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Neurophysiological basis of movement

Neurophysiological basis of movement (Loan 1 times)

Material type
단행본
Personal Author
Latash, Mark L. , 1953-.
Title Statement
Neurophysiological basis of movement / Mark L. Latash.
Publication, Distribution, etc
Champaign, IL :   Human Kinetics ,   c1998.  
Physical Medium
x, 269 p. : ill. ; 29 cm.
ISBN
0880117567
Bibliography, Etc. Note
Includes bibliographical references and index.
Subject Added Entry-Topical Term
Locomotion. Neurophysiology. Motor ability. Movement disorders.
000 00845pamuu2200277 a 4500
001 000045227094
005 20060203101546
008 970918s1998 ilua b 001 0 eng
010 ▼a 97031920
020 ▼a 0880117567
035 ▼a (KERIS)REF000004583452
040 ▼a DLC ▼c DLC ▼d DLC ▼d 211009
050 0 0 ▼a QP301 ▼b .L364 1998
082 0 0 ▼a 612.7/6 ▼2 21
090 ▼a 612.76 ▼b L351n
100 1 ▼a Latash, Mark L. , ▼d 1953-.
245 1 0 ▼a Neurophysiological basis of movement / ▼c Mark L. Latash.
260 ▼a Champaign, IL : ▼b Human Kinetics , ▼c c1998.
300 ▼a x, 269 p. : ▼b ill. ; ▼c 29 cm.
504 ▼a Includes bibliographical references and index.
650 0 ▼a Locomotion.
650 0 ▼a Neurophysiology.
650 0 ▼a Motor ability.
650 0 ▼a Movement disorders.
945 ▼a KINS

Holdings Information

No. Location Call Number Accession No. Availability Due Date Make a Reservation Service
No. 1 Location Main Library/Western Books/ Call Number 612.76 L351n Accession No. 111348463 Availability Available Due Date Make a Reservation Service B M

