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New methods of food preservation

New methods of food preservation

Material type
단행본
Personal Author
Gould, Grahame Warwick.
Title Statement
New methods of food preservation / edited by G.W. Gould.
Publication, Distribution, etc
London :   Blackie Academic & Professional,   1995.  
Physical Medium
xix, 324 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
ISBN
0751400483
Bibliography, Etc. Note
Includes bibliographical references and index.
000 00560camuuu200181 a 4500
001 000000922937
005 19990122095907.0
008 970214s1995 enka b 001 0 eng d
020 ▼a 0751400483
040 ▼a 244002 ▼c 244002
049 0 ▼l 151033734
082 0 4 ▼a 641.4 ▼2 20
090 ▼a 641.4 ▼b N532
245 0 0 ▼a New methods of food preservation / ▼c edited by G.W. Gould.
260 ▼a London : ▼b Blackie Academic & Professional, ▼c 1995.
300 ▼a xix, 324 p. : ▼b ill. ; ▼c 24 cm.
504 ▼a Includes bibliographical references and index.
700 1 ▼a Gould, Grahame Warwick.

Holdings Information

No. Location Call Number Accession No. Availability Due Date Make a Reservation Service
No. 1 Location Sejong Academic Information Center/Science & Technology/ Call Number R 641.4 N532 Accession No. 151033734 Availability Available Due Date Make a Reservation Service

