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Historical linguistics and language change

Historical linguistics and language change (Loan 4 times)

Material type
단행본
Personal Author
Lass, Roger.
Title Statement
Historical linguistics and language change / Roger Lass.
Publication, Distribution, etc
Cambridge ;   New York :   Cambridge University Press,   1997.  
Physical Medium
xxiii, 423 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
Series Statement
Cambridge studies in linguistics ; 81
ISBN
0521453089 (hardback) 0521459249 (pbk.)
Bibliography, Etc. Note
Includes bibliographical references (p. 391-415) and indexes.
Subject Added Entry-Topical Term
Historical linguistics.
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020 ▼a 0521453089 (hardback)
020 ▼a 0521459249 (pbk.)
040 ▼a DLC ▼c DLC ▼d C#P ▼d UKM ▼d 211009
049 1 ▼l 111236416
050 0 0 ▼a P140 ▼b .L28 1997
082 0 0 ▼a 417/.7 ▼2 20
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100 1 ▼a Lass, Roger.
245 1 0 ▼a Historical linguistics and language change / ▼c Roger Lass.
260 ▼a Cambridge ; ▼a New York : ▼b Cambridge University Press, ▼c 1997.
300 ▼a xxiii, 423 p. : ▼b ill. ; ▼c 24 cm.
440 0 ▼a Cambridge studies in linguistics ; ▼v 81
504 ▼a Includes bibliographical references (p. 391-415) and indexes.
650 0 ▼a Historical linguistics.

Holdings Information

No. Location Call Number Accession No. Availability Due Date Make a Reservation Service
No. 1 Location Main Library/Western Books/ Call Number 417.7 L346h Accession No. 111236416 Availability Available Due Date Make a Reservation Service B M

