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Principles of memory [electronic resource]

Principles of memory [electronic resource]

Material type
E-Book(소장)
Personal Author
Surprenant, Aimée M. Neath, Ian.
Title Statement
Principles of memory [electronic resource] / Aimée M. Surprenant and Ian Neath.
Publication, Distribution, etc
New York :   Psychology Press,   c2009.  
Physical Medium
1 online resource (ix, 191 p.).
Series Statement
Essays in Cognitive Psychology
ISBN
9781136950643 (electronic bk.) 1136950648 (electronic bk.)
요약
In over 100 years of scientific research on human memory, and nearly 50 years after the so-called cognitive revolution, we have nothing that really constitutes a widely accepted and frequently cited law of memory, and perhaps only one generally accepted principle. The purpose of this monograph is to begin to rectify this situation by proposing 7 principles of human memory that apply to all memory. These principles are qualitative statements of empirical regularities that can serve as intermediary explanations and which follow from viewing memory as a function. They apply to all types of inf.
General Note
Title from e-Book title page.  
Chapter 7 The Impurity Principle.  
Content Notes
Cover; principles of memory; Title Page; Copyright Page; Table of Contents; Acknowledgments; Chapter 1 Introduction; 1.1 Principles of Memory; 1.2 Laws, Principles, and Effects; 1.3 What Is a Principle?; 1.4 Seven Principles of Memory; Chapter 2 Systems or Process?; 2.1 Systems or Process?; 2.2 The Systems View; 2.2.1 The Five Memory Systems; 2.2.1.1 Procedural Memory; 2.2.1.2 Perceptual Representation System; 2.2.1.3 Semantic Memory; 2.2.1.4 Working Memory; 2.2.1.5 Episodic Memory; 2.2.2 Critique of the Systems View; 2.2.2.1 Number of Memory Systems; 2.2.2.2 Dissociations.
이용가능한 다른형태자료
Issued also as a book.  
Subject Added Entry-Topical Term
Memory.
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URL
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020 ▼a 9781136950643 (electronic bk.)
020 ▼a 1136950648 (electronic bk.)
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082 0 0 ▼a 153.12 ▼2 23
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100 1 ▼a Surprenant, Aimée M.
245 1 0 ▼a Principles of memory ▼h [electronic resource] / ▼c Aimée M. Surprenant and Ian Neath.
260 ▼a New York : ▼b Psychology Press, ▼c c2009.
300 ▼a 1 online resource (ix, 191 p.).
490 1 ▼a Essays in Cognitive Psychology
500 ▼a Title from e-Book title page.
500 ▼a Chapter 7 The Impurity Principle.
505 0 ▼a Cover; principles of memory; Title Page; Copyright Page; Table of Contents; Acknowledgments; Chapter 1 Introduction; 1.1 Principles of Memory; 1.2 Laws, Principles, and Effects; 1.3 What Is a Principle?; 1.4 Seven Principles of Memory; Chapter 2 Systems or Process?; 2.1 Systems or Process?; 2.2 The Systems View; 2.2.1 The Five Memory Systems; 2.2.1.1 Procedural Memory; 2.2.1.2 Perceptual Representation System; 2.2.1.3 Semantic Memory; 2.2.1.4 Working Memory; 2.2.1.5 Episodic Memory; 2.2.2 Critique of the Systems View; 2.2.2.1 Number of Memory Systems; 2.2.2.2 Dissociations.
