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Syntax : an introduction / Rev. ed

Syntax : an introduction / Rev. ed (Loan 10 times)

Material type
단행본
Personal Author
Givón, Talmy, 1936-.
Title Statement
Syntax : an introduction / T. Givón.
판사항
Rev. ed.
Publication, Distribution, etc
Amsterdam ;   Philadelphia :   J. Benjamins,   2001.  
Physical Medium
2 v. : ill. ; 24 cm.
ISBN
1588110656 (v. 1) 1588110672 (v. 2) 1588110664 (pbk. : v. 1) 1588110680 (pbk. : v. 2)
Bibliography, Etc. Note
Includes bibliographical references and indexes.
Subject Added Entry-Topical Term
Grammar, Comparative and general --Syntax. Typology (Linguistics). Functionalism (Linguistics).
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010 ▼a ?01035857
020 ▼a 1588110656 (v. 1)
020 ▼a 1588110672 (v. 2)
020 ▼a 1588110664 (pbk. : v. 1)
020 ▼a 1588110680 (pbk. : v. 2)
040 ▼a DLC ▼c DLC ▼d 211009
049 1 ▼l 111198212 ▼v 2
050 0 0 ▼a P291 ▼b .G5 2001
082 0 4 ▼a 415 ▼2 21
084 ▼a 415 ▼2 DDCK
090 ▼a 415 ▼b G539s1
100 1 ▼a Givón, Talmy, ▼d 1936-.
245 1 0 ▼a Syntax : ▼b an introduction / ▼c T. Givón.
250 ▼a Rev. ed.
260 ▼a Amsterdam ; ▼a Philadelphia : ▼b J. Benjamins, ▼c 2001.
300 ▼a 2 v. : ▼b ill. ; ▼c 24 cm.
504 ▼a Includes bibliographical references and indexes.
650 0 ▼a Grammar, Comparative and general ▼x Syntax.
650 0 ▼a Typology (Linguistics).
650 0 ▼a Functionalism (Linguistics).

Holdings Information

No. Location Call Number Accession No. Availability Due Date Make a Reservation Service
No. 1 Location Main Library/Western Books/ Call Number 415 G539s1 2 Accession No. 111198212 Availability Available Due Date Make a Reservation Service B M

Contents information

Author Introduction

Talmy Givon(지은이)

