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The handbook of the law of visiting forces

The handbook of the law of visiting forces (Loan 6 times)

Material type
단행본
Personal Author
Fleck, Dieter. Addy, Stuart.
Title Statement
The handbook of the law of visiting forces / edited by Dieter Fleck ; in collaboration with Stuart Addy ... [et al.].
Publication, Distribution, etc
Oxford ;   New York :   Oxford University Press,   2001.  
Physical Medium
xxxv, 625 p. ; 24 cm.
ISBN
0198268947
Bibliography, Etc. Note
Includes bibliographical references and index.
Subject Added Entry-Topical Term
Status of forces agreements.
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008 010207s2001 enk b 001 0 eng
010 ▼a 1021218
020 ▼a 0198268947
040 ▼a DLC ▼c DLC ▼d UKM ▼d C#P ▼d 211009
042 ▼a pcc
049 ▼a OCLC ▼l 111289487
050 0 0 ▼a KZ5589 ▼b .H36 2001
082 0 0 ▼a 341.7/2 ▼2 21
090 ▼a 341.72 ▼b H236
245 0 4 ▼a The handbook of the law of visiting forces / ▼c edited by Dieter Fleck ; in collaboration with Stuart Addy ... [et al.].
260 ▼a Oxford ; ▼a New York : ▼b Oxford University Press, ▼c 2001.
300 ▼a xxxv, 625 p. ; ▼c 24 cm.
504 ▼a Includes bibliographical references and index.
650 0 ▼a Status of forces agreements.
700 1 ▼a Fleck, Dieter.
700 1 ▼a Addy, Stuart.

Holdings Information

No. Location Call Number Accession No. Availability Due Date Make a Reservation Service
No. 1 Location Main Library/Law Library(Preservation Stacks/B2)/ Call Number 341.72 H236 Accession No. 111289487 Availability Available Due Date Make a Reservation Service B M

Contents information

Table of Contents


CONTENTS

Preface by Lord Robertson of Port Ellen, Secretary General of NATO = ⅴ

List of Contributors = xxi

Abbreviations = xxiii

List of Treaties, international Instruments = xxvii

PARTⅠ GENERAL FRAMEWORK

 Ⅰ Introduction / Dieter Fleck = 3

  Ⅰ. The Immunity of Foreign Armed Forces = 3

  Ⅱ. Evolving Customary Law? = 6

  Ⅲ. The Relationship Between International Law and National Law of the Receiving State = 7

  Ⅳ. The Design of the Handbook = 8

 Ⅱ Historical Developments Influencing the Present Law of Visiting Forces / Peter Rowe = 11

  Ⅰ. Introduction = 11

  Ⅱ. The Law of Visiting Forces Prior to World War Ⅱ = 12

  Ⅲ. Visiting Forces During World War Ⅱ = 15

  Ⅳ. Key Issues of the Negotiations and of Parliamentary Debates on NATO SOFA = 18

  Ⅴ. The Warsaw Pact Arrangements = 26

  Ⅵ. Challenges Posed by New Types of Military Operations = 27

  Ⅶ. Conclusion = 31

 Ⅲ Multinational Units / Dieter Fleck = 33

  Ⅰ. Present Agreements on Multinational Units = 33

  Ⅱ. The Status of Personnel = 36

  Ⅲ. Command and Control = 39

  Ⅳ. Conclusions = 43

PARTⅡ COMMENTARIES TO CURRENT SOFA RULES

 Ⅳ Present and Future Challenges for the Status of Forces(ius in praesentia). A Commentary to Applicable Status Law Provisions = 47

  Ⅰ. General Observations / Dieter Fleck = 47

 Ⅳ/1 Members of Visiting Forces, Civilian Components, Dependents / William Thomas Anderson ; Frank Burkhardt = 51

  Ⅰ. Introduction = 51

  Ⅱ. Members of Visiting Forces under the NATO SOFA = 51

   1. Active Duty = 51

   2. Reservists = 52

   3. Former Members of Visiting Forces = 52

   4. Paramilitary Organizations = 53

   5. Nationality = 53

   6. Presence in the Territory of Another Contracting Party in the North Atlantic Treaty Area in Connection with Official Duties = 54

