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Second language syntax : a generative introduction

Second language syntax : a generative introduction (Loan 14 times)

Material type
단행본
Personal Author
Hawkins, Roger (Roger D.)
Title Statement
Second language syntax : a generative introduction / Roger Hawkins.
Publication, Distribution, etc
Oxford ;   Malden, Mass. :   Blackwell Publishers ,   2001.  
Physical Medium
xviii, 386 p. : ill. ; 26 cm.
ISBN
0631191836 (alk. paper) 0631191844 (pbk. : alk. paper) 9780631191841 (pbk. : alk. paper)
Bibliography, Etc. Note
Includes bibliographical references (p. [365]-377) and index.
Subject Added Entry-Topical Term
Second language acquisition. Grammar, Comparative and general -- Syntax. Generative grammar.
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008 000627s2001 enka b 001 0 eng
010 ▼a 00057910
020 ▼a 0631191836 (alk. paper)
020 ▼a 0631191844 (pbk. : alk. paper)
020 ▼a 9780631191841 (pbk. : alk. paper)
035 ▼a (KERIS)REF000009615971
040 ▼a DLC ▼c DLC ▼d DLC ▼d 211009
050 0 0 ▼a P118.2 ▼b .H366 2001
082 0 0 ▼a 418 ▼2 22
090 ▼a 418 ▼b H394s
100 1 ▼a Hawkins, Roger ▼q (Roger D.)
245 1 0 ▼a Second language syntax : ▼b a generative introduction / ▼c Roger Hawkins.
260 ▼a Oxford ; ▼a Malden, Mass. : ▼b Blackwell Publishers , ▼c 2001.
300 ▼a xviii, 386 p. : ▼b ill. ; ▼c 26 cm.
504 ▼a Includes bibliographical references (p. [365]-377) and index.
650 0 ▼a Second language acquisition.
650 0 ▼a Grammar, Comparative and general ▼x Syntax.
650 0 ▼a Generative grammar.
945 ▼a KINS

Holdings Information

No. Location Call Number Accession No. Availability Due Date Make a Reservation Service
No. 1 Location Main Library/Western Books/ Call Number 418 H394s Accession No. 111534033 Availability Available Due Date Make a Reservation Service B M

Contents information

Book Introduction

《Second Language Syntax》에서는 제2언어(Second Language) 구문에 대한 이론들을 제시하고 설명함으로써, 독자들이 문법적인 부분에서의 지식을 향상시킬 수 있도록 도와준다. 각 장에서는 이론과 함께 충분한 분량의 연습문제를 두어 설명한 내용들을 확고하게 이해할 수 있도록 하였다.