Contents information

Table of Contents


CONTENTS

Preface = ⅷ

Introduction = ⅸ

WORLD Ⅰ CELLS = 1

 Chapter 1 Membranes, Particles, and Potentials = 3

  1.1. Complex System Approach = 3

  1.2. The Biological Membrane = 5

  1.3. Movement in a Solution = 6

  1.4. Concentration of Water : Osmosis = 7

  1.5. Movement of Ions = 8

 Chapter 2 Action Potential = 10

  2.1. Creation of Membrane Potential = 10

  2.2. Basic Features of Action Potential = 12

  2.3. Mechanism of Generation of Action Potential = 13

 Chapter 3 Information Conduction and Transmission = 17

  3.1. Conduction of Action Potential = 18

  3.2. Myelinated Fibers = 19

  3.3. The Structure of the Neuron = 20

  3.4. Information Coding in the Nervous System = 22

  3.5. Synaptic Transmission = 22

  3.6. Neurotransmitters = 23

  3.7. Temporal and Spatial Summation = 23

 Chapter 4 The Skeletal Muscle = 26

  4.1. Skeletal Muscle : Structure = 26

  4.2. Mysfilaments = 27

  4.3. Neuromuscular Synapse = 27

  4.4. Mechanism of Contraction = 29

  4.5. Types of Muscle Contraction = 30

  4.6. Elements of Mechanics = 31

  4.7. Force-Length and Force-Velocity Relations = 32

  4.8. External Regimes of Muscle Contraction = 33

 Chapter 5 Receptors = 35

  5.1. General Classification and Properties of Receptors = 35

  5.2. Muscle Spindles = 36

  5.3. The Gamma System = 38

  5.4. Golgi Tendon Organs = 39

  5.5. Other Muscle Receptors = 40

  5.6. Articular Receptors = 40

  5.7. Cutaneous Receptors = 40

  5.8. Where Does the Information Go? = 41

 Chapter 6 Motor Units and Electromyography = 43

  6.1. The Notion of Motor Unit = 43

  6.2. Fast and slow Motor Units = 44

  6.3. The Henneman Principle(Size Principle) = 45

  6.4. Functional Role of Different Motor Unite = 46

  6.5. Electromyography = 47

  6.6. Filtering, Rectification, and Integration = 48

 World-Ⅰ Problems = 51

 World-Ⅰ Recommended Readings = 51

WORLD Ⅱ CONNECTIONS = 53

 Chapter 7 Excitation and Inhibition Within the Spinal Cord = 55

  7.1. The Spinal Cord = 55

  7.2. Excitaiton Within the Central Nervous System = 57

  7.3. Postsynaptic Inhibition = 58

  7.4. Renshaw Cells = 59

  7.5. Ia-Interneurons = 60

  7.6. Presynaptic Inhibition = 61

 Chapter 8 Monosynaptic Reflexes = 64

  8.1. Reflexes = 64

  8.2. Reflex Arc = 64

  8.3. H-Reflexes, T-Reflexes, and M-Response = 65

  8.4. The Effects of Voluntary Muscle Activtion on Monosynaptic Reflexes = 69

  8.5. F-Wave = 69

 Chapter 9 Oligosynaptic and Polysynaptic Reflexes = 71

  9.1. Oligosynaptic Reflexes = 71

  9.2. Polysynaptic Reflexes = 73

  9.3. Flexor Reflex = 74

  9.4. Tonic Stretch Reflex = 74

  9.5. Tonic Vibration Reflex = 76

  9.6. Interaction Among Reflex Pathways = 77

  9.7. Interjoint and Interlimb Reflexes = 79

 Chapter 10 Voluntary Control of a Single Muscle = 80

  10.1. Feedforward and Feedback Control = 80

  10.2. Servo Control = 82

  10.3. The Servo Hypothesis = 83

  10.4. Alphs-Gamma Coactivation = 85

  10.5. Voluntary Activation of Muscles = 85

  10.6. Equilibrium-Point Hypothesis = 85

 Chapter 11 Patterns of Single-Joint Movements = 88

  11.1. Isotonic Movements and Isometric Contractions = 88

  11.2. Performance and Task Parameters = 89

  11.3. Electromyographic Patterns During Single-Joint Isotonic Movements = 91

  11.4. Electromyographic Patterns During Single-Joint Isometric contractions = 94

  11.5. The Dual-Strategy Hypothesis = 96

 Chapter 12 Preprogrammed Reactions = 98

  12.1. Preprogrammed Reactions = 98

  12.2. Preprogrammed Reaction Is Not a Stretch Reflex = 100

  12.3. In Search of the Afferent Source of Preprogrammed Reactions = 100

  12.4. Preprogrammed Reactions During Movement Perturbations = 101

  12.5. Basic Features of Preprogrammed Reactions = 102

  12.6. Preprogrammed Corrections of Vertical Posture = 103

  12.7. Corrective Stumbling Reaction = 104

 World-Ⅱ Problems = 105

 World-Ⅱ Recommended Readings = 105

WORLD Ⅲ STRUCTURES = 107

 Chapter 13 Methods of Brain Study and Elements of the Brain Anatomy = 109

  13.1. Single-Neuron Recording = 109

  13.2. Electroencephalography = 110

  13.3. Evoked Potentials = 111

  13.4. Radiography = 112

  13.5. Computerized Tomography = 112

  13.6. Positron Emission Tomography = 112

  13.7. Magnetic Resonance Imaging = 113

  13.8. Neuroanatomical Tracing = 113

  13.9. Major Brain Structures = 114

 Chapter 14 Cerbral Cortex = 121

  14.1. Cerebral Hemispheres = 121

  14.2. Structure of the Cerebral Cortex = 122

  14.3. Primary Motor and Premotor Areas = 123

  14.4. Inputs to Motor Cortex = 124

  14.5. Outputs of Motor Cortex = 125

  14.6. Preparation for a Voluntary Movement = 126

  14.7. Neuronal Population vectors = 127

 Chapter 15 The Cerebellum = 129

  15.1. Anatomy of the Cerebellum = 129

  15.2. Cerebellar Inputs = 131

  15.3. Cerebellar Outputs = 132

  15.4. Relation of Cerebellar Activity to Voluntary Movement = 135

  15.5. Neuronal Population Vectors = 135

