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Approaching dialogue : talk, interaction and contexts in dialogical perspectives

Approaching dialogue : talk, interaction and contexts in dialogical perspectives (4회 대출)

자료유형
단행본
개인저자
Linell, Per, 1944-.
서명 / 저자사항
Approaching dialogue : talk, interaction and contexts in dialogical perspectives / Per Linell.
발행사항
Amsterdam ;   Philadelphia, PA :   J. Benjamins Pub. Co.,   1998.  
형태사항
xvii, 330 p. ; 23 cm.
총서사항
Impact, studies in language and society,1385-7908 ; v. 3
ISBN
1556198523 (alk. paper) 1588110915 (pbk.)
서지주기
Includes bibliographical references (p. [289]-320) and index.
일반주제명
Dialogue analysis. Discourse analysis. Semantics. Communication.
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008 120202s1998 ne b 001 0 eng d
010 ▼a 98039787
020 ▼a 1556198523 (alk. paper)
020 ▼a 1588110915 (pbk.)
035 ▼a (KERIS)REF000005070171
040 ▼a DLC ▼c DLC ▼d DLC ▼d 211009
050 0 0 ▼a P95.455 ▼b .L56 1998
082 0 0 ▼a 401/.41 ▼2 22
084 ▼a 401.41 ▼2 DDCK
090 ▼a 401.41 ▼b L754a
100 1 ▼a Linell, Per, ▼d 1944-.
245 1 0 ▼a Approaching dialogue : ▼b talk, interaction and contexts in dialogical perspectives / ▼c Per Linell.
260 ▼a Amsterdam ; ▼a Philadelphia, PA : ▼b J. Benjamins Pub. Co., ▼c 1998.
300 ▼a xvii, 330 p. ; ▼c 23 cm.
490 1 ▼a Impact, studies in language and society, ▼x 1385-7908 ; ▼v v. 3
504 ▼a Includes bibliographical references (p. [289]-320) and index.
650 0 ▼a Dialogue analysis.
650 0 ▼a Discourse analysis.
650 0 ▼a Semantics.
650 0 ▼a Communication.
830 0 ▼a Impact, studies in language and society ; ▼v v. 3.
945 ▼a KLPA

소장정보

No. 소장처 청구기호 등록번호 도서상태 반납예정일 예약 서비스
No. 1 소장처 중앙도서관/서고6층/ 청구기호 401.41 L754a 등록번호 111655913 도서상태 대출가능 반납예정일 예약 서비스 B M

