occupational preparation: across working life. Much of this interest is driven by key social and economic imperatives associated with the changing requirements of work and working life, the transformation of many occupations and lengthening working lives. The concerns in lifelong learning are also associated with individuals being able to engage in learning about cultural and social topics and practices that they had not so far. It is important to understand how this learning can be assessed, recognized and certified. Many in workforces across the world learn much of the knowledge that is required to maintain their employability through that work. Yet, that learning and that competency remains without recognition and certification while this could be particularly helpful for individuals seeking to sustain their employability or to extend their work into new occupations or workplaces. The first section of this book sets out the overall project and outlines the key concepts and issues. It illustrates why there is a need for promoting and recognizing lifelong learning and explains some of the terminology, concepts and key considerations. The second section informs about a range of policies and practices that are currently being deployed or have been deployed across a range of countries within Europe, Scandinavia and Asia. The last section comprises of contributions emphasizing the ways in which the assessment of workers learning takes place in different occupational contexts and different cultural contexts. The final chapter outlines how a systemic approach to recognizing lifelong learning might progress for a country which is promoting a continuing education and training system largely outside of tertiary education institutions.
General Note
Title from e-Book title page.  
Content Notes
Preface -- Acknowledgements -- Section 1: Promoting and recognising lifelong learning: Key concepts, practices and emerging and perennial problems -- Chapter 1: Promoting and recognising lifelong learning: Introduction; Timo Halttunen and Mari Koivisto (University of Turku, Finland), and Stephen Billett (Griffith University, Australia) -- Chapter 2 : Conceptualising lifelong learning and its recognition in contemporary times; Stephen Billett (Griffith University, Australia -- Chapter 3: New skills for new jobs: Work agency as a necessary condition for successful lifelong learning; Christian Harteis and Michael Goller (University of Paderborn, Germany) -- Section 2: Promoting lifelong learning for economic, social and cultural purposes -- Chapter 4: Evaluating informal learning in the workplace; Karen E. Watkins (The University of Georgia, USA), Victoria J. Marsick (Columbia University, USA) and Miren Fernández de Álava (Autonomous University of Barcelona, Spain) -- Chapter 5: Recognising learning and development in the transaction of personal work practices; Raymond Smith (Griffith University, Australia) -- Chapter 6: Understanding work-related learning: The role of job characteristics and the use of different sources of learning; David Gijbels, Vincent Donche and Piet Van den Bossche (University of Antwerp, Belgium), and Ingrid Ilsbroux and Eva Sammels (University of Leuven, Belgium) -- Chapter 7: Experiential learning: A new higher education requiring new pedagogic skills; Anita Walsh (University of London, UK) -- Chapter 8: How expertise is created in emerging professional fields: Tuire Palonen and Erno Lehtinen (University of Turku, Finland), and Henny P. A. Boshuizen (Open Universiteit in the Netherlands) -- Chapter 9: Continuing education and training at work; Sarojni Choy, Ray Smith and Ann Kelly (Griffith University, Australia) -- Chapter 10: Lifelong learning policies and practices in Singapore: Tensions and challenges; Helen Bound, Magdalene Lin and Peter Rushbrook (Institute for Adult Learning, Singapore) -- Section 3: Recognising and certifying lifelong learning: Policies and practices -- Chapter 11: Professionalisation of supervisors and RPL; Timo Halttunen and Mari Koivisto (University of Turku, Finland) -- Chapter 12: Securing assessors’ professionalism: Meeting assessor requirements for the purpose of performing high-quality (RPL) assessments; Antoinette van Berkel (Amsterdam University of Applied Sciences, the Netherlands) -- Chapter 13: Problems and possibilities in recognition of prior learning: A critical social theory perspective; Fredrik Sandberg (Linköping University, Sweden) -- Chapter 14: Changing RPL & HRD discourses: practitioner perspectives; Anne Murphy (Dublin Institute of Technology, Ireland), Oran Doherty (Letterkenny Institute of Technology, Ireland), and Kate Collins (University College Dublin, Ireland) -- Chapter 15: French approaches to Accreditation of Prior Learning: practices and research; Vanessa Remery (University of Geneva, Switzerland) and Vincent Merle (Conservatoire national des arts et métiers, CNAM, France) -- Chapter 16: Recognising and certifying workers’ knowledge: Policies, frameworks and practices in prospect: Perspectives from two countries; Stephen Billett (Griffith University, Australia) and Helen Bound and Magdalene Lin (Institute for Adult Learning, Singapore) -- Index.
Bibliography, Etc. Note
Includes bibliographical references and index.
이용가능한 다른형태자료
Issued also as a book.  
Subject Added Entry-Topical Term
Continuing education --Social aspects --Cross-cultural studies. Vocational education --Cross-cultural studies. Employees --Training of --Cross-cultural studies. Recognition of prior learning --Cross-cultural studies.
Short cut
URL
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245 0 0 ▼a Promoting, assessing, recognizing and certifying lifelong learning ▼h [electronic resource] : ▼b international perspectives and practices / ▼c Timo Halttunen, Mari Koivisto, Stephen Billett, editors.
260 ▼a Dordrecht : ▼b Springer Netherlands : ▼b Imprint: Springer, ▼c 2014.
300 ▼a 1 online resource (xiv, 302 p.).
336 ▼a text ▼b txt ▼2 rdacontent
337 ▼a computer ▼b c ▼2 rdamedia
338 ▼a online resource ▼b cr ▼2 rdacarrier
490 1 ▼a Lifelong learning book series ; ▼v volume 20
500 ▼a Title from e-Book title page.
