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Non-professional interpreting and translation [electronic resource] : state of the art and future of an emerging field of research

Non-professional interpreting and translation [electronic resource] : state of the art and future of an emerging field of research

Material type
E-Book(소장)
Personal Author
Antonini, Rachele.
Title Statement
Non-professional interpreting and translation [electronic resource] : state of the art and future of an emerging field of research / edited by Rachele Antonini ... [et al.].
Publication, Distribution, etc
Amsterdam ;   Philadelphia :   John Benjamins Publishing Company,   c2017.  
Physical Medium
1 online resource (viii, 415 p.) : ill.
Series Statement
Benjamins translation library ;volume 129
ISBN
9789027266088 (electronic bk.) 9027266085 (electronic bk.) 9789027258755 (hardcover)
General Note
Title from e-Book title page.  
Content Notes
Non-professional Interpreting and Translation; Editorial page; Title page; LCC data; Table of contents; Chapter 1. Introducing NPIT studies; 1. Introduction; 2. How "non-professional" is non-professional interpreting and translation?; 2. How "non-professional" is non-professional interpreting and translation?; 2.1 One thing with many names?; 2.2 Defining non-professional interpreting and translation; 3. Why NPIT is worth studying; 4. The who, what, where, why and how of research on NPIT; 4.1 Overview of the volume; 5. Conclusion; References
Bibliography, Etc. Note
Includes bibliographical references and index.
이용가능한 다른형태자료
Issued also as a book.  
Subject Added Entry-Topical Term
Translating and interpreting --Documentation. Translating and interpreting --Research. Research. Academic writing.
Short cut
URL
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020 ▼a 9027266085 (electronic bk.)
020 ▼a 9789027258755 (hardcover)
035 ▼a (OCoLC)988749761
040 ▼a DLC ▼b eng ▼e rda ▼c DLC ▼d OCLCO ▼d N$T ▼d YDX ▼d IDEBK ▼d EBLCP ▼d MERUC ▼d YDX ▼d UAB ▼d OCLCQ ▼d LND ▼d 211009
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245 0 0 ▼a Non-professional interpreting and translation ▼h [electronic resource] : ▼b state of the art and future of an emerging field of research / ▼c edited by Rachele Antonini ... [et al.].
260 ▼a Amsterdam ; ▼a Philadelphia : ▼b John Benjamins Publishing Company, ▼c c2017.
300 ▼a 1 online resource (viii, 415 p.) : ▼b ill.
490 1 ▼a Benjamins translation library ; ▼v volume 129
500 ▼a Title from e-Book title page.
504 ▼a Includes bibliographical references and index.
505 0 ▼a Non-professional Interpreting and Translation; Editorial page; Title page; LCC data; Table of contents; Chapter 1. Introducing NPIT studies; 1. Introduction; 2. How "non-professional" is non-professional interpreting and translation?; 2. How "non-professional" is non-professional interpreting and translation?; 2.1 One thing with many names?; 2.2 Defining non-professional interpreting and translation; 3. Why NPIT is worth studying; 4. The who, what, where, why and how of research on NPIT; 4.1 Overview of the volume; 5. Conclusion; References
505 8 ▼a Chapter 2. Unprofessional translation: A blog-based overview1. Introduction: Blog publication; 2. The Natural Translation Hypothesis (NTH) and its extensions; 3. Language brokering ; 4. Church interpreting; 5. Religious (written) translation; 6. Wartime interpreting; 7. Medical interpreting; 8. Court interpreting; 9. Sports interpreting; 10. Crowdsourcing; 11. Conclusion; References; Chapter 3. We are all translators: Investigating the human ability to translate from a developmental perspectiveInvestigating the human ability to translate from a developmental perspective; 1. Introduction
505 8 ▼a 2. The human translating mind3. Interlingual translation as a human skill; 4. Need for a developmental perspective; 5. Translation as an untrained ability; 6. Translation as a trained skill, competence and expertise; 7. Misconceptions about the human ability to translate; 8. Consequences of the translation experience; 9. Conclusions; References; Chapter 4. Dialoguing across differences: The past and future of language brokering research; 1. Introduction; 2. From invisibility to visibility; 3. Deficits and deviances; 4. Broadening the developmental lens; 5. Understanding the practice
505 8 ▼a 6. Families and communities7. Classrooms and schools; 8. Feelings; 9. New populations; 10. The future of language brokering research; References; Chapter 5. Intercultural mediation and "(non)professional" interpreting in Italian healthcare institutions: Intercultural mediation and "(non)professional" interpreting in Italian healthcare institutions: Intercultural mediation and "(non)professional" in; 1. Intercultural mediation in Italian healthcare services; 2. Interpreting as intercultural mediation; 3. Aim of this paper; 4. Mediation as intercultural adaptation
505 8 ▼a 4.1 Recontextualising renditions4.2 Authorising recontextualisation; 5. Cultural essentialism; 6. Conclusions: Achieving professionalism in interpreting and intercultural mediation; 6. Conclusions: Achieving professionalism in interpreting and intercultural mediation; References; Chapter 6. More than mere translators: The identities of lay interpreters in medical consultationsThe identities of lay interpreters in medical consultations; 1. Introduction; 2. Identity in interaction: An emergent phenomenon; 3. Lay interpreters in medical consultations; 4. The setting, the data and the method
530 ▼a Issued also as a book.
538 ▼a Mode of access: World Wide Web.
650 0 ▼a Translating and interpreting ▼x Documentation.
650 0 ▼a Translating and interpreting ▼x Research.
650 0 ▼a Research.
650 0 ▼a Academic writing.
700 1 ▼a Antonini, Rachele.
830 0 ▼a Benjamins translation library ; ▼v v. 129.
856 4 0 ▼u https://oca.korea.ac.kr/link.n2s?url=http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&scope=site&db=nlebk&AN=1536304
945 ▼a KLPA
991 ▼a E-Book(소장)

