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Conference interpreting [electronic resource] : a trainer's guide

Conference interpreting [electronic resource] : a trainer's guide

자료유형
E-Book(소장)
개인저자
Setton, Robin. Dawrant, Andrew.
서명 / 저자사항
Conference interpreting [electronic resource] : a trainer's guide / Robin Setton, Andrew Dawrant.
발행사항
Amsterdam ;   Philadelphia :   John Benjamins Publishing Company,   c2016.  
형태사항
1 online resource (xxxiv, 650 p.).
총서사항
Benjamins translation library,0929-7316 ; 121
ISBN
9789027267566 (pdf) 9027267561 (pdf) 9789027258632 (hb ; alk. paper)
일반주기
Title from e-Book title page.  
서지주기
Includes bibliographical references and index.
이용가능한 다른형태자료
Issued also as a book.  
일반주제명
Congresses and conventions --Translating services. Translating services --Handbooks, manuals, etc. Translating and interpreting --Handbooks, manuals, etc.
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490 1 ▼a Benjamins translation library, ▼x 0929-7316 ; ▼v 121
500 ▼a Title from e-Book title page.
504 ▼a Includes bibliographical references and index.
530 ▼a Issued also as a book.
538 ▼a Mode of access: World Wide Web.
650 0 ▼a Congresses and conventions ▼x Translating services.
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소장정보

No. 소장처 청구기호 등록번호 도서상태 반납예정일 예약 서비스
No. 1 소장처 중앙도서관/e-Book 컬렉션/ 청구기호 CR 418.02071 등록번호 E14007045 도서상태 대출불가(열람가능) 반납예정일 예약 서비스 M

