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Formal semantics: an introduction

Formal semantics: an introduction (Loan 27 times)

Material type
단행본
Personal Author
Cann, Ronnie.
Title Statement
Formal semantics: an introduction / Ronnie Cann.
Publication, Distribution, etc
Cambridge ;   New York, NY, USA :   Cambridge University Press ,   1993.  
Physical Medium
xvii, 344 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
Series Statement
Cambridge textbooks in linguistics
ISBN
0521374634 (hardback) 0521376106 (pbk.)
Bibliography, Etc. Note
Includes bibliographical references (p. 333-338) and index.
Subject Added Entry-Topical Term
Semantics. Semantics (Philosophy)
000 00873camuu2200265 a 4500
001 000045164752
005 20050426111301
008 920309s1993 enka b 00 0 eng
010 ▼a 92008538
020 ▼a 0521374634 (hardback)
020 ▼a 0521376106 (pbk.)
035 ▼a KRIC00297457
040 ▼a 211032 ▼c 211032 ▼d 211009
050 0 0 ▼a P325 ▼b .C28 1993
082 0 0 ▼a 401/.43 ▼2 20
090 ▼a 401.43 ▼b C224f
100 1 ▼a Cann, Ronnie.
245 1 0 ▼a Formal semantics: ▼b an introduction / ▼c Ronnie Cann.
260 ▼a Cambridge ; ▼a New York, NY, USA : ▼b Cambridge University Press , ▼c 1993.
300 ▼a xvii, 344 p. : ▼b ill. ; ▼c 24 cm.
490 0 ▼a Cambridge textbooks in linguistics
504 ▼a Includes bibliographical references (p. 333-338) and index.
650 0 ▼a Semantics.
650 0 ▼a Semantics (Philosophy)

Holdings Information

No. Location Call Number Accession No. Availability Due Date Make a Reservation Service
No. 1 Location Main Library/Western Books/ Call Number 401.43 C224f Accession No. 111318110 Availability Available Due Date Make a Reservation Service B M
No. 2 Location Main Library/Western Books/ Call Number 401.43 C224f Accession No. 412912481 Availability Available Due Date Make a Reservation Service B M

Contents information

Table of Contents

CONTENTS
List of figures page = xii
Preface = xiii
List of symbols = xv
1 INTRODUCTION = 1
  1.1 Semantics and semantic theory = 1
    1.1.1 Compositionality = 2
    1.1.2 Meaning relations = 5
    1.1.3 Amibiguity = 8
    1.1.4 Denotation = 10
  1.2 Interpretation and representation= 13
    1.2.1 Truth-conditions = 15
    1.2.2 Formatisation, models and sets = 17
  1.3 Beyond truth-conditions = 19
    1.3.1 Knowledge, behaviour and use = 19
    1.3.2 Context = 22
  1.4 A note on method = 23
  1.5 Further reading = 25
2 PREDICATES AND ARGUMENTS = 27
  2.1 Translating English into a logical language = 27
    2.1.1 The syntax of Lp = 27
    2.1.2 A grammar fragment for English = 28
    2.1.3 The translation procedure = 32
  2.2 Interpreting Lp = 38
    2.2.1 Individuals and identity = 41
    2.2.2 A little light set theory = 44
    2.2.3 Interpreting predicates = 47
    2.2.4 Finishing Up = 52
  2.3 Further reading = 53
3 NEGATION AND CO-ORDINATION = 54
  3.1 Compound sentences = 54
  3.2 Complex formulae = 55
  3.3 Interpretation = 60
    3.3.1 Negation = 60
    3.3.2 Conjunction = 63
    3.3.3 Disjunction = 67
    3.3.4 Implication = 70
    3.3.5 Equivalence = 73
  3.4 Formal interpretation = 74
    3.4.1 Formal models = 75
    3.4.2 Model theory = 78
  3.5 Further reading = 81
4 TYPE THEORY = 82
  4.1 Verb phrases and other constituents = 82
  4.2 A typed logical language = 83
    4.2.1 Semantic types = 83
    4.2.2 Translating verb phrases = 98
  4.3 More set theory = 93
    4.3.1 Relations and functions = 93
    4.3.2 Sets again = 96
  4.4 Interpreting Lt ype = 98
    4.4.1 Denotation = 99
    4.4.2 Revising the theory = 103
  4.5 Adverbs = 107
  4.6 Further reading = 111
5 THE LAMBDA OPERATOR = 112
  5.1 The passive = 112
  5.2 Introducing the lambda operator = 115
    5.2.1 Extending Lt ype = 116
    5.2.2 Interpreting lambda expressions = 119
    5.2.3 The passive again = 126
  5.3 Generalising lambda expressions = 127
  5.4 Reviewing co-orditiation = 136
    5.4.1 Sentential co-ordination = 136
    5.4.2 Co-ordinating other categories = 143
  5.5 Further reading = 149
6 QUANTIFICATION = 150
  6.1 The variety of noun phrases = 150
  6.2 Introducing the logical quantifiers = 151
    6.2.1 The quantifiers = 152
    6.2.2 Interpreting LQ = 154
    6.2.3 Quantification and negation = 158
  6.3 A compositional approach = 159
    6.3.1 Translating quantifier pronouns = 159
    6.3.2 Complex NPs = 162
    6.3.3Nominal modifiers = 169
  6.4 Proper names and definite descfiptions = 172
  6.5 Two problems = 177
    6.5.1 Type raising = 177
    6.5.2 Scope ambiguities = 180
  6.6 Gencralised quantifiers = 187
  6.7 Further Reading = 195
7 INFERENCE = 197
  7.1 Making inferences = 197
  7.2 Logical deduction = 200
    7.2 1 Using the connectives = 204
    7.2.2 Reasoning with quantifiers = 210
  7.3 Lexical meaning = 215
  7.4 Noii-truth-conditional aspects of the connectives = 224
    7.4.1 And = 224
    7.4.2 Or = 276
    7.4.3 If = 229
  7.5 Further Reading = 231
8 TIME, TENSE AND ASPECT = 233
  8.1 Temporal contingency = 233
  8.2 Time = 233
    8.2.1 Intervals of time = 234
    8.2.2 Temporal models = 236
  8.3 Tense = 241
    8.3.1 Past, present and future = 241
    8.3.2 Complex tenses = 246
  8.4 Simple aspect = 251
    8.4.1 Perfective and imperfective = 251
    8.4.2 States and actions = 256
  8.5 Scope ambiguities = 259
  8.6 Ftirther reading = 262
9 POSSIBLE WORLDS = 263
  9.1 Where entailments fail = 263
  9.2 Intension and extension = 267
  9.3 Introducing other worlds = 269
    9.3.1 Simple modality = 270
    9.3.2 Accessible worlds = 276
  9.4 Further reading = 281
10 INTENSIONAL SEMANTICS = 282
  10.1 Modelling intensions = 282
  10.2 The intensional language LI L = 288
    10.2.1 Intensional expressions ... = 289
    10.2.2 ... and their interpretation = 293
  10.3 Interpreting opaque contexts = 299
    10.3.1 Oblique transitive verbs = 299
    10.3.2 Control verbs = 306
    10.3.3 Propositional attitudes = 308
  10.4 Two problems = 315
    10.4.1 Intensional equivalence = 316
    10.4.2 Cross-world reference = 319
  10.5 Postscript = 320
  10.6 Further reading = 322
Answers to selected exercises = 323
References = 333
Index = 339

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