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Non-verbal predication : theory, typology, diachrony

Non-verbal predication : theory, typology, diachrony (Loan 1 times)

Material type
단행본
Personal Author
Hengeveld, Kees, 1957-
Title Statement
Non-verbal predication : theory, typology, diachrony.
Publication, Distribution, etc
Berlin ;   New York :   Mouton de Gruyter,   1992.  
Physical Medium
xxiii, 321 p. ; 24 cm.
Series Statement
Funtional grammar series ;15.
ISBN
3110137135(acid-free paper) :
General Note
Includes bibliography (p. [293]-305) and indexes.  
Subject Added Entry-Topical Term
Grammar, Comparative and general --Verb phrase. Functionalism (Linguistics).
000 00730camuuu200217 a 4500
001 000000910280
005 19990107155947.0
008 950609s1992 gw 000 0 eng d
020 ▼a 3110137135(acid-free paper) : ▼c DM138.00
040 ▼a 244002 ▼c 244002
049 0 ▼l 452094367
082 0 4 ▼a 415
090 ▼a 415 ▼b H511n
100 1 ▼a Hengeveld, Kees, ▼d 1957-
245 1 0 ▼a Non-verbal predication : ▼b theory, typology, diachrony.
260 ▼a Berlin ; ▼a New York : ▼b Mouton de Gruyter, ▼c 1992.
300 ▼a xxiii, 321 p. ; ▼c 24 cm.
440 0 ▼a Funtional grammar series ; ▼v 15.
500 ▼a Includes bibliography (p. [293]-305) and indexes.
650 0 ▼a Grammar, Comparative and general ▼x Verb phrase.
650 0 ▼a Functionalism (Linguistics).

Holdings Information

No. Location Call Number Accession No. Availability Due Date Make a Reservation Service
No. 1 Location Sejong Academic Information Center/Humanities 1/ Call Number 415 H511n Accession No. 452094367 Availability Available Due Date Make a Reservation Service C M

