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A political theory of rights

A political theory of rights (Loan 6 times)

Material type
단행본
Personal Author
Ingram, Attracta.
Title Statement
A political theory of rights / Attracta Ingram.
Publication, Distribution, etc
Oxford [England] :   Clarendon Press ;   New York :   Oxford University Press ,   1994.  
Physical Medium
xi, 232 p. ; 23 cm.
ISBN
0198279019 0198279639 (pbk.)
Bibliography, Etc. Note
Includes bibliographical references (p. [221]-228) and index.
Subject Added Entry-Topical Term
Human rights. Autonomy.
비통제주제어
Rights ,,
000 00810camuu2200253 a 4500
001 000045119272
005 20040916140852
008 940218s1994 enk b 001 0 eng
010 ▼a 94008692
020 ▼a 0198279019
020 ▼a 0198279639 (pbk.)
040 ▼a DLC ▼c DLC ▼d IAY ▼d UKM ▼d NGU ▼d 211009
050 0 0 ▼a JC571 ▼b .I489 1994
082 0 0 ▼a 323 ▼2 21
090 ▼a 323 ▼b I54p
100 1 ▼a Ingram, Attracta.
245 1 2 ▼a A political theory of rights / ▼c Attracta Ingram.
260 ▼a Oxford [England] : ▼b Clarendon Press ; ▼a New York : ▼b Oxford University Press , ▼c 1994.
300 ▼a xi, 232 p. ; ▼c 23 cm.
504 ▼a Includes bibliographical references (p. [221]-228) and index.
650 0 ▼a Human rights.
650 0 ▼a Autonomy.
653 0 ▼a Rights

Holdings Information

No. Location Call Number Accession No. Availability Due Date Make a Reservation Service
No. 1 Location Main Library/Western Books/ Call Number 323 I54p Accession No. 111293074 Availability In loan Due Date 2022-08-08 Make a Reservation Available for Reserve R Service M

Contents information

Table of Contents


CONTENTS
1. Introduction = 1
 1.1. Rights: The Issue of Sense = 1
 1.2. General Aims = 3
 1.3. The Importance of Individuals = 7
 1.4. Misgivings about Rights = 12
 1.5. Natural Law and Natural Rights = 13
 1.6. The Principle of Self-Ownership = 17
PART Ⅰ. SELF-OWNERSHIP: THE PROPRIETARY CONCEPTION OF RIGHTS
 2. What is Self-Ownership? = 25
  2.1. Introduction = 25
  2.2. What is Property? = 27
  2.3. Full Liberal Ownership = 29
  2.4. The Meaning of Self-Ownership = 32
  2.5. Must Self-Ownership be Libertarian? = 34
  2.6. Self-Ownership: Sources of Scepticism = 38
  2.7. Summary = 41
 3. Self-Ownership and World Ownership = 43
  3.1. Introduction = 43
  3.2. Rights to Resources and Varieties of World Ownership = 45
  3.3. Locke's Theory of Just Acquisition = 48
  3.4. Nozick's Theory of Just Acquisition = 54
  3.5. The Steiner Constitution = 59
  3.6. Conclusion = 65
 4. Proprietary Rights and Self-Command = 66
  4.1. Introduction = 66
  4.2. A Conjectural History of Proprietary Rights = 67
  4.3. The Withering Away of Rights: (ⅰ) Totalitarianism = 72
  4.4. The Withering Away of Rights: (ⅱ) Full Compliance = 75
  4.5. A Right to Change Society? = 79
  4.6. Fixing the System of Freedom and Constraint = 83
PART Ⅱ. SELF-GOVERNMENT: THE POLITICAL CONCEPTION OF RIGHTS
 5. The Moral Basis of Rights = 93
  5.1. Introduction = 93
  5.2. A New Beginning = 95
  5.3. Locating the Moral Basis of Rights = 97
  3.4. Autonomy = 99
  5.5. Autonomy as Personal and Political = 106
  5.6. The Interplay of Personal and Political Autonomy = 109
  5.7. The Good of Autonomy = 112
  5.8. Our Sense of Autonomy = 115
  5.9. Conclusion = 116
 6. Constructing a Theory of Rights: Ideal Conversations = 118
  6.1. Introduction = 118
  6.2. Discourse and Contract = 119
  6.3. Habermas on Ideal Speech = 124
  6.4. Larmore's Neutral justification = 128
  6.5. Ackerman's Constrained Conversation = 130
  6.6. Political Liberalism = 135
  6.7. Summary = 139
 7. Constructing a Theory of Rights: Building in Conversational Constraints = 141
  7.1. Introduction = 141
  7.2. Can Ideal Discourse Bind? = 143
  7.3. Autonomy-Regarding Constraints: Personal = 146
  7.4. Autonomy-Regarding Constraints: Political = 148
  7.5. The Interdependence of Autonomous Human Beings = 152
  7.6. Autonomy against Self-Ownership = 157
  7.7. From Modus Vivendi Politics to Expressivism = 164
  7.8. Summary = 167
 8. Principles of Self-Government = 168
  8.1. Introduction = 168
  8.2. Principles of Self-Government = 171
  8.3. Summary = 189
 9. Rights as Political = 193
  9.1. Introduction = 193
  9.2. The Political Understanding of Rights = 193
  9.3. Human Rights = 198
  9.4. Rights Scepticism = 202
  9.5. Talents and Bodily Integrity = 209
  9.6. Rights and Solidarity = 212
  9.7. Summary = 213
 10. Conclusion = 215
  10.1. Making Sense of Rights = 215
  10.2. Determining What Rights We Have = 216
  10.3. Why the Institution of Rights? = 217
  10.4. Concluding Remarks = 218
References = 221
Index = 229


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