  Ⅲ. Civilian Components under the NATO SOFA = 55

  Ⅳ. Dependents under the NATO SOFA = 57

   1. General = 57

   2. Spouse by Marriage = 57

   3. Other Arrangements = 58

   4. Children = 58

   5. Other Relatives = 59

  Ⅴ. Out of Area Deployments = 59

 Ⅳ/2 Respect for the Law of the Receiving State / Rodney Batstone = 61

  Ⅰ. Introduction = 61

  Ⅱ. Application of Receiving State Law = 62

   1. Private Law = 63

   2. Administrative and Public Law = 64

   3. Application of Receiving State Administrative and Approval Procedures = 65

  Ⅲ. Mode of Application of Receiving State Law = 66

  Ⅳ. Areas of Non-Application of Receiving State Law = 68

  Ⅴ. The Function of the Obligation to Respect the Law of the Receiving State = 69

 Ⅳ/3 Entry and Departure of Foreign Military Personnel / Frank Burkhardt = 71

 Ⅳ/4 Vehicles / Paul J. Conderman = 75

  Ⅰ. Driving Licences = 75

  Ⅱ. Vehicle Registration = 78

   1. Registration of Service Vehicles = 78

   2. Registration of Privately-Owned Vehicles = 80

  Ⅲ. Insurance = 83

 Ⅳ/5 Uniform / A. P. V. Rogers = 85

 Ⅳ/6 Arms / Eckhard Heth = 87

  Ⅰ. Force Security = 88

   1. Police Powers Inside Military Establishments = 88

    (a) Preventive Action = 90

    (b) Repressive Action = 90

    (C) Jointly Used Premises = 90

   2. Police Powers Outside Premises = 91

   3. Definition of Responsibilities = 92

  Ⅱ. Arms Import Control = 92

  Ⅲ. Use of Force = 93

   1. General Right to Self-Defence = 93

   2. Use of Firearms = 94

  Ⅳ. Conclusion = 97

 Ⅳ/7. Jurisdiction / Paid J. Conderman = 99

  Ⅰ. Introduction = 99

   1. The Law of the Flag is Hoisted and Lowered = 99

   2. Types of Agreements Affecting Status of Forces = 102

  Ⅱ. Criminal Jurisdiction = 103

   1. Personnel Covered by Status of Forces Agreements = 103

    (a) Members of a Force = 104

    (b) Members of a Civilian Component = 105

    (c) Dependents = 107

    (d) Contractor Employees = 107

   2. The Jurisdictional Decision = 108

    (a) Exclusive Jurisdiction = 109

    (b) Concurrent Jurisdiction = 110

     (ⅰ) Waiver of Host Nation Primary Right to Exercise Jurisdiction = 112

      (aa) Recall of Waiver = 114

      (bb) Double Jeopardy-ne bis in idem = 115

     (ⅱ) Waiver of Sending State Primary Jurisdiction = 117

   3. Arrest, Custody and Related Issues = 117

    (a) Legal Hold over Military Personnel = 119

    (b) Legal Hold as it Pertains to Members of the Civilian Component and Dependents = 119