Information Provided By: : Aladin

Table of Contents


CONTENTS
List of Figures = xii
List of Tables = xiii
Preface = xv
Acknowledgements = xvii
1 A Framework for Studying Second Language Syntax = 1
 1.1 Introduction = 1
 1.2 What is syntax? = 2
 1.3 What is a grammar? = 4
 1.4 Evidence that the mechanisms which underlie grammarbuilding are innate = 4
 1.5 Investigating the nature of mental grammars independently of other types of knowledge = 7
 1.6 Studying second language syntax = 10
  1.6.1 The acquisition of unstressed object pronouns in L2 French and English = 10
  1.6.2 A principle and two parameters of Universal Grammar relating to phrase structure = 13
  1.6.3 Applying the principles and parameters framework to explaining the L2 observations = 16
 1.7 Acquiring or learning syntax? Second language acquisition in naturalistic and classroom environments = 18
 1.8 Second language syntactic development is similar in child and adult learners = 22
 1.9 The nature of the data available to second language researchers = 22
 1.10 Summary of chapter 1 = 24
 1.11 Exercises = 25
 1.12 Further reading = 32
2 The Second Language Acquisition of Grammatical Morphology = 34
 2.1 Introduction = 34
 2.2 Lexical and grammatical forms in language = 35
 2.3 What are morphemes? = 36
 2.4 Early studies of the L2 acquisition of grammatical morphemes = 38
  2.4.1 L2 learners find the same morphemes difficult = 38
  2.4.2 L1 influence on the difficulty of L2 morphemes = 40
  2.4.3 Similarities between children and adults in the acquisition of L2morphemes = 43
  2.4.4 Summary of section 2.4 = 43
 2.5 Linking L2 accuracy profiles on grammatical morphology to the building of a mental grammar = 44
 2.6 The category Infl and phrase structure = 49
  2.6.1 Infl = 49
  2.6.2 Infl and phrase projection = 50
  2.6.3 Summary of section 2.6 = 53
 2.7 The role of VP and IP in the L2 acquisition of English verbal morphology : a first sketch = 54
 2.8 Comparing the accuracy profiles of individual Spanish and Japanese learners of English = 55
 2.9 Summary of the findings in sections 2.4-2.5 and 2.7-2.8 = 59
  More Advanced Discussion = 60
 2.10 The role of VP and IP in the L2 acquisition of English verbal morphology : a second sketch = 60
 2.11 Placing the account in the context of more general theories of L2 syntactic development = 67
  2.11.1 'Minimal trees' (Vainikka and Young-Scholten, 1994, 1996a, 1996b) = 68
  2.11.2 'Valueless features' (Eubank, 1993/94, 1994a, 1996) = 69
  2.11.3 'Full access' theories (Schwartz and Sprouse, 1994, 1996 ; Epstein, Flynn and Martohardjono, 1996 ; Grondin and White, 1996) = 71
  2.11.4 A composite 'working theory' of L2 syntactic development : modulated structure building = 73
 2.12 Summary of chapter 2 = 74
 2.13 Exercises = 76
 2.14 Further reading = 80
3 The Second Language Acquisition of Negation and Verb Movement = 82
 3.1 Introduction = 82
 3.2 Negation in English and a second language descriptive generalization = 83
 3.3 The category Neg in English, Spanish and French = 88
  3.3.1 Distributional properties = 89
  3.3.2 The category Neg = 90
  3.3.3 Strong and weak inflections in I = 93
  3.3.4 Principles and parameters in relation to negation = 94
  3.3.5 Summary of the syntactic properties associated with negation = 95
 3.4 The L2 acquisition of sentential negation as the acquisition of NegP and IP = 96
 3.5 Placing the account in the context of the 'modulated structure building' theory of L2 syntactic development = 101
  More Advanced Discussion = 103
 3.6 Considering verb movement in more detail = 103
 3.7 Summary of chapter 3 = 113
 3.8 Exercises = 114
 3.9 Further reading = 122
4 The Second Language Acquisition of Word Order = 124
 4.1 Introduction = 124
 4.2 Location of verbs in German = 125
 4.3 The second language acquisition of verb location in German = 127
 4.4 The category Complementizer, its projection CP and the structure of German clauses = 130
  4.4.1 The basic word order of German = 130
  4.4.2 'Verb second' in main clauses = 132
  4.4.3 The 'verb separation' effect = 133
  4.4.4 Embedded clauses = 135
 4.5 Explaining the second language acquisition of German word order as grammar-building = 136
 4.6 Refining the account of grammar-building in the acquisition of German word order = 139
 4.7 Summary of the grammar-building account of the acquisition of German word order = 144
  More Advanced Discussion = 146
 4.8 The second language acquisition of English questions = 146
  4.8.1 The role of CP in question formation, and a parametric difference between languages = 147
  4.8.2 The L2 acquisition of English questions as the acquisition of CP = 151
  More Advanced Discussion = 154
 4.9 The second language acquisition of relative clauses = 154
  4.9.1 The structure of relative clauses in English = 154
  4.9.2 A parametric difference between languages in the construction of relative clauses = 157
  4.9.3 The second language acquisition of restrictive relative clauses and the 'modulated structure building' theory of syntactic development = 159
 4.10 Summary of chapter 4 = 162
 4.11 Exercises = 164
 4.12 Further reading = 171
5 The Second Language Acquisition of Subjects, Objects and Other Participants in Clauses = 173
 5.1 Introduction = 173
 5.2 Some cross-linguistic differences in the syntactic realization of event structure = 175
 5.3 Argument structure and thematic roles = 177
  5.3.1 Arguments and adjuncts = 177
  5.3.2 Arguments structure = 178