<기능 영문법 1>

Information Provided By: : Aladin

Table of Contents


CONTENTS
Preface = xv
CHAPTER 1 The functional approach to language and the typological approach to grammar = 1
 1.1 Perspective = 1
  1.1.1 Antecedence = 1
  1.1.2 Structuralism = 4
  1.1.3 Direct descent = 7
 1.2 The role of grammar in human information processing = 7
  1.2.1 The cognitive representation system = 7
  1.2.2 Peripheral sensory-motor codes = 11
  1.2.3 The grammatical code = 11
 1.3 Grammatical vs. pre-grammatical communication = 13
 1.4 The limits of conscious reflection = 16
 1.5 The theme-and-variation approach to syntax = 18
 1.6 The typological approach to grammar : Functional domains, cross-language diversity and universals = 20
  1.6.1 The functional basis of grammatical typology = 20
  1.6.2 The diachronic underpinnings of grammatical typology = 23
  1.6.3 Typology and universals of grammar = 24
  1.6.4 Ranges of typological variation = 25
 1.7 Generativity and variation = 26
  1.7.1 The bounds of rule-governedness = 26
  1.7.2 Categories, continua and prototypes = 28
 1.8 Iconicity, naturalness and markedness = 34
  1.8.1 Iconicity vs. arbitrariness = 34
  1.8.2 Markedness, complexity and frequency = 37
 1.9 On the use, and uses, of this book = 41
CHAPTER 2 The lexicon : Words and morphemes = 43
 2.1 Preliminaries = 43
  2.1.1 Recapitulation : Meaning, information, discourse = 43
  2.1.2 Semantic features and semantic fields = 43
 2.2 Lexical vs. grammatical vocabulary = 44
  2.2.1 Words and morphemes = 44
  2.2.2 Morphemic status, morphotactics, and writing systems = 48
 2.3 Major lexical word-classes = 49
  2.3.1 Membership criteria = 49
  2.3.2 Pragmatic limits of semantic taxonomies = 50
  2.3.3 Semantic limits of semantic taxonomies = 50
  2.3.4 Morphotactics : Affixes, clitics and inflections = 54
 2.4 Nouns = 55
  2.4.1 Semantic characterization = 55
  2.4.2 Syntactic characteristics = 59
  2.4.3 Morphological characteristics = 60
 2.5 Verbs = 69
  2.5.1 Semantic characterization = 69
  2.5.2 Syntactic characterization = 69
  2.5.3 Morphological characterization = 69
 2.6 Adjectives = 81
  2.6.1 Semantic characterization = 81
  2.6.2 Syntactic characterization = 84
  2.6.3 Morphological characterization = 85
 2.7 Adverbs = 87
  2.7.1 Preamble = 87
  2.7.2 Semantic characterization = 88
 2.8 Minor word classes = 94
  2.8.1 Preamble = 94
  2.8.2 Adpositions = 95
  2.8.3 Determiners = 97
  2.8.4 Independent subject and object pronouns = 99
  2.8.5 Inter-clausal connectives = 99
  2.8.6 Quantifiers, numerals and ordinals = 100
  2.8.7 Auxiliary verbs = 102
  2.8.8 Interjections = 102
CHAPTER 3 Simple verbal clauses and argument structure = 105
 3.1 Preliminaries = 105
  3.1.1 Orientation = 105
  3.1.2 States, events, and actions = 106
  3.1.3 Semantic roles = 106
  3.1.4 Grammatical relations = 108
  3.1.5 Transitivity = 109
 3.2 Phrase structure and tree diagrams = 110
  3.2.1 What the formalism is good for = 110
  3.2.2 What the formalism is not good for = 114
 3.3 The classification of verbs and simple clauses = 118
  3.3.1 Dummy-subject verbs = 118
  3.3.2 Copular clauses and copular verbs = 120
  3.3.3 Simple intransitive verbs = 125
  3.3.4 Simple transitive verbs = 126
  3.3.5 Intransitive verbs with an indirect object = 136
  3.3.6 Bi-transitive verbs = 141
  3.3.7 Verbs with clausal(verbal) complements = 149
  3.3.8 Multiple membership in verb classes = 160
 3.4 Optional participant case-roles = 161
 3.5 Distributed lexical verbs = 162
  3.5.1 Complex predicates distributed across the clause = 163
  3.5.2 Multiple stems distributed across the verbal word = 167
CHAPTER 4 Grammatical relations and case-marking systems = 173
 4.1 Orientation = 173
 4.2 Semantic roles vs. grammatical relations : The dissociation test = 173
 4.3 Formal properties of grammatical relations = 175