    (c) 'Extradition' and Return of Military Personnel = 120

    (d) Surrender = 121

    (e) Rights of Accused = 122

     (ⅰ) Interrogation = 122

     (ⅱ) The Right to Counsel and when it Attaches = 123

     (ⅲ) Appeals = 124

     (ⅳ) Execution of Sentences = 124

     (ⅴ) A Sovereignty Sore Spot : The Death Penalty = 125

  Ⅲ. Civil Jurisdiction = 131

  Ⅳ. Administrative Jurisdiction = 133

   1. Environmental Provisions = 134

   2. Real Estate = 135

   3. Health and Safety = 138

   4. Traffic = 140

   5. Employment = 144

   6. Taxes and Customs = 150

   7. Communications = 153

  Ⅴ. Conclusion = 156

 Ⅳ/8 Claims / Jody M. Prescott = 159

  Ⅰ. Introduction = 159

  Ⅱ. Historical Background = 160

   1. Prior to 1914 = 160

   2. World War Ⅰ = 160

   3. World War Ⅱ = 161

   4. Post World War Ⅱ = 162

  Ⅲ. The NATO SOFA Claims Regime = 163

   1. Article Ⅷ = 163

    (a) Intergovernmental Claims = 163

    (b) Official Duty Third-Party Claims = 164

    (c) Ex Gratia Claims = 164

   2. NATO Headquarters Claims = 165

   3. US Claims Operations in Germany = 166

    (a) Legal and Executive Authorities = 166

    (b) Claims Processing : Official Duty Claims = 167

    (c) Claims Processing : Ex Gratia(Non-Official Duty) Claims = 168

  Ⅳ. Claims Operations in the Former Yugoslavia = 170

   1. UN Claims Operations = 170

    (a) Article 51, Model SOFA = 170

    (b) Claims Review Boards in the Former Yugoslavia = 171

    (c) UN Claims Reform Efforts = 172

   2. IFOR/SFOR Claims Operations : The Legal Bases for Claims Activities in Bosnia-Herzegovina and Croatia = 173

    (a) The Dayton SOFAs and the Balanzino Letter = 174

    (b) The Technical Arrangements = 174

    (c) The Claims Appendices = 175

    (d) The Bosnian Protocols and the Zagreb IFOR Claims Procedures = 176

   3. IFOR/SFOR Claims Operations : The Claims Offices and Activities = 177

   4. IFOR/SFOR Claims Issues = 178

    (a) The Efficacy and Competence of the Claims Commissions and Arbitration Tribunals = 178

    (b) Damages to Transportation Infrastructure = 179

    (c) Applicable Receiving State Law with regard to Liability and the Amount of Awards = 179