Contents information

Table of Contents


CONTENTS
Overview / G. W. GOULD = XV
1 Principles and applications of Hurdle technology / L. LEISTNER = 1
 1.1 Introduction = 1
 1.2 Examples of the hurdle effect
  1.2.1 Fermented foods = 1
  1.2.2 Shelf atable products(SSP) = 1
  1.2.3 Intermediate moisture foods(IMF) = 5
 1.3 Behaviour of microorganisms during food preservation = 8
  1.3.1 Homeostasis of microorganisms = 8
  1.3.2 Multi-target preservation of foods = 9
  1.3.3 Stress reactions and metabolic exhaustion = 9
 1.4 Total quality of foods = 10
  1.4.1 Optimal range of hurdles = 11
  1.4.2 Potential safety and quality hurdles = 12
  1.4.3 User guide to food design = 12
 1.5 Application of hurdle technology in less developed countries = 15
  1.5.1 Fruits of latin America = 15
  1.5.2 Dairy product of India = 17
  1.5.3 Meat products of China = 18
 1.6 Future potential = 19
 References = 20
2 Bacteriocins : natural antimicrobials from microorganisms / C. HILL = 22
 2.1 Introduction = 22
  2.1.1 Historical = 23
 2.2 Bacteriocin structure and function = 23
  2.2.1 Lantibiotics = 23
  2.2.2 Small heat-stable bacteriocins = 26
  2.2.3 large heat-labile bacteriocins = 28
 2.3 Genetics of bacteriocins from LAB = 29
  2.3.1 Genetic organization of bacteriocin operons = 29
  2.3.2 Genetic location of bacteriocin genes = 31
 2.4 Application of bacteriocins in food systems = 31
  2.4.1 Dairy industry = 32
  2.4.2 Canning industry = 34
  2.4.3 Meat industry = 34
  2.4.4 Wine and beer = 35
  2.4.5 Sauerkraut = 35
 2.5 Future prospects for bacteriocins 36
 References = 38
3 Natural antimicrobials from animals / R. G. BOARD = 40
 3.1 Introduction = 40
 3.2 The phagosome = 44
 3.3 Antibiotic peptides = 45
  3.3.1 Biological role = 45
  3.3.2 Chemical attributes and spectrum of action = 46
 3.4 Protein amendment and production of antibiotic peptides = 49
  3.4.1 Iron = 50
  3.4.2 Avidin = 51
 3.5 The lactoperoxidase system(Lps) = 52
 3.6 Lysozymes = 53
 3.7 Prospects = 54
 References = 55
4 Natural antimicrobials from plants / G. J. E. NYCHAS = 58
 4.1 Introduction = 58
 4.2 Phytoalexins = 59
 4.3 Organic acids = 60
 4.4 Essential oils = 60
 4.5 Phenolics, pigments and related compounds = 67
  4.5.1 Factors affecting antimicrobial action = 75
 4.6 Modes of action = 77
 4.7 health and legislative aspects = 81
 4.8 Conclusions = 82
 References = 83
5 Food irradiation : current status and future prospects / P. LOAHARANU = 90
 5.1 Introduction = 90
 5.2 Development of national regulations = 90
 5.3 Technical advantages and limitations of food irradiation = 91
  5.3.1 Techno-economic advantages = 92
 5.4 Limitations of food irradiation = 98
  5.4.1 Technical = 98
  5.4.2 Infrastructure and economics = 99
  5.4.3 Consumer concerns = 99
 5.5 Consumer acceptance of irradiated food = 100
  5.5.1 Consumer attitude surveys = 100
  5.5.2 Market testings and retail sales of irradiated food = 102
 5.6 Commercial applications of food irradiation = 103
 5.7 International co-operation in the field of food irradiation = 105
  5.7.1 Co-operation among FAO, IAEA and WHO = 106
  5.7.2 Co-operation With the Codex Alimentarius Commission = 107
  5.7.3 Co-operation leading to international trade in irradiated food = 108
 5.8 Conclusions = 109
 References = 109
6 Microwave processing / J. MULLIN = 112
 6.1 Introduction = 112
 6.2 Introduction to microwaves and their interaction with food materials = 113
  6.2.1 Basics = 113
  6.2.2 How microwaves heat = 114
  6.2.3 Power absorption = 115
  6.2.4 Uniformity of heating = 115
  6.2.5 Material properties = 116
 6.3 Microwaves and microorganisms = 117
  6.3.1 Early work(1940-55) = 118
  6.3.2 Renewal of interest in the 1960s = 118
  6.3.3 Conclusion = 120
 6.4 Microwave Processing equipment = 120
  6.4.1 The benefits of microwave Processing = 120
  6.4.2 Current status of microwave processing in food industry applications = 121
  6.4.3 Microwave patents in preservation = 122
 6.5 Case histories = 123
  Case history 1 Green tea drying/roasting system with microwave and far infra-red techniques = 123
  Case history 2 Drying of pharmaceutleals = 125
  Case history 3 Pasteurisation of fruit and sugar mixture = 127
  Case history 4 Sterilisation after packaging of pasta products = 128
  Case history 5 Pilot plant microwave sterilizer = 129
 6.6 The future = 133
 References = 133
7 Hydrostatic pressure treatment of food : equipment and processing / B. MERTENS = 135
 7.1 Introduction = 135
 7.2 General description of an industrial high pressure system = 136
  7.2.1 The high pressure vessel and its closure = 136
  7.2.2 Pressure generation = 139
  7.2.3 Temperature control = 142
  7.2.4 Material handling = 143
 7.3 Current commercial applications of high pressure technology = 144
  7.3.1 Isostatic pressing = 144
  7.3.2 Quartz growing = 145
  7.3.3 Chemical reactors = 146
 7.4 Current status of high hydrostatic pressure technology with a view to food processing = 146
  7.4.1 Introduction = 146
  7.4.2 HHP food processing conditions : time, temperature and pressure = 147
  7.4.3 Capacity requirements = 147
  7.4.4 Fast cycling in combination with three shifts per day, 300 days per year operation = 149
  7.4.5 Process control = 150
  7.4.6 Safety = 150