  15.6. The Effects of Cerebellar Lesions = 135

 Chapter 16 The Basal Ganglia = 139

  16.1. Anatomy of the Basal Ganglia = 139

  16.2. Inputs and Outputs of the Basal Ganglia = 140

  16.3. Motor Circuits Involving the Basal Ganglia = 141

  16.4. Activity of the Basal Ganglia During Movements = 142

  16.5. Effects of Lesions of the Basal Ganglia = 143

 Chapter 17 Ascending and Descending Pathways = 145

  17.1. Basic Properties of Neural Pathways = 145

  17.2. Afferent Input to the Spinal Cord = 146

  17.3. Dorsal Column Pathway = 146

  17.4. Spinocervcal Pathway = 147

  17.5. Spinothalamic Tract = 147

  17.6. Spinocerebellar Tracts = 147

  17.7. Spinoreticular Tract = 148

  17.8. Pyramidal Tract = 149

  17.9. Rubrospinal Tract = 150

  17.10. Vestibulospinal Tracts = 150

  17.11. Reticulopinal Tract and Other Descending Tracts = 150

  17.12. Propriospinal Tracts = 151

 Chapter 18 Memory = 152

  18.1. Descartes' Dualism and Cellular Mechanisms of Memory = 152

  18.2. Habituation of Reflexes = 153

  18.3. Learning and Memory = 153

  18.4. Types of Learning = 153

  18.5. Conditioned Reflexes = 154

  18.6. Short-Term and Long-Term Memories = 155

  18.7. Neuronal/Synaptic Mechanisms of Memory? = 155

  18.8. Retrieval of Memory = 156

  18.9. Genetic Code as an Example of Memory = 157

  18.10. Plasticity in the Brain = 157

  18.11. Korsakoff's Syndrome = 157

  18.12. Possible Role of Hippocampus in Memory = 158

  18.13. Spinal Memory = 158

 World-Ⅲ Problems = 160

 World-Ⅲ Recommended Readings = 160

WORLD Ⅳ BEHAVIORS = 161

 Chapter 19 Postural Control = 163

  19.1. Vertical Posture = 163

  19.2. Vestibular System = 164

  19.3. The Role of Vision in Postural Control = 165

  19.4. The Role of Proprioception in Postural Control = 166

  19.5. Anticipatory and Corrective Postural Adjustments = 167

  19.6. The Notion of Postural Synergy = 170

 Chapter 20 Locomotion = 172

  20.1. Two Approaches to Locomotion = 172

  20.2. Central Pattern Generator = 173

  20.3. Locomotor Centers = 173

  20.4. Spinal Locomotion = 175

  20.5. Gait Patterns = 175

  20.6. Corrective Stumbling Reaction = 175

  20.7. Dynamic Pattern Generation = 176

 Chapter 21 Multi-Joint Movement = 179

  21.1. General Features of Targeted Movements = 179

  21.2. Major Problems of Controlling Natural Reaching Movements = 180

  21.3. Spinal Mechanisms of Multi-Joint Coordination : Interjoint Reflexes = 183

  21.4. Spinal Mechanisms of Multi-Joint Coordination : control Variables = 183

  21.5. Supraspinal Mechaisms = 184

  21.6. The Equilibrium-Trajectory Hypothesis = 185

  21.7. What Is Controlled? = 186

 Chapter 22 Vision = 188

  22.1. The Eye = 188

  22.2. Photoreceptors = 188

  22.3. Retina and Optic Nerve = 189

  22.4. Oculomotor Control = 190

  22.5. Central Mechanisms of Visual Perception = 192

  22.6. The Role of Visual Information in Voluntary Movements = 194

 Chapter 23 Kinesthesia = 195

  23.1. Which Physical Variables Are Sensed by Proprioceptors? = 195

  23.2. Peripheral Sources of Kinesthetic Information = 195

  23.3. The Role of the Motor Command in Kinesthesia = 198

  23.4. Where Does the Information Go? = 199

  23.5. Kinesthetic Illusions = 201

  23.6. Pain = 201

 Chapter 24 Fatigue = 204

  24.1. Fatigue and Its Contributors = 204

  24.2. Muscular Mechanisms of Fatigue = 205

  24.3. Spinal Mechanisms of Fatigue = 206

  24.4. Supraspinal Mechaisms of Fatigue = 206

  24.5. Adaptive Changes During Fatigue = 206

  24.6. Abnormal Fatigue = 207

 World-Ⅳ Problems = 209

 World-Ⅳ Recommended Readings = 209

WORLD Ⅴ DISORDERS = 211

 Chapter 25 Spasticity = 213

  25.1. Challenges of Clinical Studies = 213

  25.2. Spinal Cord Injury = 213

  25.3. Signs and Symptoms of Spasticity = 214

  25.4. Treatment of Spasticity = 217

  25.5. Multiple Sclersis = 220

 Chapter 26 Parkinson's Disease and Dystonia = 221

  26.1. Clinical Features of Parkison's Disease = 221

  26.2. Voluntary Movements in Parkinson's Disease = 223

  26.3. Differences in Anticipatory Adjustments and in Preprogrammed Reactions = 224

  26.4. Changes in Segmental Reflexes = 226

  26.5. Possible Mechanisms = 226

  26.6. Dystonia = 226

 Chapter 27 Implications for Motor Rehabilitation = 229

  27.1. Sources of Variability of Voluntary Movements = 229

  27.2. Changes in the Central Nervous system Priorities = 230

  27.3. Central Nervous System Plasticity = 232

  27.4. Adaptive Changes in Motor Patterns of Atypical Individuals = 232

  27.5. Amputation = 233

  27.6. Down Syndrome = 233

  27.7. Practical Considerations = 236

 World-Ⅴ Problems = 237

 World-Ⅴ Recommended Readings = 237

Laboratories = 239

 Introduction = 239

 Laboratory 1 = 241

 Laboratory 2 = 244

 Laboratory 3 = 246

 Laboratory 4 = 249

 Laboratory 5 = 251

 Laboratory 6 = 254

Glossary = 256

Index = 263

About the Author = 269



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