Holdings Information

No. Location Call Number Accession No. Availability Due Date Make a Reservation Service
No. 1 Location Main Library/e-Book Collection/ Call Number CR 418.02 Accession No. E14006545 Availability Loan can not(reference room) Due Date Make a Reservation Service M

Contents information

Table of Contents

Intro -- Non-professional Interpreting and Translation -- Editorial page -- Title page -- LCC data -- Table of contents -- Chapter 1. Introducing NPIT studies -- 1. Introduction -- 2. How “non-professional” is non-professional interpreting and translation? -- 2. How “non-professional” is non-professional interpreting and translation? -- 2.1 One thing with many names? -- 2.2 Defining non-professional interpreting and translation -- 3. Why NPIT is worth studying -- 4. The who, what, where, why and how of research on NPIT -- 4.1 Overview of the volume -- 5. Conclusion -- References -- Chapter 2. Unprofessional translation: A blog-based overview -- 1. Introduction: Blog publication -- 2. The Natural Translation Hypothesis (NTH) and its extensions -- 3. Language brokering -- 4. Church interpreting -- 5. Religious (written) translation -- 6. Wartime interpreting -- 7. Medical interpreting -- 8. Court interpreting -- 9. Sports interpreting -- 10. Crowdsourcing -- 11. Conclusion -- References -- Chapter 3. We are all translators: Investigating the human ability to translate from a developmental perspectiveInvestigating the human ability to translate from a developmental perspective -- 1. Introduction -- 2. The human translating mind -- 3. Interlingual translation as a human skill -- 4. Need for a developmental perspective -- 5. Translation as an untrained ability -- 6. Translation as a trained skill, competence and expertise -- 7. Misconceptions about the human ability to translate -- 8. Consequences of the translation experience -- 9. Conclusions -- References -- Chapter 4. Dialoguing across differences: The past and future of language brokering research -- 1. Introduction -- 2. From invisibility to visibility -- 3. Deficits and deviances -- 4. Broadening the developmental lens -- 5. Understanding the practice -- 6. Families and communities -- 7. Classrooms and schools -- 8. Feelings -- 9. New populations -- 10. The future of language brokering research -- References -- Chapter 5. Intercultural mediation and “(non)professional” interpreting in Italian healthcare institutions: Intercultural mediation and “(non)professional” interpreting in Italian healthcare institutions: Intercultural mediation and “(non)professional” in -- 1. Intercultural mediation in Italian healthcare services -- 2. Interpreting as intercultural mediation -- 3. Aim of this paper -- 4. Mediation as intercultural adaptation -- 4.1 Recontextualising renditions -- 4.2 Authorising recontextualisation -- 5. Cultural essentialism -- 6. Conclusions: Achieving professionalism in interpreting and intercultural mediation -- 6. Conclusions: Achieving professionalism in interpreting and intercultural mediation -- References -- Chapter 6. More than mere translators: The identities of lay interpreters in medical consultationsThe identities of lay interpreters in medical consultations -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Identity in interaction: An emergent phenomenon -- 3. Lay interpreters in medical consulta.
tions -- 4. The setting, the data and the method -- 5. Activities revealing the lay interpreter’s identities -- 5.1 The lay interpreter as a “translator” -- 5.2 The lay interpreter as an “expert” -- 5.3 The lay interpreter as a social “peer” -- 5.4 Participants’ misalignment from the lay interpreter’s activity -- 6. Conclusions -- Acknowledgements -- References -- Appendix. Transcription conventions -- Chapter 7. Issues of terminology in public service interpreting: From affordability through psychotherapy to waiting listsFrom affordability through psychotherapy to waiting lists -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Public service interpreting and the language of institutional encounters -- 3. Terminology in translation and interpreting studies -- 4. Terminology in public service interpreting -- 5. Empirical study: Specialist terminology in public service encounters -- 5.1 Project synopsis: Interpreting in social service and welfare institutions -- 5.2 Methods -- 5.3 Project results -- 5.4 Taxonomy of strategies -- 5.5 Examples of specialist language -- 6. Conclusion -- References -- Chapter 9. The role and self-regulation of non-professional interpreters in religious settings: The role and self-regulation of non-professional interpreters in religious settings: The role and self-regulation of non-professional interpreters in religious -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Globalization