Contents information

Table of Contents

CONTENTS
Preface = xiii
Conventions, abbreviations and symbols = xxi
General prologue : time travel and signal processing = 1
1 The past, the present and the historian = 4
  1.1 The historian as mythmaker = 4
  1.2 Messages from the past : historical understanding and the problem of 'synchrony' = 9
  1.3 Making history : witnesses and interpretation = 16
  1.4 Making history : reconstruction = 21
  1.5 Making history : the role of uniformity constraints = 24
  1.6 Metaphor and access = 32
  1.7 Metaphor and metalanguage = 41
  1.8 Summary = 42
2 Written records : evidence and argument = 44
  2.1 Prologue = 44
  2.2 Hearing the inaudible = 45
    2.2.1 Graph interpretation : generalities = 45
    2.2.2 What does writing represent? = 47
    2.2.3 'Defective' alphabetic representation and the shape of reconstructive argument = 50
    2.2.4 Allophonic spelling = 57
    2.2.5 Orthographic conservatism : good and bad news = 58
  2.3 What do texts represent? Variation and e ´ tat de langue = 61
    2.3.1 Spelling variation = 61
    2.3.2 The import of variation : a test case = 63
    2.3.3 Morphological variation = 66
  2.4 Literary evidence : rhyme and metre = 68
  2.5 Metalinguistic evidence = 78
    2.5.1 Premodern phoneticians = 78
    2.5.2 Glosses and translations = 83
  2.6 What is a 'word' anyhow? Or a sentence, or text? = 93
  2.7 Desperate remedies : interpreting vs. disappearing = 96
3 Relatedness, ancestry and comparison = 104
  3.1 'Family resemblances' = 104
  3.2 Historicity : how are families possible? = 109
  3.3 Replication and shared errors = 111
  3.4 Cladistic concepts in language filiation = 113
  3.5 Homoplasy = 118
  3.6 'Sound laws', cognateness and families = 123
    3.6.1 Diagnostic characters and regular correspondences = 123
    3.6.2 'Regular sound change' = 132
    3.6.3 Comparative method : apomorphies, ancestors and etymologies = 135
  3.7 Problems and pseudo-problems = 139
    3.7.1 Variation, diffusion and competition = 139
    3.7.2 Subgrouping : non-arboriform genealogies and character-weighting = 143
    3.7.3 Multiple descent and 'hybridization = 158
  3.8 Etymologies and 'etymologies' : the hypertaxon problem = 159
  3.9 Non-phonological evidence for relationship = 169
4 Convergence and contact = 172
  4.1 Preliminaries = 172
  4.2 Homoplasy vs. plesiomorphy = 173
    4.2.1 A test case : Afrikaans diphthongization = 173
    4.2.2 Excursus : motivated and unmotivated naturalness = 177
    4.2.3 The north-European diphthongization area = 179
  4.3 Contact = 184
    4.3.1 The constraints problem = 184
    4.3.2 Sorting, 1 : 'synchronic foreignness' = 190
    4.3.3 Sorting, 2 : asymmetrical correspondences = 195
    4.3.4 Sorting, 3 : non-substantial ('structural') loans = 197
    4.3.5 Contact agendas and etymology = 201
  4.4 Endogeny vs. contact as a methodological issue = 207
  4.5 Etymologyia ex silentio : contact with lost languages = 209
5 The nature of reconstruction = 215
  5.1 Beyond filiation = 215
  5.2 Projection vs. mapping = 216
    5.2.1 Principles = 216
    5.2.2 'Quanta' and phonetic gradualism : a few suggestions = 221
    5.2.3 Morphoclines, quanta and borrowing = 225
    5.2.4 Projection again : conventions and justifications = 228
  5.3 Internal reconstruction = 232
    5.3.1 Tautolinguistic cognates and reconstruction = 232
    5.3.2 Internal reconstruction and 'abstract' morphophonemics = 234
    5.3.3 The limits of internal reconstruction = 237
  5.4 Chronology and sequence = 241
  5.5 Morphosyntactic reconstruction = 246
    5.5.1 Preliminaries = 246
    5.5.2 Reconstructing morphology : a non-example = 251
    5.5.3 Simplification and cyclicity = 252
    5.5.4 Morphological portmanteaus = 257
    5.5.5 Plesiomorphous residue = 263
    5.5.6 Directionality and morphoclines = 267
  5.6 Postscript : realism in reconstruction = 270
    5.6.1 Phonetic realism : the art of coarse transcription = 270
    5.6.2 What is a protolanguage? = 272
6 Time and change : the shape(s) of history = 277
  6.1 The nature of 'change' = 277
  6.2 Language in time : when is a change? = 281
  6.3 Linguistic time = 290
    6.3.1 Arrows and cycles = 290
    6.3.2 Epigenetic landscapes = 293
    6.3.3 Point attractors : grammaticalization and other sinks = 295
    6.3.4 Cyclical attractors = 297
    6.3.5 Chreods : conspiracy and drift = 300
    6.3.6 Stasis and punctuation = 303
  6.4 The emergence of novelty = 305
    6.4.1 Ex nihilo nihil fit? Setting the boundaries = 305
    6.4.2 The joys of junk : decomposition and bricolage = 309
    6.4.3 Exaptation = 316
    6.4.4 Non-junk exaptation : inventing new systems = 318
7 Explanation and ontology = 325
  7.1 The issues = 325
    7.1.1 Conceptual preliminaries = 325
    7.1.2 The logical structure of explanations = 328
  7.2 In which the author revisits an earlier self, and is not entirely satisfied by what he sees, but not entirely repentant = 332
  7.3 Hermeneutic explication = 336
    7.3.1 The 'hermeneutic challenge' = 336
    7.3.2 Does the mind 'shun purposeless variety'? = 340
  7.4 Function : hermeneutics and the individualist error = 352
    7.4.1 Is change 'functional', 'dysfunctional' or neutral? = 352
    7.4.2 Functional explanation : an example = 355
    7.4.3 Prophylaxis and therapy = 359
    7.4.4 Whose function? Individuals vs. collectives = 361
  7.5 'Agents' : structure, pragmatics and invisible hands = 366
  7.6 A modest ontological proposal = 370
    7.6.1 The locus of change : societies vs. populations = 370
    7.6.2 A medium-neutral evolutionary model = 376
    7.6.3 Consequences of the population model : bottlenecks, universals and 'mind' = 382
  7.7 Envoi = 384
References = 391
Index of names = 416
Subject index = 420