505 8 ▼a 2.2.2.3 Life Span Development2.2.3 Summary of the Systems View; 2.3 The Processing View; 2.3.1 Types of Processing; 2.3.1.1 Levels of Processing; 2.3.1.2 Transfer-Appropriate Processing; 2.3.1.3 Components of Processing; 2.3.2 Critique of the Processing View; 2.3.2.1 Proliferation of Processes; 2.3.2.2 Testability; 2.3.2.3 Amnesia; 2.3.3 Summary of the Processing View; 2.4 Chapter Summary; Chapter 3 The Cue-Driven Principle; 3.1 Principle 1: The Cue-Driven Principle; 3.2 Memory Without Cues; 3.3 Evidence for Cues; 3.3.1 Redintegrative Effects; 3.3.2 Cueing Effects.
505 8 ▼a 3.3.3 Proactive Interference3.3.4 Possible Exceptions; 3.4 Chapter Summary; Chapter 4 The Encoding-Retrieval Principle; 4.1 Principle 2: The Encoding-Retrieval Principle; 4.2 Encoding Specificity; 4.3 Transfer-Appropriate-Not Similar-Processing; 4.3.1 The Irrelevance of Match: Theoretical Example; 4.3.2 The Irrelevance of Match: Empirical Example; 4.4 Implications of Principle 2; 4.4.1 Corollary A: Items Do Not Have Intrinsic Mnemonic Properties; 4.4.2 Corollary B: Processes Do Not Have Intrinsic Mnemonic Properties; 4.4.3 Corollary C: Cues Do Not Have Intrinsic Mnemonic Properties.
505 8 ▼a 4.4.4 Corollary D: Forgetting Must Be due to Extrinsic Factors4.4.4.1 Forgetting in Sensory Memory; 4.4.4.2 Forgetting in Short-Term/Working Memory; 4.4.4.3 Forgetting due to the Passage of Time; 4.5 Chapter Summary; Chapter 5 The Cue Overload Principle; 5.1 Principle 3: The Cue Overload Principle; 5.2 Explanatory Power; 5.2.1 Buildup of and Release From Proactive Interference; 5.2.2 List Length Effect; 5.2.3 The Fan Effect; 5.2.4 Levels of Processing; 5.3 Objections to Cue Overload; 5.3.1 Violation of the Encoding-Retrieval Principle; 5.3.2 Relevance of Cue Overload; 5.4 Chapter Summary.
505 8 ▼a Chapter 6 The Reconstruction Principle6.1 Principle 4: The Reconstruction Principle; 6.2 Classic Demonstrations; 6.3 The Misinformation Effect; 6.4 Reconstruction in Semantic Memory; 6.5 Reality Monitoring; 6.6 Deese/Roediger/McDermott Procedure; 6.7 Recognition Without Identification; 6.8 Reconstruction in Immediate Memory; 6.8.1 Redintegration; 6.8.2 Regularization of Errors; 6.8.3 Building a DOG from a DART, a MOP, and a FIG; 6.8.4 False Memory in Short-Term/Working Memory Tasks; 6.9 Reconstruction in Very Short-Term Memory; 6.10 Reconstruction in Iconic Memory; 6.11 Chapter Summary.
520 ▼a In over 100 years of scientific research on human memory, and nearly 50 years after the so-called cognitive revolution, we have nothing that really constitutes a widely accepted and frequently cited law of memory, and perhaps only one generally accepted principle. The purpose of this monograph is to begin to rectify this situation by proposing 7 principles of human memory that apply to all memory. These principles are qualitative statements of empirical regularities that can serve as intermediary explanations and which follow from viewing memory as a function. They apply to all types of inf.
530 ▼a Issued also as a book.
538 ▼a Mode of access: World Wide Web.
650 0 ▼a Memory.
700 1 ▼a Neath, Ian.
830 0 ▼a Essays in cognitive psychology.
856 4 0 ▼u https://oca.korea.ac.kr/link.n2s?url=http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&scope=site&db=nlebk&AN=547702
945 ▼a KLPA
991 ▼a E-Book(소장)