Contents information

Table of Contents


CONTENTS
List of maps, tables, and figures = xvii
Abbreviations = xxi
0. Introduction = 1
1. Some basic principles of Functional Grammar = 3
 1.0. Introduction = 3
 1.1. Predicate frames = 3
 1.2. Term formation = 4
 1.3. The representation of states of affairs = 4
 1.4. Syntactic and pragmatic functions = 5
 1.5. The representation of utterances = 6
 1.6. Terms and entities = 8
 1.7. Operators = 8
 1.8. Satellites = 10
 1.9. Clause structure = 11
 1.10. Subordination = 12
 1.11. Expression rules = 13
2. The sample = 15
 2.0. Introduction = 15
 2.1. Sampling method = 15
 2.2. Description of the sample = 18
 2.3. Matters of presentation = 23
3. Non-verbal predication = 25
 3.0. Introduction = 25
 3.1. Predication = 25
 3.2. Non-verbal predication = 26
 3.3. Non-verbal predicates = 27
 3.4. Copula, semi-copula, pseudo-copula = 30
  3.4.0. Introduction = 30
  3.4.1. The copula = 32
  3.4.2. The semi-copula = 34
  3.4.3. The pseudo-copula = 39
   3.4.3.0. Introduction = 39
   3.4.3.1. Reduced complements = 39
   3.4.3.2. Predicative adjuncts = 40
   3.4.3.3. Predicative arguments = 42
   3.4.3.4. Quotative arguments = 43
 3.5. Summary = 45
4. Parts of speech = 47
 4.0. Introduction = 47
 4.1. Previous approaches = 48
 4.2. Variables for predicates = 51
 4.3. New definitions = 55
 4.4. The identification of classes of predicates = 60
 4.5. Parts-of-speech systems = 62
  4.5.0. Introduction  = 62
  4.5.1. Flexible versus rigid languages = 63
  4.5.2. The parts-of-speech hierarchy = 68
  4.5.3. Explaining the parts-of-speech hierarchy = 71
 4.6. Preview = 72
5. A classification of non-verbal predications = 73
 5.0. Introduction = 73
 5.1. Predicate types = 74
  5.1.0. Introduction = 74
  5.1.1. Bare predicates = 75
  5.1.2. Referential predicates = 77
   5.1.2.0. Introduction = 77
   5.1.2.1. Term predicates = 77
    5.1.2.1.1. General properties = 77
    5.1.2.1.2. Definiteness and indefiniteness = 80
    5.1.2.1.3. Specification and characterization = 82
   5.1.2.2. Other referential predicates = 89
  5.1.3. Relational predicates = 91
   5.1.3.1. General properties = 91
   5.1.3.2. Localizing predicates = 94
    5.1.3.2.0. Introduction = 94
    5.1.3.2.1. Locative predicates = 94
    5.1.3.2.2. Existential predicates = 96
   5.1.3.4. Possessive predicates = 100
   5.1.3.5. Summary = 101
  5.1.4. Major non-verbal predication types = 101
   5.1.4.1. Equative, ascriptive, and existential predication = 101
   5.1.4.2. The identification of major non-verbal predication types = 104
  5.1.5. Summary = 105
 5.2. Argument types = 106
  5.2.0. Introduction = 106
  5.2.1. Entities = 108
  5.2.2. Arguments = 109
  5.2.3. Arguments of non-verbal predicates = 111
 5.3. Predicability = 112
  5.3.0. Introduction = 112
  5.3.1. Ontological predicability = 112
  5.3.2. Linguistic predicability = 113
 5.4. Semantic relations in non-verbal predication = 115
 5.5. Presentativity = 118
  5.5.1. Presentative and non-presentative arguments = 118
  5.5.2. Major non-verbal predication types---continued = 121
 5.6. Control = 122
 5.7. Summary = 123
 5.8. Key examples = 125
6, Non-verbal predicability = 127
 6.0. Introduction = 127
 6.1. Predicability and predicate type = 130
  6.1.0. Introduction = 130
  6.1.1. Ascriptive predications = 130
   6.1.1.1. Non -presentative predications = 130
   6.1.1.2. Explanations = 135
   6.1.1.3. Presentative predications = 139
  6.1.2. Equative predications = 141
 6.2. Predicability and predication type = 145
  6.2.0. Introduction = 145
  6.2.1. Ascriptive predications = 145
  6.2.2. Ascriptive and equative predications = 150
 6.3. Predicability and deixis = 152
 6.4. Predicability and quantification = 153
 6.5. Summary = 154
7. Alternatives for non-verbal predications = 157
 7.0. Introduction = 157
 7.1. Alternative predication types = 157
  7.1.1. The lexical predication type = 157
   7.1.1.1. The true lexical predication type = 157
   7.1.1.2. The pseudo-transitive predication type = 159
  7.1.2. The equative predication type = 160
  7.1.3. The locative predication type = 162
  7.1.4. The existential predication type = 163
   7.1.4.0. Introduction = 163
   7.1.4.1. Possessor as experiencer = 163
   7.1.4.2. Possessor as restrictor = 164
   7.1.4.3. Possessor as theme = 164
  7.1.5. The proprietive/privative predication type = 165
   7.1.5.0. Introduction = 165
   7.1.5.1. Adjectival/nominal = 165
   7.1.5.2. Adverbial = 166
  7.1.6. The predicative quantifier predication type = 167
 7.2. The distribution of alternative predication types = 169
  7.2.0. Introduction = 169
  7.2.1. Alternatives for non-presentative predications = 170
  7.2.2. Alternatives for presentative predications = 174
 7.3. Summary = 182
8. The expression of non-verbal predications = 185
 8.0. Introduction = 185
 8.1. Expression formats = 185
  8.1.0. Introduction = 185
  8.1.1. Expression formats lacking a copula = 185
  8.1.2. Copulas = 188
   8.1.2.0. Introduction = 188
   8.1.2.1. Predicativizing copulas = 188
   8.1.2.2. Discriminating copulas = 190
  8.1.3. A classification of expression formats = 192
 8.2. The distribution of expression formats = 194
  8.2.0. Introduction = 194
  8.2.1. Expression formats across languages = 194
  8.2.2. Expression formats across predication types = 198
   8.2.2.0. Introduction = 198
   8.2.2.1. The zero-1 strategy = 199
   8.2.2.2. The zero-2 strategy = 201
   8.2.2.3. The discriminating strategy = 204
 8.3. Copula triggers = 205
  8.3.0. Introduction = 205
  8.3.1. Tense, mood, aspect, and person = 205
   8.3.1.0. Introduction = 205
   8.3.1.1. Conditions = 206
   8.3.1.2. Optional and obligatory absence = 207
  8.3.2. Deixis = 208
  8.3.3. Tense and deixis = 210
  8.3.4. Ambiguity = 211
9. Systems of non-verbal predication = 213
 9.0. Introduction = 213
 9.1. Expression patterns = 213
  9.1.0. Introduction = 213
  9.1.1. Relational versus non-relational = 216
  9.1.2. Equative versus localizing = 219
  9.1.3. Presentative versus non-presentative = 221
  9.1.4. All alike = 224
  9.1.5. Localizing versus non-localizing = 225
  9.1.6. Equative versus non-equative = 227
  9.1.7. Identifying versus non-identifying = 229
 9.2. Discussion = 230
  9.2.0. Introduction = 230
  9.2.1. Rigid languages = 231
  9.2.2. Flexible languages = 233
  9.2.3. Specialized languages = 233
 9.3. The status of adjectives = 234
 9.4. Summary = 236
10. Copularization = 237
 10.0. Introduction = 237
 10.1. Positional verbs and localizing copulas = 238
  10.1.0. Introduction = 238
  10.1.1. Positional verbs = 238
  10.1.2. Localizing copulas = 240
  10.1.3. Synthesis = 243
   10.1.3.0. Introduction = 243
   10.1.3.1. Specialized languages = 243
   10.1.3.2. Rigid languages = 248
   10.1.3.3. Summary = 249
 10.2. Pronouns = 249
 10.3. Semi-copulas = 253
 10.4. Existential verbs = 254
 10.5. Summary = 256
11. Auxiliarization = 257
 11.0. Introduction = 257
 11.1. Auxiliary predication types = 258
  11.1.1.Property assignment = 258
   11.1.1.0. Introduction = 258
   11.1.1.1. Aspect = 258
   11.1.1.2. Mood = 263
  11.1.2. Classification = 265
   11.1.2.0. Introduction = 265
   11.1.2.1. Aspect = 265
   11.1.2.2. Mood = 268
  11.1.3. Localization = 268
   11.1.3.0. Introduction = 268
   11.1.3.1. Aspect = 268
   11.1.3.2. Mood = 271
   11.1.3.3. Negation = 273
  11.1.4. Metaphorical extension of the locative predication type = 274
  11.1.5. Reality = 276
   11.1.5.0. Introduction = 276
   11.1.5.1. Mood = 277
   11.1.5.2. Negation = 278
  11.1.6. Instantiation and factuality = 279
  11.1.7. Discussion = 283
 11.2. Basic and auxiliary predication = 286
  11.2.0. Introduction = 286
  11.2.1. Property assignment, classification, localization = 288
  11.2.2. Instantiation and reality = 289
  11.2.3. Metaphorical extension of the locative predication type = 289
 11.3. Summary = 290
12. Conclusion = 291
References = 293
Index of languages = 307
Index of names = 311
Index of subjects = 315


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