   5. US Claims Operations in Bosnia-Herzegovina and Croatia = 180

  Ⅴ. Claims Operations in Hungary = 182

   1. Soviet Era Claims Operations = 182

   2. US Claims Operations = 183

  Ⅵ. Conclusion = 186

 Ⅳ/9 Logistic Support / Stuart Addy = 187

  Ⅰ. Introduction = 187

   1. Historical Overview = 188

   2. Modern Challenges = 190

   3. Considered Solutions = 193

  Ⅱ. The Desire to Reduce Costs = 193

   1. NATO's Experience = 193

   2. UN Practice = 196

   3. Proposed Changes = 197

   4. Legal Concerns = 199

  Ⅲ. Issues Relating to Personnel and Contractor Staff = 201

   1. Sea Transport = 202

   2. Land Operations = 203

   3. Legal Considerations = 204

  Ⅳ. Environmental Pressures = 205

  Ⅴ. Mutual Support = 211

  Ⅵ. Withdrawal from the Theatre = 215

  Ⅶ. Conclusions = 217

 Ⅳ/10 Tax Exemptions / Mark D. Welton = 219

  Ⅰ. Introduction = 219

  Ⅱ. The NATO SOFA = 221

  Ⅲ. Supplementary and Other Agreements = 222

  Ⅳ. Problems of Interpretation and Application = 225

 Ⅳ/11 Customs Exemptions / Mark D. Welton = 231

  Ⅰ. Introduction = 231

  Ⅱ. NATO SOFA Exemptions = 231

  Ⅲ. Supplementary Agreements = 233

  Ⅳ. Problems of Customs Exemptions = 234

 Ⅳ/12 Settlement of Disputes / Baldwin de Vidts = 237

  Ⅰ. Drafting History of Article XVI NATO SOFA = 237

  Ⅱ. Practical Application = 237

  Ⅲ. Scope of the Provision = 238

  Ⅳ. Influence of Article XVI NATO SOFA on the jurisdiction of th ICJ = 238

 Ⅳ/13 Territorial Applicability / Baldwin de Vidts = 241

  Ⅰ. Drafting History of Article XX NATO SOFA = 241

  Ⅱ. Applicability with Respect to Specific Areas = 241

   1. Azores = 241

   2. Gander, Newfoundland = 241

   3. Hawaii and the Aleutian islands = 242

   4. Greenland = 244

   5. The Canary and Balearic Islands = 244

   6. Gibraltar = 245

   7. New Members' Territory = 245

   8. New Laender of Germany = 245

   9. Former Colonies and Dominions = 248

  Ⅲ. Applicability Out Of Area? = 249

   1. Naval Operations = 249

   2. Aerial Operations = 251

   3. Land Operations = 252

  Ⅳ. Conclusion = 253

 Ⅳ/14 Applicability during Crisis or War / Dieter Fleck = 255

 Ⅴ International Military Headquarters = 257

 Ⅴ/1 NATO Military Headquarters / Max S. Johnson = 257

  Ⅰ. Introduction = 257

  Ⅱ. Preliminary Remarks and Background = 258

  Ⅲ. Paris Protocol Provisions : Comments and Practical Applications = 262

  Ⅳ. Conclusion = 319

 Ⅴ/2 Other International Military Headquarters = 321

  Ⅰ. United Nations / Michael Bothe ; Thomas D$$\ddot o$$rschel = 321

  Ⅱ. Regional Treaty Organizations = 322

   1. European Union / Dieter Fleck ; Max S. Johnson = 322

    (a) Historic Development = 322

    (b) Present Activities = 324

   2. Commonwealth of Independent States / Bakhtiyar Tuzmukhamedar = 325

  Ⅲ. Headquarters IFOR/SFOR / James A. Burger = 328

   1. introduction = 328

   2. Formation of HQ IFOR = 330

   3. Planning and Operations = 334

   4. Handling National Differences = 335

   5. Lessons Learned = 337

  Ⅳ. Headquarters KFOR / Max S. Johnson = 339

PARTⅢ CASE STUDIES

 Ⅵ The Development of the Law of Stationing Forces in Germany : Five Decades of Multilateral Cooperation / Dieter Fleck = 349

  Ⅰ. Occupation after World War Ⅱ = 350

  Ⅱ. Two German States = 351

   1. The Federal Republic of Germany = 351

    (a) Ius ad Praesentiam = 351

    (b) Ius in Praesentia = 353

    (c) International Military Headquarters in the Federal Republic of Germany = 354

    (d) NATO Agencies in the Federal Republic of Germany = 354

   2. The German Democratic Republic = 355

  Ⅲ. The German Unification in 1990 = 355

   1. The Treaty on German Unity = 355

   2. The Withdrawal of Russian Forces = 357

   3. The Revision of the Supplementary Agreement to NATO SOFA = 358

   4. German Participation in Multinational Units = 359

   5. The 1995 Visiting Forces Act = 360

   6. Partnership for Peace and Further Developments = 362

  Ⅳ. Conclusion = 363

 Ⅶ United States Forces in Japan : A Bilateral Experience / Hiroshi Honma ; Dale Sonnenberg ; Donald A. Timm = 365

  Ⅰ. Introduction / Hiroshi Honma ; Dale Sonnenberg ; Donald A. Timm = 365

  Ⅱ. The Development of the Law of Stationing US Forces in Japan / Hiroshima Honma = 369

   1. Occupation = 369

   2. The 1946 Constitution of Japan = 370

   3. The 1951 Security Treaty and the 1952 Administrative Agreement = 371

   4. Military Control of Separated Okinawa = 373

   5. The 1960 Security Treaty and the Agreement Regarding the Status of US Forces in Japan = 374

   6. Return to Japan of the Power to Control over Okinawa = 376

   7. The 1997 Guidelines for Japan-US Defense Cooperation = 377

   8. Other Recent Developments and Trends = 378

  Ⅲ. The Agreements Regarding Status of Foreign Forces in Japan / Dale Sonnenberg ; Donald A. Timm = 379

   1. The United States Forces Japan = 379

   2. The United Nations Command(UNC) = 389

   3. Review of Key Provisions = 392

    (a) Symmetry = 392

    (b) Definitions = 392

    (c) Facilities and Areas = 396

    (d) Operations = 397

    (e) Responsibility Sharing = 399

    (d) Local Procurement = 400

    (g) Taxes = 401

    (h) Local Labour = 401

    (i) Foreign Criminal Jurisdiction = 402

  Ⅳ. The Legal Structure in Japan as Related to the Law of Stationing US Forces / Hiroshi Honma = 403

   1. Divergent Opinions on the Meaning of the Renunciation of War Powers Prescribed in the Constitution = 403

   2. Different Court Judgments on the Legality of Stationing US Forces in Japan = 404

   3. The Obligation of US Personnel to Respect the Laws ol Japan = 405

   4. Certain Gaps between US Requirements and the Laws of Japan Regarding the Use of Bases = 407

    (a) The Extended Power of the US Forces to Use their Bases and its Influence on Japan = 407

    (b) Limitations on the Power of the US Forces to Use heir Bases = 409

   5. Specific Features = 411

    (a) Lack of Symmetry in the Security System = 411

    (b) Effect of Prior Consultations = 412

    (c) Geographic Limitations in the Security Treaty = 412

    (d) The Application of the Agreement Regarding the status of the US Forces in Situations of Tension = 413

    (e) Defacto Amendment of Criminal Proceedings = 414

    (f) Settlement of Costs = 415

  Ⅴ. Conclusions / Hiroshi Honma ; Dale Sonnenberg ; Donald A. Timm = 416

 Ⅷ Russian Forces in the Commonwealth of Independent States / Bakhtiyar Tuzmukhamedov = 417

