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Historical linguistics : toward a twenty-first century reintegration

Historical linguistics : toward a twenty-first century reintegration (Loan 1 times)

Material type
단행본
Personal Author
Ringe, Don, 1954-. Eska, Joseph F.
Title Statement
Historical linguistics : toward a twenty-first century reintegration / Don Ringe and Joseph F. Eska.
Publication, Distribution, etc
Cambridge, [England] ;   New York :   Cambridge University Press,   2013.  
Physical Medium
xiv, 313 p. : ill. ; 25 cm.
ISBN
9780521583329 (hbk.) 9780521587112 (pbk.)
요약
"Bringing the advances of theoretical linguistics to the study of language change in a systematic way, this innovative textbook demonstrates the mutual relevance of historical linguistics and contemporary linguistics. Numerous case studies throughout the book show both that theoretical linguistics can be used to solve problems where traditional approaches to historical linguistics have failed to produce satisfying results, and that the results of historical research can have an impact on theory. The book first explains the nature of human language and the sources of language change in broad terms. It then focuses on different types of language change from contemporary viewpoints, before exploring comparative reconstruction - the most spectacular success of traditional historical linguistics - and the problems inherent in trying to devise new methods for linguistic comparison. Positioned at the cutting edge of the field, the book argues that this approach can and should lead to the reintegration of historical linguistics as one of the core areas in the study of language"--
Content Notes
Machine generated contents note: Introduction; 1. The nature of human language and language variation -- 2. Language replication and language change -- 3. Language change in the speech community -- 4. Language contact as a source of change -- 5. Sound change -- 6. The evolution of phonological rules -- 7. Morphology -- 8. Morphological change -- 9. Syntactic change -- 10. Reconstruction -- 11. Beyond comparative reconstruction: subgrouping and 'long-distance' relationships -- Appendix: recovering the pronunciation of dead languages: types of evidence.
Bibliography, Etc. Note
Includes bibliographical references (p. 291-308) and indexes.
Subject Added Entry-Topical Term
Historical linguistics. Linguistic change. Language and languages -- Variation.
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008 140626s2013 enka b 001 0 eng
010 ▼a 2012023182
020 ▼a 9780521583329 (hbk.)
020 ▼a 9780521587112 (pbk.)
035 ▼a (KERIS)REF000016847822
040 ▼a DLC ▼c DLC ▼d 211009
050 0 0 ▼a P142 ▼b .R56 2013
082 0 0 ▼a 417/.7 ▼2 23
084 ▼a 417.7 ▼2 DDCK
090 ▼a 417.7 ▼b R581h
100 1 ▼a Ringe, Don, ▼d 1954-.
245 1 0 ▼a Historical linguistics : ▼b toward a twenty-first century reintegration / ▼c Don Ringe and Joseph F. Eska.
260 ▼a Cambridge, [England] ; ▼a New York : ▼b Cambridge University Press, ▼c 2013.
300 ▼a xiv, 313 p. : ▼b ill. ; ▼c 25 cm.
504 ▼a Includes bibliographical references (p. 291-308) and indexes.
505 0 0 ▼g Machine generated contents note: Introduction; 1. ▼t The nature of human language and language variation -- ▼g 2. ▼t Language replication and language change -- ▼g 3. ▼t Language change in the speech community -- ▼g 4. ▼t Language contact as a source of change -- ▼g 5. ▼t Sound change -- ▼g 6. ▼t The evolution of phonological rules -- ▼g 7. ▼t Morphology -- ▼g 8. ▼t Morphological change -- ▼g 9. ▼t Syntactic change -- ▼g 10. ▼t Reconstruction -- ▼g 11. ▼t Beyond comparative reconstruction: subgrouping and 'long-distance' relationships -- ▼g Appendix: ▼t recovering the pronunciation of dead languages: types of evidence.
520 ▼a "Bringing the advances of theoretical linguistics to the study of language change in a systematic way, this innovative textbook demonstrates the mutual relevance of historical linguistics and contemporary linguistics. Numerous case studies throughout the book show both that theoretical linguistics can be used to solve problems where traditional approaches to historical linguistics have failed to produce satisfying results, and that the results of historical research can have an impact on theory. The book first explains the nature of human language and the sources of language change in broad terms. It then focuses on different types of language change from contemporary viewpoints, before exploring comparative reconstruction - the most spectacular success of traditional historical linguistics - and the problems inherent in trying to devise new methods for linguistic comparison. Positioned at the cutting edge of the field, the book argues that this approach can and should lead to the reintegration of historical linguistics as one of the core areas in the study of language"-- ▼c Provided by publisher.
650 0 ▼a Historical linguistics.
650 0 ▼a Linguistic change.
650 0 ▼a Language and languages ▼x Variation.
700 1 ▼a Eska, Joseph F.
740 0 2 ▼a Nature of human language and language variation.
740 0 2 ▼a Evolution of phonological rules.
945 ▼a KLPA

No. Location Call Number Accession No. Availability Due Date Make a Reservation Service
No. 1 Location Main Library/Western Books/ Call Number 417.7 R581h Accession No. 111720034 Availability Available Due Date Make a Reservation Service B M
No. 2 Location Sejong Academic Information Center/Humanities 1/ Call Number 417.7 R581h Accession No. 151321301 Availability Available Due Date Make a Reservation Service M
No. Location Call Number Accession No. Availability Due Date Make a Reservation Service
No. 1 Location Main Library/Western Books/ Call Number 417.7 R581h Accession No. 111720034 Availability Available Due Date Make a Reservation Service B M
No. Location Call Number Accession No. Availability Due Date Make a Reservation Service
No. 1 Location Sejong Academic Information Center/Humanities 1/ Call Number 417.7 R581h Accession No. 151321301 Availability Available Due Date Make a Reservation Service M

Contents information

Table of Contents

Introduction; 1. The nature of human language and language variation; 2. Language replication and language change; 3. Language change in the speech community; 4. Language contact as a source of change; 5. Sound change; 6. The evolution of phonological rules; 7. Morphology; 8. Morphological change; 9. Syntactic change; 10. Reconstruction; 11. Beyond comparative reconstruction: subgrouping and 'long-distance' relationships; Appendix: recovering the pronunciation of dead languages: types of evidence.


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