컨텐츠정보

목차


CONTENTS
Table of Contents = ⅴ
Preface = xiii
PART Ⅰ. Monologism and Dialogism Contrasted
 CHAPTER I Perspectives on language and discourse = 3
  1.1 Language as system vs. language in practice = 3
  1.2 Discourse : Individuals' use of language or interactions-in-contexts = 5
  1.3 Dialogism, dialogicality and dialogue = 8
  1.4 The traditional conflation of 'dialogism' and 'dialogue = 9
  1.5 Dialogue : Interaction between co-present individuals through symbolic means = 12
 CHAPTER 2. Monologism : Its basic assumptions = 17
  2.1 Cognition and communication as empirically distinct phenomena = 17
  2.2 Cognition as information processing by individuals = 18
  2.3 The transfer-and-exchange model of communication = 21
  2.4 The code model of language structure = 24
  2.5 The indirect dependence on written language in monologism = 27
  2.6 The ontological assumptions of monologism = 32
 CHAPTER 3. Dialogism : Some historical roots and present-day trends = 35
  3.1 Interactions, contexts and social (re)construction = 35
  3.2 Dialogism of classical times = 37
  3.3 Before the 20th century = 38 
  3.4 Some 20th century traditions = 40
   3.4.1 Phenomenology : Perspectives and multiple realities = 40
   3.4.2 Pragmatism : The gradual emergence of meaning = 43
   3.4.3 Symbolic interactionism and social behaviourism : The three-step model of communicative interaction = 44
   3.4.4 Sociocultural theory : Activity types and semiotic mediation = 46
   3.4.5 Summary : Some dialogistic ideas = 48
  3.5 Some present-day research traditions. : Empirical studies of discourse in interaction and contexts = 49
 CHAPTER 4. Language structure and linguistic practices = 55
  4.1 The monologistic theory : Social realism plus individualism = 55
  4.2 Radical interactionism = 57
  4.3 Social constructionism = 59
PART Ⅱ. Interacting and making sense in contexts
 CHAPTER 5. The dynamics of dialogue = 67
  5.I Conversation as the habitat of dialogical principles = 67
  5.2 The sequential organization of a social activity = 69
  5.3 Coordination and synchronization of utterance segments in dialogue - = 71
  5.4 Co-accomplishment in concerted activities = 73
  5.5 Interaction as expressing and testing mutual understanding = 77
  5.6 The local production of meaning and coherence = 80
  5.7 Dialogue as a series of opportunities for relevant continuations = 82
  5.8 The dynamics of discourse units = 84
  5.9 Summary : Some dialogical principles = 85
   5.9.1 Sequentiality = 85
   5.9.2 Joint construction = 86
   5.9.3 Act-activity interdependence = 87
   5.9.4 A superordinate principle : Reflexivity between discourse and contexts = 88
  5.10 Differing perspectives on dialogicality = 89
 CHAPTER 6. Speakers and listeners = 91
  6.1 Monological speakers or dialogical interlocutors = 91
  6.2 Speaking : The production of utterances? = 92
  6.3 Embodied minds and persons in interaction = 96
  6.4 The production of utterance meaning = 97
   6.4.1 Reference and situated description = 98
   6.4.2 Responsive properties = 99
   6.4.3 Obligational aspects = 100
   6.4.4 The 'why' of communication = 100
   6.4.5 Social languages = 101
  6.5 The role of the speaker's partners in authoring utterances = 101
   6.5.1 The addressee = 102
   6.5.2 Other listeners = 104
   6.5.3 Principals and remote audiences = 107
  6.6 Conclusion = 109
 CHAPTER 7. Sense-making in discourse and the situated fixation of linguistic meanings = 111
  7.1 Linguistic meaning and situated interpretation = 111
  7.2 Meaning in fixed codes and fixed contexts, or accomplishments in situated activities = 112
  7.3 Situatedness : Contextualization, decontextualization and recontextualization = 115
  7.4 The nature of lexical meanings : Stable features or dynamic potentials? = 118
  7.5 Fixed word meanings or temporary fixations = 121
 CHAPTER 8. Contexts in discourse and discourse in contexts = 127
  8.1 The incompleteness of language = 127
  8.2 Types of contextual resources = 128
  8.3 Dimensions of contexts : cross-classifying contexts and contextual resources = 131
  8.4 Two perspectives on contexts of discourse = 134
  8.5 Some additional properties of contexts = 136
   8.5.1 Backgrounding = 136
   8.5.2 Relevance = 137
   8.5.3 Partial sharedness = 138
   8.5.4 Dynamics of utterance, contexts and understanding = 139
  8.6 Recontextualizations at the micro-level ; selective use of cotextual resources = 140
  8.7 Fragments of discourses and contexts = 144
  8.8 Local decontextualizations = 148
  8.9 Perspectival conflicts and competing context spaces = 151
  8.10 Recontextualizations at a global level : Intertextuality and interdiscursivity = 154
 CHAPTER 9. Elementary contributions to discourse = 159
  9.1 Elementary building-blocks : Utterances, idea units and turns at talk = 159
  9.2 The response-initiative structure of contributions to dialogue = 161
  9.3 Excursus : The elements of social action = 166
  9.4 Varieties of contributions to dialogue = 169
  9.5 Utterances that are not full-fledged contributions to dialogue = 173
  9.6 Initiative and response as relational aspects of turns = 175
  9.7 Coding elementary contributions to dialogue = 177
  9.8 The dialogicality of larger units of discourse = 178
 CHAPTER 10. Episodes and topics = 181
  10.1 Topic progression in the flow of discourse = 181
  10.2 The joint production of a topic = 183
  10.3 Episodes : units of natural social interaction = 186
  10.4 Monotopical and polytopical episodes = 188
  10.5 Non-topical episodes = 190
  10.6 Local and global coherence = 191
  10.7 Topical trajectories and transitions between episodes = 193
  10.8 Topical development in monologue = 195
  10.9 Episodes as the locus for creating temporarily shared understanding = 198
  10.10 The gradual determination of indeterminate topics = 200
  10.11 Episodes and topics as emergent and dynamic events = 200
  10.12 Units of talk-in-interaction = 202
 CHAPTER 11. Communicative projects = 207
  11.1 Communicative actions as interactions = 207
  11.2 Speech act theory : Monological acts by individual speakers = 208
  11.3 Intentionality and responsibility = 211
  11.4 From speech acts to local sequences, language games and communicative projects = 212
  11.5 The notion of a 'communicative project' : A first approximation = 217
  11.6 Communicative projects : Asymmetrical participation and collective accomplishment = 220
  11.7 Limits to sharedness : Misalignment of parties' projects, and coordination of competing goals = 224
  11.8 The nested nature of projects = 225
  11.9 Communicative strategies : Methods of accomplishing communicative projects = 227
  11.10 The past- and future-orientation of communicative projects = 230
  11.11 'Communicative project' as a discourse-analytic concept = 231
 CHAPTER 12. Situation definitions, activity types and communicative genres = 235
  12.1 Activity types as situation definitions = 235
  12.2 Communicative genres = 238
  12.3 Genres of 'ordinary conversation' = 241
  12.4 The global structure of activities : Core activities and phase structure = 243
  12.5 Communication in relation to non-communicative activities = 244
  12.6 Coherence, relevance and topic progression as activity-dependent = 249
  12.7 The creative accomplishment of routines within genres = 253
  12.8 The partial sharedness of activities and genres = 254
  12.9 Classifying communicative activities in families = 257
PART Ⅲ. Monologism and dialogism reconciled? = 261
 CHAPTER 13. Dialogism : opportunities and limitations = 263
  13.1 Dialogical principles and the theory of discourse structure = 263
  13.2 Dialogue theory and empirical methods = 265
  13.3 Extending dialogue theory : A general epistemology for communication and cognition = 266
   13.3.1 Monological speech and thought = 267
   13.3.2 Dialogism and written texts = 268
  13.4 Dialogism as opposed to radical social constructionism = 270
   13.4.1 Subjects and agency = 270
   13.4.2 The material basis as constraints on discursive construction = 271
  13.5 Dialogism as a context-specific framework = 274
  13.6 The limits of dialogism = 275
 CHAPTER 14. Reconstructing monologism as a special case = 277
  14.1 Monologism and dialogism as perspectivized frameworks = 277
  14.2 In support of monologistic practices = 278
  14.3 From decontextualizing practices to decontextualized theories = 281
  14.4 Conclusion = 286
References = 289
Appendix : Transcription conventions = 321
Index = 323


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