  4.3.1 Overt coding properties = 175
  4.3.2 Behavior-and-control properties = 177
  4.3.3 Universality and variation : The prototype approach to grammatical relations = 194
  4.3.4 Functional correlates of grammatical relations = 195
 4.4 The typology of case-marking systems = 197
  4.4.1 Preliminaries = 197
  4.4.2 Topicality and grammatical relations = 198
  4.4.3 Major types of case-marking systems = 200
 4.5 The typology of direct objects = 219
  4.5.1 Overt coding properties : Degree of grammaticalization = 219
  4.5.2 Morphological promotion-to-DO and the topicality hierarchy = 220
  4.5.3 Promotion to DO and verb-coding of semantic roles = 225
 4.6 Serial verbs, case-marking and grammatical relations = 227
 4.7 Verb-coding of case-roles = 230
CHAPTER 5 Word order = 233
 5.1 Preliminaries = 233
 5.2 Scalarity, consistency and purity of types = 234
 5.3 Rigid word-order types = 235
  5.3.1 Rigid word-order in simple(main) clauses = 235
  5.3.2 Rigid word-order in the noun phrase = 242
 5.4 Mixed word-orders = 246
  5.4.1 Mixed clausal order = 246
  5.4.2 Mixed word-order in the NP = 254
 5.5 Word-order and bound morphology = 260
  5.5.1 Reorientation = 260
  5.5.2 Case-marking morphology on nouns or NPs = 260
  5.5.3 Tense-aspect-modal morphology = 263
  5.5.4 Negation morphemes = 267
 5.6 Flexible word-order = 270
  5.6.1 Reorientation = 270
  5.6.2 Types of flexible-order languages = 271
  5.6.3 The pragmatics of word-order flexibility = 277
 5.7 So-called non-configurationality = 279
CHAPTER 6 Tense, aspect and modalityⅠ : Functional organization = 285
 6.1 Introduction = 285
 6.2 Tense = 285
 6.3 Aspect = 287
  6.3.1 Perfectivity : boundedness and duration = 287
  6.3.2 Perfective vs. imperfective = 288
  6.3.3 The perfect = 293
  6.3.4 The immediate aspect : Remote vs. vivid = 297
 6.4 Modality and mood = 300
  6.4.1 Preamble : Propositional modalities = 300
  6.4.2 Epistemic modalities = 301
  6.4.3 The distribution of modality in grammar = 302
  6.4.4 Irrealis and the subjunctive moo$$d^8$$ = 312
  6.4.5 Evidentiality and epistemic space = 326
 6.5 Communicative and cognitive aspects of tense, aspectand modality = 329
  6.5.1 Markedness = 329
  6.5.2 Frequency text-distribution = 330
  6.5.3 Cognitive considerations = 332
  6.5.4 The discourse correlates of aspect : Perfective/imperfective vs. simultaneous/sequential = 333
CHAPTER 7 Tense, aspect and modalityⅡ ; Typological organization = 337
 7.1 Reorientation = 337
 7.2 The Creole prototype = 338
 7.3 T-A-M auxiliaries and their grammaticalization = 340
 7.4 The expansion of tense = 341
 7.5 The scope-of-assertion aspect = 343
 7.6 Perfective/imperfective-based systems = 345
 7.7 A four-way dichotomy = 348
 7.8 The conflation of perfect, durative and immediate = 352
 7.9 The grammaticalization of modality = 355
  7.9.1 Marking presupposed vs. asserted information = 355
  7.9.2 Split vs. uniform marking of irrealis = 358
  7.9.3 Unified vs. split subjunctive = 360
  7.9.4 The use of perfective markers in subjunctive forms = 362
 7.10 The grammaticalization of evidentiality = 366
 7.11 Primary vs. secondary grammaticalization of T-A-M = 366
CHAPTER 8 Negation = 369
 8.1 The multiple facets of negation = 369
  8.1.1 Negation and propositional logic = 369
  8.1.2 Negation and subjective certainty = 370
  8.1.3 The communicative pragmatics of negation = 370
  8.1.4 Negation as a speech-act = 372
 8.2 The cognitive status of negation = 372
  8.2.1 Change vs. stasis = 372
  8.2.2 The ontology of negative events = 373
  8.2.3 The ontology of negative states = 375
 8.3 Negation and social interaction = 376
 8.4 The scope of negation = 378
  8.4.1 Presupposition, assertion and negation = 378
  8.4.2 Negation and contrastive focus = 380
  8.4.3 Negation and optional constituents = 381
