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Concepts in kinesiology 2nd ed

Concepts in kinesiology 2nd ed

자료유형
단행본
개인저자
Groves, Richard. Camaione, David N.
서명 / 저자사항
Concepts in kinesiology / Richard Groves, David N. Camaione.
판사항
2nd ed.
발행사항
Philadelphia :   Saunders College Pub. ,   c1983.  
형태사항
xii, 323 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
ISBN
0030623723 (pbk.)
일반주제명
Kinesiology. Kinesiology -- Problems, exercises, etc.
000 00768namuu2200241 a 4500
001 000045262402
005 20060601175140
008 060601s1983 paua 000 0 eng
010 ▼a 82060502
020 ▼a 0030623723 (pbk.)
040 ▼a DLC ▼c DLC ▼d DLC ▼d 211010 ▼d 211010
050 0 0 ▼a QP303 ▼b .G76 1983
082 0 4 ▼a 612/.76 ▼2 21
090 ▼a 612.76 ▼b G884c2
100 1 ▼a Groves, Richard.
245 1 0 ▼a Concepts in kinesiology / ▼c Richard Groves, David N. Camaione.
250 ▼a 2nd ed.
260 ▼a Philadelphia : ▼b Saunders College Pub. , ▼c c1983.
300 ▼a xii, 323 p. : ▼b ill. ; ▼c 24 cm.
650 0 ▼a Kinesiology.
650 0 ▼a Kinesiology ▼v Problems, exercises, etc.
700 1 ▼a Camaione, David N.

소장정보

No. 소장처 청구기호 등록번호 도서상태 반납예정일 예약 서비스
No. 1 소장처 의학도서관/보존서고3/ 청구기호 612.76 G884c2 등록번호 141065778 도서상태 대출가능 반납예정일 예약 서비스 B