and expansion of religious spaces: The Pentecostal koinonia -- 2. Globalization and expansion of religious spaces: The Pentecostal koinonia -- 2.1 The semiotics of evangelical discourse -- 2.2 Community of practice -- 3. Self-regulation and interpreting cognition -- 4. The VIRS project: Methodology and analysis -- 4.1 Method -- 4.2 Participants -- 4.3 Analysis of the self-regulatory processes of VIRS -- 5. Conclusions -- References -- Chapter 10. Simultaneous interpreting and religious experience: Simultaneous interpreting and religious experience: Volunteer interpreting in a Finnish Pentecostal churchVolunteer interpreting in a Finnish Pentecostal church -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Methodology -- 3. Pentecostalism and religious experience -- 4. Interpreting for and through religious experience -- 4.1 Description of the interpreting practice -- 4.2 Preparing to interpret in a Pentecostal meeting -- 4.3 Hearing from God: Religious experience during simultaneous interpreting -- 5. Conclusions -- References -- Chapter 11. Beyond the professional scope?: Sign language translation as a new challenge in the fieldSign language translation as a new challenge in the field -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Sign language translation -- 2.1 Development -- 2.2 Research and typology -- 3. Challenges -- 3.1 Case study and method -- 3.2 Textual challenges: What should the text look like? -- 3.3 Social challenges: Who should the translator be? -- 4. Conclusion -- References -- Chapter 12. Language-related disaster relief in Haiti: Volunteer translator networks and language technologies in disaster aid -- 1. Introductio.
n -- 2. Translation and interpreting in the humanitarian field -- 2.1 Chronology -- 2.2 Location -- 2.3 Scale -- 3. The role of information and communication technologies (ICTs) -- 4. Case study: Haiti earthquake 2010 -- 4.1 Haiti 2010 -- 4.2 Coordination -- 4.3 Needs assessment and mobilisation: Achievements -- 4.4 Needs assessment and mobilization: Problems and challenges -- 4.5 Project planning and implementation -- 5. Concluding remarks -- References -- Chapter 13. Bilingual youngsters’ perceptions of their role as family interpreters: Bilingual youngsters’ perceptions of their role as family interpreters: Why should their views be measured? Why should they count?Why should their views be measured? Why s -- 1. Introduction -- 2. From the Spanish conquest to the 21st century -- 3. Sociolinguistic environment: The need for access -- 4. Latino youngsters providing “access” -- 5. Review of relevant literature -- 5.1 Children and youngsters as language brokers -- 5.2 Areas of tension -- 5.3 Academic achievement through language brokering -- 5.4 Development of cognitive and metalinguistic skills -- 6. Adaptation of a measurement instrument -- 6.1 Instrument design: Adaptation of IPRI -- 7. Conclusion -- References -- Chapter 15. Child language brokering in private and public settings: Child language brokering in private and public settings: Perspectives from young brokers and their teachers -- 1. Aims and method of the study -- 2. The who, where, when, and what of CLB -- 3. CLB viewed by young brokers and their teachers -- 4. Discussion -- References -- Chapter 16. Through the children’s voice: An analysis of language brokering experiences -- 1. Introduction -- 2. The In MedIO PUER(I) project -- 2.1 Research on/with children and the use of narratives -- 2.2 Narrative research -- 3. The school competition: Traduttori in Erba (Budding Translators/Interpreters) -- 3.1 The when and what of CLB: The school setting -- 3.2 Children’s perception of their role as language mediators -- 4. Conclusions -- References -- Appendix. Examples in the original language -- Chapter 17. Seeing brokering in bright colours: Participatory artwork elicitation in CLB research -- 1. Why artwork elicitation -- 2. The study: Data collection and method of analysis -- 3. The child in the middle: Where does the broker stand? -- 4. The colours of brokering -- 5. Conclusions -- References -- Chapter 18. Language brokering: Mediated manipulations, and the agency of the interpreter/translatorMediated manipulations, and the agency of the interpreter/translator -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Agency: A theoretical framework for analysing child language brokering -- 2.1 Agency: Achieved in the process of social interaction -- 3. The study -- 3.1 Language brokers as agents -- 3.2 Manipulating information during mediation -- 3.3 Translating documents -- 3.4 Editing -- 3.5 Censoring information -- 3.6 Disagreements during language brokering -- 4. Why manipulate and censor -- 4.1 Lack of vocabulary.

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