 8.5 The morpho-syntactic typology of VP negation = 382
  8.5.1 Grammaticalization of negation markers = 382
  8.5.2 De-verbal negation markers = 382
  8.5.3 De-nominal negation markers = 383
  8.5.4 Negation and word-order = 385
 8.6 Further topics in the syntax of negation = 386
  8.6.1 The coding of negative scope = 386
  8.6.2 Diverse negation markers across grammatical contexts = 388
  8.6.3 Emphatic or NP negation = 392
  8.6.4 Negation in main vs. complement clauses = 393
  8.6.5 Depth of embedding : Syntactic, morphological, and inherent('lexical') negation = 395
  8.6.6 Negative polarity and levels of negation = 396
CHAPTER 9 Referential coherenceⅠ : Pronouns and grammatical agreement = 399
 9.1 Introduction = 399
 9.2 The semantic organization of pronominal paradigms = 400
  9.2.1 pronominal classificatory features = 400
  9.2.2 Initial selected examples = 401
 9.3 Pronoun and grammatical agreement = 407
  9.3.1 Optional clitic anaphoric pronouns(Ute) = 407
  9.3.2 Pronominal agreement on the verb = 408
 9.4 The implicational hierarchies of pronominal agreement = 416
 9.5 Foundations of the grammar anaphoric reference = 417
  9.5.1 Preamble = 417
  9.5.2 Anaphoric zero vs. unstressed anaphoric pronouns = 417
  9.5.3 Anaphoric vs. stressed independent pronouns = 418
  9.5.4 Pronouns and zero anaphors vs. definite full-NPs = 419
 9.6 Explaining the rise of pronominal agreement = 420
 9.7 Head-modifier agreement in the noun phrase = 426
 9.8 Multiple functions of grammatical agreement = 430
  9.8.1 Verb-type and transitivity(Melanesian Pidgin) = 430
  9.8.2 Marking direct vs. indirect objects(KinyaRwanda, Lunda) = 431
  9.8.3 Marking topical objects(Amharic, Machiguenga) = 432
  9.8.4 Marking definite objects(Swahili) = 433
  9.8.5 Marking main vs. subordinate clauses(Bemba) = 433
  9.8.6 Marking existential-presentative clauses(KinyaRwanda) = 433
  9.8.7 Binding NP constituents together = 434
 9.9 Indefinite and non-referring pronouns = 434
CHAPTER 10 Referential coherenceⅡ : Reference and definiteness = 437
 10.1 Introduction = 437
 10.2 Reference = 437
  10.2.1 The Real World vs. the Universe of Discourse = 437
  10.2.2 Referential intent = 439
  10.2.3 The universal quantifier and non-reference = 439
 10.3 The semantics of indefinite reference⁴ = 440
  10.3.1 Referential opacity = 441
  10.3.2 Reference and propositional modalities = 441
  10.3.3 Gradations of referentiality = 449
 10.4 Grammatical marking of indefinite reference = 450
  10.4.1 Preamble = 450
  10.4.2 The numeral 'one' as reference marker = 450
  10.4.3 The demonstrative 'this' as reference marker = 452
  10.4.4 Noun classifiers and reference markers = 453
  10.4.5 Grammatical devices that mark non-reference = 454
 10.5 The pragmatics of indefinite reference : Denotation vs. topicality = 455
 10.6 Definiteness = 459
  10.6.1 Definiteness and anaphoric reference = 459
  10.6.2 Grounding referents to the shared current speech situation(working memory, current attention focus) = 460
  10.6.3 Grounding to shared generic-lexical knowledge(permanent semantic memory) = 460
  10.6.4 Anaphoric grounding to the shared current text(long-term episodic memory) = 462
  10.6.5 Proper names and global access = 464
  10.6.6 Generic subjects = 465
  10.6.7 Gradation of definite description = 467
 10.7 Grammatical marking of definite NPs = 468
  10.7.1 Distal demonstratives = 468
  10.7.2 Noun classifiers = 469
  10.7.3 Definite-accusative markers = 470
  10.7.4 Direct object and dative shifting = 471
  10.7.5 Topicalization and definiteness = 472
  10.7.6 Pronominal object agreement = 473
  10.7.7 Definiteness, reference and case-roles = 473
 10.8 The grammar of referential coherence as mental processing instructions = 474
Bibliography = 479
Index = 493


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