 7.5 The challenges of the commercial application of high pressure technology in the food industry = 151
  7.5.1 Technical challenges = 151
  7.5.2 Economic and commercial challenges = 156
 7.6 Outlook = 157
 Acknowledgements = 158
 References = 158
8 Hydrostatic pressure treatment of food : microbiology / D. KNORR = 159
 8.1 History and key issues of high pressure application = 159
 8.2 Current applications = 160
 8.3 Pressure effects of microorganisms = 162
  8.3.1 Possible Mechanisms of action = 162
  8.3.2 Pressure inactivation of vegetative cells in food systems = 164
  8.3.3 Pressure effects on bacterial spores = 166
 8.4 Combination treatments = 167
 8.5 Conclusions = 172
 Acknowledgements = 172
 References = 172
9 Effect of heat and ultrasound on microorganisms and enzymes / F. J. SALA ; J. BURGOS ; S. COND$$\dot O$$N ; P. LOPEZ ; J. RASO = 176
 9.1 Historical perspective = 176
  9.1.1 Heat inactivation of microorganisms and enzymes = 177
  9.1.2 Destructive effect of ultrasound waves on microorganisms and enzymes = 182
 9.2 Destructive effect of combined treatments of heat and ultrasound under pressure : mano-Thermo-Sonication(MTS) = 190
  9.2.1 Effects of MTS on microorganisms = 192
  9.2.2 Effect of MTS on enzymes = 195
 9.3 Conclusions = 199
 References = 200
10 Electrical resistance heating of foods / P. FRYER = 205
 10.1 Introduction = 205
  10.1.1 The thermal sterilization of foods = 205
  10.1.2 Heat generation : electrical resistance heating = 207
  10.1.3 APV Baker ohmic heater = 209
  10.1.4 Preservation by electrical heating = 210
 10.2 The physics of electrical heating = 211
  10.2.1 Governing electrical equations = 211
  10.2.2 Thermal properties of foods = 215
  10.2.3 Food mixtures : flow and heat generation = 215
 10.3 Models for electrical heating = 216
  10.3.1 Electrical conductivity of foods = 216
  10.3.2 Electrical conductivity of solid-liquid mixtures = 217
  10.3.3 Flow and heat transfer = 219
  10.3.4 Holding and cooling systems = 224
 10.4 Electrically processed foods = 225
  10.4.1 Frequency effects in electrical processing = 225
  10.4.2 Enhanced diffusion in electrical processing = 226
  10.4.3 Differences between diffusion in conventional and electrically processed foods = 228
 10.5 Conclusions = 231
 Acknowledgements = 232
 References = 232
 Nomenclature = 234
11 High-voltage pulse techniques for food preservation / W. SITZMANN = 236
 11.1 Introduction = 236
 11.2 Cell count reduction by using electricity : a historical review = 237
 11.3 The Elsteril Process = 242
 11.4 The influence of high-voltage pulses on microorganisms = 244
 11.5 The influence of electric high-voltage pulses on food ingredients = 247
 11.6 Mathematical modeling of cell count reduction = 248
 11.7 Conclusions = 250
 References = 250
12 Preservation by microbial decontamination ; the surface treatment of meats by organic acids / F. J. M. SMULDERS = 253
 12.1 Introduction = 253
 12.2 Critical control points in carcass contamination = 254
  12.2.1 Material : the animal = 254
  12.2.2 Machine : equipment and utensils = 255
  12.2.3 Method : slaughter and fresh meat processing = 255
  12.2.4 Man the slaughter personnel = 256
 12.3 Organic acids as meat decontaminants = 257
  12.3.1 The antimicrobial properties of organic acids = 257
  12.3.2 Factors influencing the efficacy of meat decontamination by acids = 259
 12.4 Effects of acid treatment on sensory properties = 268
  12.4.1 Effects on colour = 268
  12.4.2 Effects on flavour and odour = 270
  12.4.3 Effects on drip loss = 271
 12.5 Mode of application of acids ; technologies available = 272
  12.5.1 Spraying and spray cabinets = 272
  12.5.2 Immersion = 274
  12.5.3 Other methods = 276
 12.6 Acceptability of acid treatment = 277
  12.6.1 Toxicological considerations = 277
  12.6.2 Legislation and refulations = 277
 12.7 Conclusions and actions needed = 277
 Acknowledgements = 278
 References = 278
13 Advances and potential for aseptic processing / D. ROSE = 283
 13.1 Aseptic technology = 283
 13.2 Regulatory effects = 284
 13.3 Aspects of food manufacturing practice = 285
  13.3.1 Scheduled processes = 285
 13.4 GMP guidelines = 289
 13.5 Design and development = 289
  13.5.1 Food contact surfaces = 291
  13.5.2 Food process = 291
  13.5.3 Non-food contact surfaces = 293
  13.5.4 Decontamination of packaging = 293
  13.5.5 Aseptic filling zone = 294
 13.6 Commissioning tests = 295
 13.7 Manufacturing directive = 296
 13.8 Economics and market trends = 296
  13.8.1 Bulk packaging = 298
  13.8.2 Commodity, added value or niche product? = 298
 13.9 Conclusions = 300
 References = 301
14 Advances in modified-atmosphere packaging / A. R. DAVIES = 304
 14.1 Introduction = 304
  14.1.1 Role of gases = 305
 14.2 Market status and potential = 306
 14.3 Microbiology of MAP = 308
  14.3.1 Microbial spoilage = 308
  14.3.2 Microbial safety = 310
  14.3.3 Clostridium botulinum = 310
  14.3.4 Other pathogens = 311
 14.4 Developments in MAP = 312
  14.4.1 Intelligent packaging = 312
  14.4.2 Predictive, mathematical modeling = 315
  14.4.3 Combination treatments = 316
  14.4.4 Packaging films/equipment = 316
  14.4.5 Indicators = 317
 14.5 The future 317
 Acknowledgement = 318
 References = 318
Index = 321


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