HOME > Detail View

Detail View

"Armed attack" and Article 51 of the UN Charter : evolutions in customary law and practice (Loan 15 times)

Material type
단행본
Personal Author
Ruys, Tom.
Title Statement
"Armed attack" and Article 51 of the UN Charter : evolutions in customary law and practice / Tom Ruys.
Publication, Distribution, etc
New York :   Cambridge University Press,   2010.  
Physical Medium
xxx, 585 p. ; 24 cm.
ISBN
9780521766647 (hardback)
요약
"This book examines to what extent the right of self-defence, as laid down in Article 51 of the Charter of the United Nations, permits States to launch military operations against other States. In particular, it focuses on the occurrence of an 'armed attack' - the crucial trigger for the activation of this right. In light of the developments since 9/11, the author analyses relevant physical and verbal customary practice, ranging from the 1974 Definition of Aggression to recent incidents such as the 2001 US intervention in Afghanistan and the 2006 Israeli intervention in Lebanon. The notion of 'armed attack' is examined from a threefold perspective. What acts can be regarded as an 'armed attack'? When can an 'armed attack' be considered to take place? And from whom must an 'armed attack' emanate? By way of conclusion, the different findings are brought together in a draft 'Definition of Armed Attack'"--
Content Notes
The methodological debate and the quest for custom -- 'Armed attack' and other conditions of self-defence -- The 'armed attack' requirement ratione materiae -- The 'armed attack' requirement ratione temporis -- The 'armed attack' requirement ratione personae -- What future for the 'armed attack' criterion?
Bibliography, Etc. Note
Includes bibliographical references and index.
Subject Added Entry-Topical Term
Self-defense (International law) Aggression (International law)
000 03515camuu2200313 a 4500
001 000045657095
005 20110715093157
008 110715s2010 nyu b 001 0 eng d
010 ▼a 2010019534
020 ▼a 9780521766647 (hardback)
035 ▼a (KERIS)REF000015819052
040 ▼a DLC ▼c DLC ▼d DLC ▼d 211009
050 0 0 ▼a KZ6374 ▼b .R89 2010
082 0 0 ▼a 341.6/2 ▼2 22
084 ▼a 341.62 ▼2 DDCK
090 ▼a 341.62 ▼b R985a
100 1 ▼a Ruys, Tom.
245 1 0 ▼a "Armed attack" and Article 51 of the UN Charter : ▼b evolutions in customary law and practice / ▼c Tom Ruys.
260 ▼a New York : ▼b Cambridge University Press, ▼c 2010.
300 ▼a xxx, 585 p. ; ▼c 24 cm.
504 ▼a Includes bibliographical references and index.
505 0 ▼a The methodological debate and the quest for custom -- 'Armed attack' and other conditions of self-defence -- The 'armed attack' requirement ratione materiae -- The 'armed attack' requirement ratione temporis -- The 'armed attack' requirement ratione personae -- What future for the 'armed attack' criterion?
505 8 ▼a Machine generated contents note: Introduction; 1. The methodological debate and the quest for custom; 2. Conditions of self-defence; 3. The Armed Attack Requirement Ratione Materiae; 4. The Armed Attack Requirement Ratione Temporis; 5. The Armed Attack Requirement Ratione Personae; 6. What future for the armed attack criterion?
520 ▼a "This book examines to what extent the right of self-defence, as laid down in Article 51 of the Charter of the United Nations, permits States to launch military operations against other States. In particular, it focuses on the occurrence of an 'armed attack' - the crucial trigger for the activation of this right. In light of the developments since 9/11, the author analyses relevant physical and verbal customary practice, ranging from the 1974 Definition of Aggression to recent incidents such as the 2001 US intervention in Afghanistan and the 2006 Israeli intervention in Lebanon. The notion of 'armed attack' is examined from a threefold perspective. What acts can be regarded as an 'armed attack'? When can an 'armed attack' be considered to take place? And from whom must an 'armed attack' emanate? By way of conclusion, the different findings are brought together in a draft 'Definition of Armed Attack'"-- ▼c Provided by publisher.
520 ▼a "On June 27, 1986, the International Court of Justice pronounced its much-anticipated judgment in the Nicaragua case. For the first time in its history, it gave a direct and elaborate ruling on issues pertaining to the international law on the use of force (Ius ad Bellum), including on the conditions for the exercise of States' right of self-defence. If the Court's approach merits praise for unequivocally affirming that disputes involving the recourse to force are inherently justiciable, it is somewhat puzzling what led the Hague Judges to conclude that "[t]here appears now to be general agreement on the nature of the acts which can be treated as constituting armed attacks", triggering the right of self-defence. Whether it was naivety, overconfidence or bluff on their part is open to speculation, yet one need not possess the combined legal skills of Grotius and Vattel to understand that it did not completely reflect normative reality"-- ▼c Provided by publisher.
650 0 ▼a Self-defense (International law)
650 0 ▼a Aggression (International law)
945 ▼a KLPA

Holdings Information

No. Location Call Number Accession No. Availability Due Date Make a Reservation Service
No. 1 Location Main Library/Law Library(Books/B1)/ Call Number 341.62 R985a Accession No. 111635117 Availability Available Due Date Make a Reservation Service B M

Contents information

Table of Contents

Introduction; 1. The methodological debate and the quest for custom; 2. Conditions of self-defence; 3. The Armed Attack Requirement Ratione Materiae; 4. The Armed Attack Requirement Ratione Temporis; 5. The Armed Attack Requirement Ratione Personae; 6. What future for the armed attack criterion?


Information Provided By: : Aladin

New Arrivals Books in Related Fields