컨텐츠정보

목차


CONTENTS
SECTION ONE APPLIED ANATOMY
 Planes and Axes = 3
  Concept 1 Three planes pass through the human body = 5
  Concept 2 Human motion is described from the anatomical position = 7
  Concent 3 An axis of motion occupies two planes = 9
 Muscles = 13
  Concept 4 The functioning of a motor unit illustrates the relationship between the nervous and muscular systems = 15
  Concept 5 Muscles arc subject to isometric and isotonic contractions = 17
  Concept 6 Isotonic muscle contractions may be concentric, eccentric, or isokinetic = 19
  Concept 7 Arrangement of muscle fibers into fusiform or pennate designs determines muscle action = 21
  Concept 8 Muscles which span a joint act at that joint. There are single-joint, two-Joint, and multi-joint muscles = 23
  Concept 9 Muscle fibers are classified into two general physiological types : fast-twitch fibers (pale) and slow-twitch fibers (dark) = 25
  Concept 10 An inverse relationship exists between the mechanical and physiological advantages of muscle = 27
  Concept 11 Muscles may act as "spurt" or "shunt" muscles = 29
  Concept 12 A muscle may play one of many roles during joint movement = 51
  Concept 13 Human skeletal muscles often play a stabilizing role = 33
  Concept 14 Muscles may play the roles of true synergist and helping synergist = 35
  Concept 15 Muscles may pull from either direction, a concept referred to as functional reversibility = 37
  Concept 16 The brachialis muscle is called the "true flexor of the elbow = 39
  Concept 17 Taut hamstrings can limit body flexibility = 41
  Concept 18 Three basic hand positions are used to perform chin-ups = 43
  Concept 19 For efficient motor acts, muscles must possess sufficient strength, endurance, and flexibility = 45
 Joints = 47
  Concept 20 Kinesiologists classify Joints according to the degree of movement they possess = 49
  Concept 21 Six types of diarthrodial joints exist in the human body = 51
  Concept 22 An inverse relationship exists between mobility and stability in human joints = 53
  Concept 23 Only three basic movements occur in the human body-bending, stretching, and twisting = 55
  Concept 24 Movements at the glenohumeral Joint are accompanied by accommodating movements of the scapula and clavicle = 57
 Kinesthesis = 59
  Concept 25 Reflexes for skeletal muscles are classified into two main categories-exteroceptive and proprioceptive = 61
  Concept 26 The muscle spindle is a proprioceptor = 63
  Concept 27 The stretch (postural) reflex is a proprioceptive reflex = 69
  Concept 28 Kinesthesis is reinforced by visual information = 67
SECTION TWO THE PRODUCTION OF MOTION
 Work, Power, and Energy = 71
  Concept 29 Work is expressed mechanically as imparting a force over a given distance in the direction of the force = 73
  Concept 30 Power is expressed as work per unit of time = 75
  Concept 31 Two types of mechanical energy exist : potential and kinetic = 77
 Force = 79
  Concept 32 All forces possess specific properties : four are identified = 81
  Concept 33 Muscles cause movement at the joints by pulling on bones = 85
  Concept 34 To begin a motor activity, a force must be produced within the body to overcome inertia = 87
  Concept 35 Desired movement is often the result of the summation of forces = 89
  Concept 36 Centrifugal force involves a special application of the law of inertia = 91
  Concept 37 Three methods of inducing rotation in an object exist = 93
  Concept 38 Force must be applied in the direction of the intended motion to be effective = 95
 Levers = 97
  Concept 39 Three classes of levers are involved in human movement = 99
  Concept 40 Certain mechanical factors undergo reductions or gains in lever systems = 101
  Concept 41 The elbow joint is an example where all three classes of levers are found = 103
  Concept 42 Adding external weight can change the class of a lever = 105
  Concept 43 Movement occurs when levers arc unbalanced = 107
  Concept 44 Identification of the true force arm and the true resistance arm clearly interprets the law of levers = 109
  Concept 45 The wheel and axle and fixed pulley machines of the musculoskeletal system are simply special cases of the lever system = 113
 Torque = 115
  Concept 46 Torque is the magnitude of twist around an axis of rotation = 117
  Concept 47 Motion can only occur at joints when levers are unbalanced = 119
  Concept 48 Muscular contraction (force) results in torque at human joints = 123
  Concept 49 A resistance (force of gravity) can cause torque at human joints = 123
  Concept 50 Additional muscle force is needed to move a joint when the length of the true resistance arm or the amount of resistance is increased = 125
  Concept 51 Forces acting on joints can be divided into two components : rotatory and nonrotatory = 127
  Concept 52 Nonrotatory components of muscle force (pull) and resistance yield "undesired" actions = 131
  Concept 53 The angle of pull of a muscle changes as joint movement occurs = 133
  Concept 54 The angle of pull of a muscle subdivides the total force of a contracting muscle into two components = 137
  Concept 55 The human body is mechanically inefficient with respect to force production = 139
  Concept 56 The behavior of levers can be explained in terms of moment of force and moment of inertia = 143
  Concept 57 Reducing the length of a moment of inertia produces more efficient joint movements = 147
 Motion = 149
  Concept 58 The human body exhibits two types of motion; translatory (linear) and angular = 151
  Concept 59 Human locomotion is translatory motion resultingfromangular motion at the force-producing joints = 153
  Concept 60 A joint exhibits angular motion, while the distal end of a limb may exhibit angular and/or linear motion = 155
  Concept 61 A greater linear velocity exists at the distal end of a longer lever = 157
  Concept 62 Walking and running demonstrate the alternating action of the upper and lower limbs = 159
  Concept 63 Many motor activities involve the principle of continuity of motion = 163
 Friction = 165
  Concept 64 A force that modifies motion is frictional force = 167
  Concept 65 In the absence of faction, horizontal movement is impossible = 169
  Concept 66 The coefficient of sliding friction is less than that of starting friction = 171
  Concept 67 The starting positions for many motor skills demand sufficient friction = 173
  Concept 68 Running in sand or mud is difficult = 175
  Concept 69 A second force that modifies motion is fluid force = 177
 Momentum = 179
