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Translation : the interpretive model

Translation : the interpretive model (Loan 11 times)

Material type
단행본
Personal Author
Lederer, Marianne. Larche, Ninon.
Title Statement
Translation : the interpretive model / Marianne Lederer ; translated by Ninon Larche.
Publication, Distribution, etc
Manchester ;   Northampton, MA :   St. Jerome Pub. ,   c2003.  
Physical Medium
239 p. ; 22 cm.
ISBN
1900650614 (pbk. : alk. paper)
Bibliography, Etc. Note
Includes bibliographical references (p. [232]-236) and indexes.
Subject Added Entry-Topical Term
Translating and interpreting.
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008 030103s2003 enk b 001 0 eng
010 ▼a 2003000121
020 ▼a 1900650614 (pbk. : alk. paper)
035 ▼a (KERIS)REF000010151225
040 ▼a DLC ▼c DLC ▼d DLC ▼d 211009
041 1 ▼a eng ▼h fre
050 0 0 ▼a P306 ▼b .L3913 2003
082 0 0 ▼a 418/.02 ▼2 22
090 ▼a 418.02 ▼b L473tE
100 1 ▼a Lederer, Marianne.
240 1 0 ▼a Traduction aujourd'hui. ▼l English
245 1 0 ▼a Translation : the interpretive model / ▼c Marianne Lederer ; translated by Ninon Larche.
260 ▼a Manchester ; ▼a Northampton, MA : ▼b St. Jerome Pub. , ▼c c2003.
300 ▼a 239 p. ; ▼c 22 cm.
504 ▼a Includes bibliographical references (p. [232]-236) and indexes.
650 0 ▼a Translating and interpreting.
700 1 ▼a Larche, Ninon.
945 ▼a KINS

Holdings Information

No. Location Call Number Accession No. Availability Due Date Make a Reservation Service
No. 1 Location Main Library/Western Books/ Call Number 418.02 L473tE Accession No. 111400182 Availability Available Due Date Make a Reservation Service B M

Contents information

Author Introduction

Marianne Lederer(지은이)

<번역의 오늘>

Nino Larche(옮긴이)

Information Provided By: : Aladin

Table of Contents

Introduction to English Translation

Foreword


Part I: The Theoretical Aspects of Translation

 

Chapter 1: Translation through Interpretation

 

1.1. The three levels of translation
1.2. Interpreting
1.3. The oral and the written
1.4. The oral origins of the interpretive explanation of translation
1.5. What is interpretation?
1.5.1. Deverbalization
1.5.2. Sense
1.5.3. The immediate grasp of sense
1.5.4. Units of sense
1.6. The written form
1.7. Understanding
1.7.1. Understanding the linguistic component
1.7.2. Understanding what is implicit
1.7.3. Cognitive inputs
1.8. Expression
1.8.1. Reverbalization
1.8.2. The verification stage
1.8.3. Identical contents, equivalent forms


Chapter 2: Equivalence and correspondence

 

2.1. Equivalence and correspondence
2.1.1. What is equivalence?
2.1.2. What is correspondence?
2.2. Translation by equivalence
2.2.1. Cognitive equivalence
2.2.2. Affective equivalence
2.2.3. The global nature of equivalence
2.2.4. Explicit or synecdoche
2.2.5. The spirit of a language and the creation of equivalents
2.2.6. How to evaluate equivalence?
2.3. Correspondences which are appropriate when translating texts
2.3.1. Words chosen deliberately
2.3.2. Enumerations
2.3.3. Technical terms
2.3.4. Polysemy and actualization
2.3.5. The various forms of translation by correspondence
2.4. Faithfulness and freedom

 

Chapter 3: Language and Translation

 

3.1. Linguistics and translation
3.1.1. Structural linguistics
3.1.2. Generative linguistics
3.1.3. Communication and the interactionist approach
3.2. Langue, parole and text: some definitions
3.3. Macro-signs and hypotheses of senses
3.4. Interpretation
3.5. Two demonstrations of interpretation
3.5.1. Interpretation from the actor
3.5.2. Interpretation made explicit

 

Part II: The Practice of Translation


Chapter 4: The Practical Problems of Translation

 

4.1. A few problems observed in practice
4.1.1. The absence of deverbalization
4.1.2. Deverbalization, a methodological issue
4.1.3. The translation unit
4.1.4. Faithfulness
4.1.5. The transfer of culture

 

Chapter 5: Translation and the Teaching of Languages

5.1. The natural tendency of all learners
5.2. Comparative studies and the teaching of translation
5.3. The awkward position of translation
5.4. Translation into the foreign language (thA¨me) and translation into the mother tongue (version
5.4.1. Translation into the foreign language (thA¨me)
5.4.2. Translation into the mother tongue (version)
5.5. How to improve the language skills of the would-be-translator
5.5.1 The language skills course
5.5.2. The self-study brochure
5.6.The teaching of translation

 

Chapter 6: Translation into the Foreign Language

 

6.1. Into which language should one translate?
6.2. The limits of translation into the foreign language
6.3. Acceptability in translation
6.3.1. The complementarity between the specialist reader and the foreign language translation
6.3.2. Foreign language translation and its cultural adaptation to the reader
6.3.3. The general public and translation into a foreign language

 

Chapter 7 Machine Translation versus Human Translation

 

7.1. An historical overview of machine translation
7.2. Machine translation today
7.2.1. Fully automatic machine translation
7.2.2. Human intervention
7.3. How the machine understands languages
7.3.1. Lexical data
7.3.2. Transformational rules
7.3.3. Parsing
7.4. Comparing humans and machines
7.4.1. The differences
7.4.2. The similarities
7.4.3. Real world knowledge and contextual knowledge
7.5. Machines move closer to humans
7.5.1. Knowledge bases
7.5.2. Neural networks
7.6. Machine-aided human translation

 

Afterword


Appendix 1 Cannery Row

Appendix 2 The Woman behind the Woman


Information Provided By: : Aladin

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