  Ⅰ. National Security Powers under the Russian Constitution of 1993 = 418

  Ⅱ. Russia and the CIS : Official Declarations = 428

  Ⅲ. Russian Forces in the CIS : Multilateral and Bilateral Arrangements = 430

  Ⅳ. Peacekeeping in the CIS = 436

  Ⅴ. Conclusions = 440

 Ⅸ Visiting Forces in Korea / Donald A. Timm = 443

  Ⅰ. Introduction = 443

  Ⅱ. The Three Commands = 444

   1. The United Nations Command(UNC) = 444

   2. The Republic of Korea-United States Combined Forces Command(CFC) = 446

   3. The United States Forces Korea(USFK) = 447

  Ⅲ. The Agreements Governing Visiting Forces in the Republic of Korea = 448

   1. The United States-Republic of Korea SOFA = 448

    (a) Symmetry = 450

    (b) Definitions = 450

    (c) Facilities and Areas = 452

    (d) Local Procurement = 455

    (e) Taxes = 456

    (f) Local Labour = 456

    (g) Criminal Jurisdiction = 457

   2. The 'Meyer Agreement' for UN Forces in the Republic of Korea = 464

  Ⅳ. Multinational Units in the Republic of Korea : The KATUSA Program = 467

  Ⅴ. Conclusions = 469

 Ⅹ The International Committee of the Red Cross : Legal Status and Headquarters Agreements / Jean Philippe Lavoyer = 471

  Ⅰ. Introduction = 471

  Ⅱ. The Birth of the ICRC and of Humanitarian Law = 471

  Ⅲ. The Mandate of the ICRC = 472

   1. The Geneva Conventions of 1949 = 473

    (a) International Armed Conflicts = 473

    (b) Internal Armed Conflicts = 473

   2. The Additional Protocols of 1977 = 473

   3. The Statutes of the International Red Cross and Red Crescent Movement = 473

   4. The ICRC as 'Guardian' or 'Custodian' of International Humanitarian Law = 474

  Ⅳ. The Legal Status of the ICRC = 475

  Ⅴ. The ICRC's Headquarters Agreements = 477

   1. Operational Delegations = 477

   2. Regional Delegations = 477

   3. The Legal Nature of Headquarters Agreements = 478

   4. The Negotiation of Headquarters Agreements = 478

   5. The Headquarters Agreement with Switzerland = 479

  Ⅵ The Contents of the Headquarters Agreements = 479

   (ⅰ) The Preamble = 480

   (ⅱ) The Legal status of the ICRC = 480

   (ⅲ) Juridical Personality = 480

   (ⅳ) Immunity of the ICRC = 480

   (ⅴ) Inviolability of ICRC Premises, Property and Assets = 480

   (ⅵ) Inviolability of ICRC Archives = 480

   (ⅶ) Communications = 480

   (ⅷ) Financial Resources of the ICRC = 481

   (ⅸ) Exemption from Taxes = 481

   (ⅹ) Exemption from Customs Duties = 481

   (xi) Status of Members of the Delegation = 481

   (xii) Identity Document and Commission = 482

   (xiii) Cooperation with the Host Country = 482

   (xiv) Interpretation = 483

   (xv) Settlement of Disputes by Negotiation = 483

   (xvi) Arbitration = 483

   (xvii) Amendments to the Agreement = 483

   (xviii) Subsidiary Agreements = 483

   (xix) Entry into Force of the Agreement = 483

   (xx) Denunciation = 483

  Ⅶ. International Cooperation Agreements = 483

  Ⅷ. Legal Status of Other Organizations = 484

   1. Non-Governmental Organizations = 484

   2. National Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies and their International Federation = 486

  Ⅸ. Conclusion = 486

 XI The UN Peacekeeping Experience / Michael Bothe ; Thomas D$$\ddot o$$rschel = 487

  Ⅰ. Introduction = 487

  Ⅱ. Historical Development of Peacekeeping = 488

  Ⅲ.Various Forms of Peacekeeping in the System of Collective Security = 489

  Ⅳ. Rules of International Law Relating to the Status of Peacekeeping Forces = 490