  Concept 70 Momentum is the product of the mass and velocity of an object = 181
  Concept 71 Changes in momentum usually occur because of changes in velocity rather than mass = 183
  Concept 72 Momentum at the end of a long lever is greater than at the end of a short lever = 185
  Concept 73 Motor activities incorporate the principle of transfer of momentum = 187
  Concept 74 Impulse is directly related to the concept of momentum = 189
  Concept 75 In motor activities in which the body becomes airborne, transfer of momentum must occur at the instant of takeoff = 191
  Concept 76 Many motor activities require that a performer reduce the momentum of an oncoming object = 193
  Concept 77 Many motor activities require that a performer provide momentum to an object = 195
 Newton's Laws of Motion = 197
  Concept 78 Newton's first law : a body continues in its state of rest or in uniform motion in a straight line except when compelled by impressed force to change that state = 199
  Concept 79 Newton's first law: inertia concerns bodies at rest and bodies in motion = 201
  Concept 80 Newton's first law: inertia is directly proportional to mass = 203
  Concept 81 Newton's first law: a force is necessary to overcome inertia = 205
  Concept 82 Newton's second law: the rate of change of momentum is proportional to the impressed force, and the actual change occurs in the direction in which the force acts = 207
  Concept 83 Newton's second law: the greater the mass of an object, the greater the force needed for acceleration = 209
  Concept 84 Newton's second law: if two forces of different magnitudes are applied to objects of equal mass, the greater force will provide greater acceleration = 211
  Concept 85 Newton's second law: the law of acceleration aids our understanding of the law of free-falling bodies = 213
  Concept 86 Newton's third law: for every action (force), there is always an equal and opposite reaction (force) = 217
  Concept 87 Newton's third law; the effect of a performer's action against the earth cannot be observed = 219
  Concept 88 Newton's third law; the principle of action-reaction helps to identify the force that propels the human body during locomotion = 221
  Concept 89 Newton's third law: the action-reaction principle is observable when a performer is airborne = 223
 Projectiles = 225
  Concept 90 A projectile's path is influenced by certain forces and the angle and height of projection = 227
  Concept 91 The trajectory of a projectile involves height, time, and & distance = 229
  Concept 92 A projectile's path is influenced by impact and the effects of spin = 231
 Center of Gravity = 235
  Concept 93 Understanding the location of the center of gravity in the human body aids our understanding of movement = 235
  Concept 94 Each human being has a different specific location for his or her center of gravity = 239
  Concept 95 The location of the center of gravity in the body shifts when body parts move = 241
  Concept 96 The location of the center of gravity changes when external weights arc added to the body = 243
 Stability = 245
  Concept 97 The larger the base of support, the greater the stability = 247
  Concept 98 Raising or lowering the center of gravity within the base of support affects stability = 251
  Concept 99 Increasing the size of the base of support in the direction of an oncoming force increases stability = 253
  Concept 100 Stability and mobility arc inversely related = 255
  Concept 101 Motor activities exist in which a performer desires to maintain stability = 257
 Fellow-Through = 259
  Concept 102 Follow-through prevents a loss of linear velocity at the moment of impact or release = 261
  Concept 103 Follow-through prevents injuries caused by the abrupt stopping of a moving body pan = 263
  Concept 104 Follow-through prevents the violation of certain playing rules = 265
  Concept 105 Follow-through provides time to perceive feedback information = 267
SECTION THREE APPLICATION TO SPORT FORMS
 Baseball/SoftbaU = 271
  Concept 106 Baseball/softball sliding uses the principle of receiving impetus = 273
 Basketball = 275
  Concept 107 The Jump shot employs Newton's third law of motion = 275
 Downhill Skiing = 277
  Concept 108 Downhill skiing depends on the force of gravity = 277
 Football = 279
  Concept 109 One foot must be in contact with the ground when a player kicks a football = 279
 Golf = 281
  Concept 110 The full golf swing uses an increased lever system to gain maximum linear velocity of the clubhead = 281
 Gymnastics = 283
  Concept 111 Centrifugal force (inertia) and centripetal force must counterbalance one another during the performance of a giant swing on the horizontal bar = 283
  Concept 112 A floor routine during the free-exercise event uses a number of biomechanical concepts = 285
 Ice Skating = 287
  Concept 113 A whirling figure skater uses changing moments of inertia to control angular velocity = 287
 Starting = 289
  Concept 114 There are some motor activities in which the performer wishes to lose stability in certain starting events = 289
 Swimming = 291
  Concept 115 Effort that does not contribute to the desired result acts as a resistance = 291
  Concept 116 Movement through the water is best achieved by the effective use of a swimmer's arms and legs = 293
  Concept 117 A diver can perform more somersaults in the tuck position, fewer in the pike position, and fewest in the layout position = 295
 Tennis = 297
  Concept 118 Increasing the length of a moment of force produces stronger joint movements when striking (giving impetus to) a tennis ball = 297
  Concept 119 Follow-through places the body in a "ready position" to begin the next tennis skill = 299
 Track and Field = 301
  Concept 120 When the body is in free flight, no amount of maneuvering of body parts can alter the path of the center of gravity = 301
  Concept 121 Centrifugal force (inertia) and centripetal force must counter - balance one another during the hammer throw = 303
  Concept 122 Hurdlers must minimize their time in the air = 305
  Concept 123 The purpose of high jumping is to propel the center of gravity to a height sufficient for good performance = 309
 Volleyball = 313
  Concept 124 The forearm bump pass is an example of receiving impetus (momentum of an object) = 313
  Concept 125 Spiking the ball is an example of giving impetus to an object = 315
 Wrestling = 317
  Concept 126 The use of levers is important to successful wrestling techniques = 317
 Glossary = 319


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