컨텐츠정보

목차

Intro -- Conference Interpreting A Trainer’s Guide -- Editorial page -- Title page -- LCC data -- Authors’ bios -- Table of contents -- List of tables and figures -- Abbreviations -- General introduction -- Acknowledgements -- 1. Introduction to the Trainer’s Guide -- Professionalism: the devil is in the detail -- Revisiting testing and certification -- Theory and research -- 2. Teaching conference interpreting -- 2.1 Introduction -- 2.1.1 Overview -- 2.1.2 Key pedagogical principles and rationale -- 2.2 What makes a good instructor? -- 2.2.1 Pedagogical and class management skills -- 2.2.2 Feedback and demonstration expertise -- 2.2.3 Human qualities -- 2.2.4 Theoretical knowledge -- 2.2.5 Training the trainers -- 2.2.6 Postgraduate teaching assistants (TAs) -- 2.2.7 Other auxiliary instructors -- 2.2.8 Pedagogical coordination and cohesion -- 2.3 The student’s experience -- 2.3.1 Morale and motivation -- 2.3.2 The learning curve -- 2.4 Class design and configurations -- 2.4.1 Types of class configuration -- 2.4.2 Class size, composition and duration -- 2.4.3 Diversity and class participation -- 2.4.4 Language combination of instructors -- 2.4.5 Team- or assisted teaching and ‘triangular’ classes -- 2.5 The interpreting skills classroom -- 2.5.1 Student-centred learning -- 2.5.2 Putting yourself in the student’s place -- 2.5.3 Learning what and learning how -- 2.5.4 Teaching methods and classroom procedures -- 2.5.5 Choosing the right materials -- 2.5.5.1 Progression in materials -- 2.5.5.2 Assessing speech difficulty -- 2.5.5.3 Finding authentic speeches and maintaining a speech bank -- 2.5.6 Topic and event preparation and brainstorming -- 2.5.7 Student performance and discussion -- 2.5.7.1 Taking turns and class involvement -- 2.5.7.2 Discussion: staying focused -- 2.5.8 Feedback -- 2.5.8.1 General principles -- 2.5.8.2 Follow-up: stand-back vs. hands-on pedagogy -- 2.5.9 Explanations, theory, metaphors and models -- 2.5.10 Agreeing on terms -- 2.5.11 Instructor demonstrations -- 2.5.12 Combining teaching modes -- 2.6 Expertise and deliberate practice -- 2.6.1 Expert performance research -- 2.6.2 Deliberate practice -- 2.6.3 Private study and deliberate practice -- 2.7 Summary -- Appendix A -- 3. Curriculum and progression -- 3.1 Introduction -- 3.2 Revisiting the standard training paradigm -- 3.2.1 Origins: instinct and apprenticeship -- 3.2.2 The call for a scientific basis for training -- 3.2.3 Component-skills approaches -- 3.2.3.1 Component skills (part-task) vs. holistic training -- 3.2.3.2 Task analysis: models of interpreting -- 3.2.3.3 What kind of task is interpreting? -- 3.2.3.4 Conditions for effective part-task training -- 3.2.3.5 Incremental realism and motivation -- 3.2.4 What can be taught and how? -- 3.2.4.1 Teaching interpreting ‘strategies’ -- 3.2.4.2 Bridging the declarative-procedural gap -- 3.2.5 Apprenticeship, scientific teaching and student-focused learning -- 3.2.6 Individual variability and flexibility -- 3.3 Curric.
ulum design -- 3.3.1 Curriculum components -- 3.3.2 Progression: steps to expertise -- 3.3.3 Cross-cutting skills -- 3.3.4 Bridging theory and practice -- 3.3.5 Course duration and staging -- 3.3.5.1 Why Consecutive and Sight Translation before SI? -- 3.3.5.2 Sight translation -- 3.3.5.3 Working first into A, then into B -- 3.3.6 Curriculum flexibility -- 3.4 In-course assessment -- 3.4.1 The Midpoint Exam: selection for SI training -- 3.4.1.1 Rationale, criteria and procedure -- 3.4.1.2 Test items -- 3.4.1.3 Midpoint assessment criteria -- 3.4.2 Assessment through the course: progression of constructs and criteria -- 3.4.3 Other forms of in-course assessment -- 3.4.3.1 Self- and peer-assessment -- 3.4.3.2 Student portfolios and journals -- 3.5 Pedagogy and curriculum: updating the apprenticeship model -- 3.5.1 Existing weaknesses -- 3.5.2 Summary of recommendations -- Further reading -- 4. Selection and admission -- 4.1 Introduction -- 4.2 Defining standards for admission -- 4.2.1 Language proficiency -- 4.2.2 The profile of a promising trainee: other criteria -- 4.3 Entrance examinations -- 4.3.1 General procedure and pre-screening -- 4.3.2 The written exam -- 4.3.2.1 Standardly scorable tests -- 4.3.2.2 Performance tests -- 4.3.2.3 Choice of tests and grading: the decision tree -- 4.3.3 Oral test and interview -- 4.3.3.1 Panel composition and qualifications -- 4.3.3.2 Guidelines for speeches -- 4.3.3.3 Live speech vs. video -- 4.3.3.4 Rater training and preparation -- 4.3.3.5 Oral exam procedure -- 4.3.3.6 Adapting or varying test procedure (on the fly) -- 4.3.4 Assessment, grading and deliberations -- 4.3.4.1 Scoring procedure -- 4.3.4.2 What to look for -- 4.3.4.3 Final selection -- 4.3.5 Candidate profiles -- 4.3.6 Admission exams and pedagogy -- 4.4 Research on aptitude testing: criticisms and solutions -- 4.4.1 Consensus and best practices -- 4.4.2 Criticisms of the traditional aptitude test -- 4.4.3 The search for (more) objectivity -- 4.4.3.1 An early experiment with psychometric testing -- 4.4.3.2 Staggered or extended selection procedures -- 4.4.4 Aptitude testing in practice - the challenge of feasibility -- 4.5 Summary and recommendations -- Further reading -- Appendix A -- Appendix B -- Appendix C -- 5. Initiation to interpreting -- 5.1 Introduction -- 5.2 Active Listening exercises -- 5.2.1 Idiomatic Gist -- 5.2.2 Listening Cloze -- 5.2.3 Discourse Modelling and Outlining -- 5.3 Concision and compression -- 5.4 Deverbalization and interference-busting -- 5.5 First steps in real interpreting -- 5.5.1 Short Consecutive without notes -- 5.5.2 Role and mediation: impartiality and fidelity -- 5.6 Public Speaking and Delivery Skills -- 5.7 Initiation: pedagogical notes -- 5.8 The learning curve: a novelty bonus -- 5.9 Initiation: structure and objectives -- 5.10 Some basic theory for instructors (and students) -- 5.10.1 A general theory of communication -- 5.10.2 Language, context and communicative intent -- 5.10.3 What makes a speech a.
speech? Function, rhetoric and genre -- 5.10.4 Meaning vs. form-based translation and the Théorie du sens (ITT) -- 5.11 Summary -- Further reading -- 6. Teaching consecutive interpreting -- 6.1 Introduction: teaching full consecutive -- 6.1.1 Note-taking: doctrine and pedagogy -- 6.1.2 Progression in consecutive -- 6.2 Orientation: Introduction to Note-taking (S1 weeks 6-9) -- 6.2.1 Student morale and the learning curve -- 6.2.2 Demonstration: notes as a help and a hindrance -- 6.2.3 The place of theory -- 6.3 Note-taking: the ‘Standard Method’ -- 6.3.1 Cue-words and links -- 6.3.2 Note-taking II: layout and information capture -- 6.3.3 Note-taking III: Completing the Toolkit -- 6.4 Coordination (mid- S1, weeks 10-13) -- 6.4.1 Focus and class procedure -- 6.4.2 The learning curve: getting on the bicycle -- 6.4.3 Coordination: pedagogy and feedback -- 6.4.4 The method and the individual -- 6.5 Experimentation through practice (late S1, early S2) -- 6.5.1 Focus: adaptation and flexibility -- 6.5.2 The learning curve: student and class morale -- 6.5.3 Pedagogical focus and class organization -- 6.6 Consolidation (from early/mid S2 through S3) -- 6.6.1 The learning curve: resurfacing -- 6.6.2 Consolidation: pedagogy and feedback -- 6.6.3 ‘At the table’: adapting to setting and environment -- 6.6.4 Consecutive and new technology -- 6.7 Polishing and advanced consecutive (Year 2, S3-S4) -- 6.8 Research and modelling -- 6.8.1 Observational research: the role of notes -- 6.8.2 Consecutive and memory -- 6.8.3 Attention and processing capacity -- 6.8.3.1 The Effort Model of Consecutive Interpreting -- 6.8.3.2 Reducing cognitive load: knowledge and procedural skills -- 6.8.3.3 Distributing effort between capture and delivery -- 6.8.4 Technique, process and product in consecutive -- 6.9 Summary -- 7. Language, knowledge and working into B -- 7.1 Introduction and overview -- 7.1.1 Language and knowledge in interpreter training -- 7.1.2 The directionality debate: ideals and reality -- 7.2 Language enhancement in the curriculum -- 7.2.1 LE classes for interpreters -- 7.2.2 Feedback in interpreting skills classes -- 7.2.3 Remedial coaching in tutorial format -- 7.2.4 Independent study and practice -- 7.3 Interpreting into B: needs, challenges and strategies -- 7.3.1 Parameters for successful interpreting into B -- 7.3.1.1 Quality of the B language -- 7.3.1.2 Speech and event type -- 7.3.1.3 Finding the right balance -- 7.3.2 Timing and management of into-B training -- 7.3.3 Common into-B problems and remedies -- 7.3.4 SI into B: feedback -- 7.3.4.1 Participation of ‘pure users’ -- 7.3.4.2 Relay interpreting from a pivot working into B -- 7.3.5 Working into B in difficult conditions -- 7.4 Knowledge Enhancement: general and special modules -- 7.4.1 General domain modules: Law and Economics -- 7.4.2 Talking the talk: the language of research reports and presentations -- 7.4.3 Specialized knowledge and customized modules -- 7.5 Some background science -- 7.5.1 Lan.

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