Holdings Information

No. Location Call Number Accession No. Availability Due Date Make a Reservation Service
No. 1 Location Main Library/e-Book Collection/ Call Number CR 153.12 Accession No. E14007311 Availability Loan can not(reference room) Due Date Make a Reservation Service M

Contents information

Table of Contents

Cover -- principles of memory -- Title Page -- Copyright Page -- Table of Contents -- Acknowledgments -- Chapter 1 Introduction -- 1.1 Principles of Memory -- 1.2 Laws, Principles, and Effects -- 1.3 What Is a Principle? -- 1.4 Seven Principles of Memory -- Chapter 2 Systems or Process? -- 2.1 Systems or Process? -- 2.2 The Systems View -- 2.2.1 The Five Memory Systems -- 2.2.1.1 Procedural Memory -- 2.2.1.2 Perceptual Representation System -- 2.2.1.3 Semantic Memory -- 2.2.1.4 Working Memory -- 2.2.1.5 Episodic Memory -- 2.2.2 Critique of the Systems View -- 2.2.2.1 Number of Memory Systems -- 2.2.2.2 Dissociations -- 2.2.2.3 Life Span Development -- 2.2.3 Summary of the Systems View -- 2.3 The Processing View -- 2.3.1 Types of Processing -- 2.3.1.1 Levels of Processing -- 2.3.1.2 Transfer-Appropriate Processing -- 2.3.1.3 Components of Processing -- 2.3.2 Critique of the Processing View -- 2.3.2.1 Proliferation of Processes -- 2.3.2.2 Testability -- 2.3.2.3 Amnesia -- 2.3.3 Summary of the Processing View -- 2.4 Chapter Summary -- Chapter 3 The Cue-Driven Principle -- 3.1 Principle 1: The Cue-Driven Principle -- 3.2 Memory Without Cues -- 3.3 Evidence for Cues -- 3.3.1 Redintegrative Effects -- 3.3.2 Cueing Effects -- 3.3.3 Proactive Interference -- 3.3.4 Possible Exceptions -- 3.4 Chapter Summary -- Chapter 4 The Encoding–Retrieval Principle -- 4.1 Principle 2: The Encoding–Retrieval Principle -- 4.2 Encoding Specificity -- 4.3 Transfer-Appropriate—Not Similar—Processing -- 4.3.1 The Irrelevance of Match: Theoretical Example -- 4.3.2 The Irrelevance of Match: Empirical Example -- 4.4 Implications of Principle 2 -- 4.4.1 Corollary A: Items Do Not Have Intrinsic Mnemonic Properties -- 4.4.2 Corollary B: Processes Do Not Have Intrinsic Mnemonic Properties -- 4.4.3 Corollary C: Cues Do Not Have Intrinsic Mnemonic Properties -- 4.4.4 Corollary D: Forgetting Must Be due to Extrinsic Factors -- 4.4.4.1 Forgetting in Sensory Memory -- 4.4.4.2 Forgetting in Short-Term/Working Memory -- 4.4.4.3 Forgetting due to the Passage of Time -- 4.5 Chapter Summary -- Chapter 5 The Cue Overload Principle -- 5.1 Principle 3: The Cue Overload Principle -- 5.2 Explanatory Power -- 5.2.1 Buildup of and Release From Proactive Interference -- 5.2.2 List Length Effect -- 5.2.3 The Fan Effect -- 5.2.4 Levels of Processing -- 5.3 Objections to Cue Overload -- 5.3.1 Violation of the Encoding–Retrieval Principle -- 5.3.2 Relevance of Cue Overload -- 5.4 Chapter Summary -- Chapter 6 The Reconstruction Principle -- 6.1 Principle 4: The Reconstruction Principle -- 6.2 Classic Demonstrations -- 6.3 The Misinformation Effect -- 6.4 Reconstruction in Semantic Memory -- 6.5 Reality Monitoring -- 6.6 Deese/Roediger/McDermott Procedure -- 6.7 Recognition Without Identification -- 6.8 Reconstruction in Immediate Memory -- 6.8.1 Redintegration -- 6.8.2 Regularization of Errors -- 6.8.3 Building a DOG from a DART, a MOP, and a FIG -- 6.8.4 False Memory in Short-Term/Working Memory Tasks -- 6.9 Reconstruction in Very Short-Term Memory -- 6.10 Reconstruction in Iconic Memory -- 6.11 Chapter Summary -- Chapter 7 The Impurity Principle -- 7.1 Principle 5: The Impurity Principle -- 7.2 Tasks and Processes -- 7.3 Task Purity -- 7.3.1 Implicit Versus Explicit -- 7.3.2 Episodic Versus Semantic -- 7.3.3 STM (and WM) Versus LTM -- 7.4 Process Purity -- 7.4.1 Process Dissociation -- 7.4.2 Processes and Subprocesses -- 7.5 Subtractive Logic in Neuroimaging -- 7.6 Chapter Summary -- Chapter 8 The Relative Distinctiveness Principle -- 8.1 Principle 6: The Relative Distinctiveness Principle -- 8.2 The Von Restorff Effect -- 8.3 Distinctiveness in Short-Term/Working Memory -- 8.4 Instantiating the Principle -- 8.4.1 SIMPLE and Absolute Identification -- 8.4.2 SIMPLE and Free Recall -- 8.4.3 SIMPLE and the von Restorff Isolation Effect -- 8.4.4 SIMPLE and Serial Recall -- 8.5 Distinctiveness in Sensory Memory -- 8.6 Distinctiveness in Semantic Memory -- 8.7 Distinctiveness in Implicit Memory -- 8.8 Underlying Dimensions -- 8.9 Chapter Summary -- Chapter 9 The Specificity Principle -- 9.1 Principle 7: The Specificity Principle -- 9.2 Levels of Representation -- 9.3 External Support Versus Specificity -- 9.3.1 Indirect Memory and Specificity -- 9.3.2 Encoding Specificity -- 9.3.3 Gist-Based Versus Item-Based Processing -- 9.4 Specificity in Amnesia -- 9.5 Proper Names -- 9.6 Chapter Summary -- Chapter 10 Evaluation, Limitations, and Implications -- 10.1 Principles of Memory -- 10.2 Relation to Other Sets of Principles -- 10.2.1 Kihlstrom and Barnhardt’s Principles -- 10.2.2 Crowder’s Four Principles -- 10.2.3 Principles of Short-Term Memory -- 10.2.4 Seven Sins of Memory -- 10.2.5 Semon’s Principles -- 10.2.6 Principles of Cognition -- 10.3 Relation to Laws of Memory -- 10.3.1 Cohen’s Laws -- 10.3.2 Tulving–Wiseman Law -- 10.3.3 Roediger’s Laws -- 10.3.4 Ribot’s Law -- 10.3.5 Jost’s Laws -- 10.3.6 Aristotle’s Laws of Association -- 10.4 Possible Principles -- 10.5 Evaluation -- 10.5.1 Possible Weaknesses -- 10.5.2 Conclusions -- References -- Author Index -- Subject Index -- .

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