   1. The Subjects of Rights and Duties under International Law = 490

   2. Mission-specific Arrangements = 491

    (a) The Relationship Between the United Nations and the Host State = 491

     (ⅰ) Mandate of the Operation = 491

     (ⅱ) Consent of the Host State = 491

     (ⅲ) Status of Forces Agreement = 492

     (ⅳ) Further Agreements Between the United Nations and the Host State = 494

    (b) Internal Rules of the United Nations = 494

   3. Legal Sources of a General Nature = 496

    (a) Article 105, paragraph 2 of the United Nations Charter = 496

    (b) The Convention of the Privileges and Immunities of the United Nations = 496

    (c) Convention on the Safety of the United Nations and Associated Personnel = 497

    (d) International Law Relating to the Conduct of Hostilities = 499

   4. Conclusion = 502

  Ⅴ. The Status of Peacekeeping Forces = 502

 XII Lessons Learned in the Former Republic of Yugoslavia / James A. Burger = 507

  Ⅰ. Introduction = 507

  Ⅱ. The Mandate = 508

  Ⅲ. The Dayton Accords = 508

  Ⅳ. The SOFAs = 510

  Ⅴ. The Rules of Engagement(ROE) = 512

  Ⅵ. Particular Issues under the SOFAs = 513

   1. Property Agreements = 513

   2. Criminal and Civil Jurisdiction = 516

   3. Labour Agreements = 517

   4. Taxes and Customs = 519

   5. Claims = 520

   6. Airports and Ports = 521

  Ⅶ. Particular Issues under the ROE = 521

  Ⅷ. War Crimes = 523

  Ⅸ. The Legal Advisers = 525

  Ⅹ. The KFOR Experience = 526

  XI. Summary of Lessons Learned = 528

PARTⅣ CONCLUSIONS FOR THE CONDUCT OF MILITARY OPERATIONS

 XIII Visiting Forces in an Operational Context / A. P. V Rogers = 533

  Ⅰ. Introduction = 533

  Ⅱ. The Legal Background = 534

   1. Deployment of Small Military Missions under UN Auspices = 534

   2. Deployment of NATO Forces Within the NATO Area = 536

   3. Deployment of NATO Forces Outside the NATO Area = 537

   4. Deployment of Forces in States Associated with NATO = 539

   5. Deployment of Forces Within the Area of Another Regional Organization = 539

   6. Deployment of Forces Outside the Area of Regional Organizations = 540

   7. Deployment of UN Peace Support Operations = 541

   8. Deployment without the Consent of the Receiving State = 542

   9. Deployment on Peace Support Operations where a State has Collapsed = 543

   10. Legal Advice = 543

  Ⅲ. Some Possibly Contentious Issues = 544

   1. Command and Control ; Powers of Command = 544

   2. Respect for Local Law = 546

   3. Freedom of Movement = 546

   4. Use of Force by Members of the Sending State Forces = 546

   5. Criminal Jurisdiction over Personnel of the Sending State = 550

   6. Policing = 552

   7. Claims = 552

   8. Status of Contractor Personnel and Representatives of Non-Governmental Organizations = 553

   9. Difficulties of Interpretation and Application = 553

   10. Matters of Detail = 554

  Ⅳ. Practical Guidelines : Check List for Lawyers Involved in Pre-deployment Negotiations = 554

ANNEXES

 A Agreement Between the Parties to the North Atlantic Treaty Regarding the Status of Their Forces(NATO SOFA) = 561

 B Agreement Among the States Parties to the North Atlantic Treaty and the Other States Participating in the Partnership for Peace Regarding the Status of their Forces(PfP SOFA) = 577

 C Agreement on the Status of Missions and Representatives of Third States to the North Atlantic Treaty Organization(Brussels Agreement) = 583

 D Agreement between the Republic of Bosnia and Herzegovina and the North Atlantic Treaty Organization Concerning the Status of NATO and its Personnel(Dayton SOFAs) = 585

 E Military Technical Agreement between the International Security Force('KFOR') and the Governments of the Federal Republic of Yugoslavia and the Republic of Serbia ; UNMIK/KFOR Joint Declaration ; UNMIK Regulation 2000/47 On the Status, Privileges and Immunities of KFOR and UNMIK and their Personnel in Kosovo(KFOR Arrangements) = 591

 F Model Status-of-Forces Agreement for Peacekeeping Operations(UN Model SOFA) = 603

 G Model Agreement between the United Nations and Member States Contributing Personnel and Equipment to United Nations Peace-Keeping Operations(UN Model Contribution Agreement) = 615

Index = 621



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