  5.3.3 Case assignment and the Case Filter = 181
  5.3.4 The interaction of Case assignment and argument structure : unaccusative and unergative verbs = 182
  5.3.5 Summary of section 5.3 = 184
 5.4 The second language acquisition of unaccusative verb constructions = 184
  5.4.1 Evidence that awareness of the unaccusative/unergative distinction guides grammar building = 184
  5.4.2 Persistent difficulty in establishing the syntactic realization of argument structure = 189
  5.4.3 Summary of section 5.4 = 195
 5.5 Null subjects in Greek, Italian and Spanish and second language acquisition = 196
  5.5.1 The licensing and identification of null subjects = 197
  5.5.2 The pro-drop parameter = 199
  5.5.3 Resetting the pro-drop parameter in SLA = 202
  More Advanced Discussion = 208
 5.6 Difficulties with parameter resetting as a potential source of divergence between L2 and native mental grammars = 208
  More Advanced Discussion = 209
 5.7 Null subjects and objects in Chinese, Japanese and Korean and second language acquisition = 209
  5.7.1 Null subjects and topicalization in Chinese-type languages = 210
  5.7.2 Differences between speakers of Chinese-type languages and Greek-type languages in the acquisition of English = 214
 5.8 Summary of chapter 5 = 220
 5.9 Exercises = 222
 5.10 Further reading = 228
6 The Second Language Acquisition of Nominal Phrases = 231
 6.1 Introduction = 231
 6.2 Studies of the second language acquisition of the English articles the, a, ø = 232
  6.2.1 The distribution and interpretation of English articles = 232
  6.2.2 Two studies of the second language acquisition of English articles = 236
 6.3 The structure of English determiner phrases = 240
 6.4 Grammar-building in the second language acquisition of DPs = 244
  6.4.1 Incremental development in the acquisition of DP = 244
  6.4.2 L1 influence on the building of grammatical representations for DP = 246
  More Advanced Discussion = 248
 6.5 L1 influence and the functional category Num(ber) = 248
  More Advanced Discussion = 253
 6.6 A persistent difficulty for L2 speakers in constructing a representation for the DP = 253
 6.7 Summary of chapter 6 = 258
 6.8 Exercises = 259
 6.9 Further reading = 264
7 Constraints on Syntactic Representations and Second Language Acquisition = 267
 7.1 Introduction = 267
 7.2 The early treatment of constraints on the movement of constituents : subjacency and bounding nodes = 270
  7.2.1 Constructions which give rise to violations of subjacency = 272
  7.2.2 Subjacency is only a constraint on movement = 273
 7.3 The investigation of subjacency in second language acquisition = 275
  7.3.1 Establishing that L2 speakers are sufficiently advanced to test for subjacency = 275
  7.3.2 Early studies of the involvement of subjacency in the construction of L2 mental grammars = 276
  More Advanced Discussion = 288
 7.4 More recent accounts of constraints on movement = 288
  7.4.1 Degrees of ungrammaticality induced by moving constituents too far = 289
  7.4.2 The Empty Category Principle and Relativized Minimality = 293
  More Advanced Discussion = 295
 7.5 Reconsidering whether L2 speakers' mental grammars are sensitive to constraints on movement = 295
  7.5.1 Findings showing that L2 learners are sensitive to 'strong' and 'weak' constraints on movement = 297
  7.5.2 An argument that L2 learners may be having difficulty with parameter settings = 300
  7.5.3 Summary of the findings of studies of L2 learners' knowledge of constraints on movement = 303
  More Advanced Discussion = 304
 7.6 Binding constraints on anaphors = 304
  7.6.1 The descriptive facts of the binding of anaphors in English = 304
  7.6.2 Binding domains and binding principle A = 307
  7.6.3 Anaphor binding in second language grammars = 311
  7.6.4 Summary of section 7.6 = 316
 7.7 Summary of chapter 7 = 317
 7.8 Exercises = 318
 7.9 Further reading = 322
8 The Construction of a Theory of Second Language Syntax : Some Issues and Controversies = 325
 8.1 Introduction = 325
 8.2 Modularity and the interpretation of L2 performance data = 328
  8.2.1 The modularity of the language faculty = 328
  8.2.2 How different interpretations of the syntax-lexicon relation can affect the interpretation of L2 development = 333
  8.2.3 Significant and insignificant properties of performance data = 334
  More Advanced Discussion = 335
 8.3 Issues concerning initial-state L2 grammars = 335
  8.3.1 Weak continuity and 'bootstrapping' accounts of the initial state = 336
  8.3.2 Strong continuity and 'full access' accounts of the initial state = 338
  8.3.3 Summary of section 8.3 = 342
  More Advanced Discussion = 343
 8.4 Issues concerning transitional-state L2 grammars = 343
  8.4.1 Two aspects of transitional-state grammars in need of explanation = 343
  8.4.2 Theories which highlight the significance of overt morphology in transitional-state grammars = 344
  8.4.3 Theories which question the significance of overt morphology in transitional-state grammars = 348
  8.4.4 Summary of section 8.4 = 352
  More Advanced Discussion = 353
 8.5 Issues concerning final-state L2 grammars = 353
  8.5.1 A critical period for language acquisition? = 353
  8.5.2 Differing views on a critical period for UG-determined knowledge in second languages = 355
  8.5.3 Summary of section 8.5 = 359
 8.6 Summary of chapter 8 = 359
 8.7 Conclusion = 360
 8.8 Exercises = 361
 8.9 Further reading = 362
References = 365
Index = 378


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