504 ▼a Includes bibliographical references and index.
505 0 ▼a Preface -- Acknowledgements -- Section 1: Promoting and recognising lifelong learning: Key concepts, practices and emerging and perennial problems -- Chapter 1: Promoting and recognising lifelong learning: Introduction; Timo Halttunen and Mari Koivisto (University of Turku, Finland), and Stephen Billett (Griffith University, Australia) -- Chapter 2 : Conceptualising lifelong learning and its recognition in contemporary times; Stephen Billett (Griffith University, Australia -- Chapter 3: New skills for new jobs: Work agency as a necessary condition for successful lifelong learning; Christian Harteis and Michael Goller (University of Paderborn, Germany) -- Section 2: Promoting lifelong learning for economic, social and cultural purposes -- Chapter 4: Evaluating informal learning in the workplace; Karen E. Watkins (The University of Georgia, USA), Victoria J. Marsick (Columbia University, USA) and Miren Fernández de Álava (Autonomous University of Barcelona, Spain) -- Chapter 5: Recognising learning and development in the transaction of personal work practices; Raymond Smith (Griffith University, Australia) -- Chapter 6: Understanding work-related learning: The role of job characteristics and the use of different sources of learning; David Gijbels, Vincent Donche and Piet Van den Bossche (University of Antwerp, Belgium), and Ingrid Ilsbroux and Eva Sammels (University of Leuven, Belgium) -- Chapter 7: Experiential learning: A new higher education requiring new pedagogic skills; Anita Walsh (University of London, UK) -- Chapter 8: How expertise is created in emerging professional fields: Tuire Palonen and Erno Lehtinen (University of Turku, Finland), and Henny P. A. Boshuizen (Open Universiteit in the Netherlands) -- Chapter 9: Continuing education and training at work; Sarojni Choy, Ray Smith and Ann Kelly (Griffith University, Australia) -- Chapter 10: Lifelong learning policies and practices in Singapore: Tensions and challenges; Helen Bound, Magdalene Lin and Peter Rushbrook (Institute for Adult Learning, Singapore) -- Section 3: Recognising and certifying lifelong learning: Policies and practices -- Chapter 11: Professionalisation of supervisors and RPL; Timo Halttunen and Mari Koivisto (University of Turku, Finland) -- Chapter 12: Securing assessors’ professionalism: Meeting assessor requirements for the purpose of performing high-quality (RPL) assessments; Antoinette van Berkel (Amsterdam University of Applied Sciences, the Netherlands) -- Chapter 13: Problems and possibilities in recognition of prior learning: A critical social theory perspective; Fredrik Sandberg (Linköping University, Sweden) -- Chapter 14: Changing RPL & HRD discourses: practitioner perspectives; Anne Murphy (Dublin Institute of Technology, Ireland), Oran Doherty (Letterkenny Institute of Technology, Ireland), and Kate Collins (University College Dublin, Ireland) -- Chapter 15: French approaches to Accreditation of Prior Learning: practices and research; Vanessa Remery (University of Geneva, Switzerland) and Vincent Merle (Conservatoire national des arts et métiers, CNAM, France) -- Chapter 16: Recognising and certifying workers’ knowledge: Policies, frameworks and practices in prospect: Perspectives from two countries; Stephen Billett (Griffith University, Australia) and Helen Bound and Magdalene Lin (Institute for Adult Learning, Singapore) -- Index.
520 ▼a This book offers an international perspective on the growing interest worldwide in lifelong learning, particularly as it relates to learning beyond compulsory education and initial occupational preparation: across working life. Much of this interest is driven by key social and economic imperatives associated with the changing requirements of work and working life, the transformation of many occupations and lengthening working lives. The concerns in lifelong learning are also associated with individuals being able to engage in learning about cultural and social topics and practices that they had not so far. It is important to understand how this learning can be assessed, recognized and certified. Many in workforces across the world learn much of the knowledge that is required to maintain their employability through that work. Yet, that learning and that competency remains without recognition and certification while this could be particularly helpful for individuals seeking to sustain their employability or to extend their work into new occupations or workplaces. The first section of this book sets out the overall project and outlines the key concepts and issues. It illustrates why there is a need for promoting and recognizing lifelong learning and explains some of the terminology, concepts and key considerations. The second section informs about a range of policies and practices that are currently being deployed or have been deployed across a range of countries within Europe, Scandinavia and Asia. The last section comprises of contributions emphasizing the ways in which the assessment of workers learning takes place in different occupational contexts and different cultural contexts. The final chapter outlines how a systemic approach to recognizing lifelong learning might progress for a country which is promoting a continuing education and training system largely outside of tertiary education institutions.
530 ▼a Issued also as a book.
538 ▼a Mode of access: World Wide Web.
650 0 ▼a Continuing education ▼x Social aspects ▼v Cross-cultural studies.
650 0 ▼a Vocational education ▼v Cross-cultural studies.
650 0 ▼a Employees ▼x Training of ▼v Cross-cultural studies.
650 0 ▼a Recognition of prior learning ▼v Cross-cultural studies.
700 1 ▼a Halttunen, Timo.
700 1 ▼a Koivisto, Mari.
700 1 ▼a Billett, Stephen.
830 0 ▼a Lifelong learning book series ; ▼v 20.
856 4 0 ▼u https://oca.korea.ac.kr/link.n2s?url=http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/978-94-017-8694-2
945 ▼a KLPA
991 ▼a E-Book(소장)

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