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Handbook of income distribution. 1

Handbook of income distribution. 1 (Loan 17 times)

Material type
단행본
Personal Author
Atkinson, A. B. (Anthony Barnes) Bourguignon, Francois.
Title Statement
Handbook of income distribution. 1 / edited by Anthony B. Atkinson and Francois Bourguignon.
Publication, Distribution, etc
Amsterdam ;   New York :   Elvesier,   2000.  
Physical Medium
xix, 958 p. : ill. ; 25 cm.
Series Statement
Handbooks in economics ;16
ISBN
0444816313
Bibliography, Etc. Note
Includes bibliographical references and indexes.
Subject Added Entry-Topical Term
Income distribution. Economics.
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049 1 ▼l 111181126 ▼v 1
050 0 0 ▼a HB523 ▼b .H358 2000
082 0 0 ▼a 339.2 ▼2 23
084 ▼a 339.2 ▼2 DDCK
090 ▼a 339.2 ▼b H236 ▼c 1
245 0 0 ▼a Handbook of income distribution. ▼n 1 / ▼c edited by Anthony B. Atkinson and Francois Bourguignon.
260 ▼a Amsterdam ; ▼a New York : ▼b Elvesier, ▼c 2000.
300 ▼a xix, 958 p. : ▼b ill. ; ▼c 25 cm.
490 1 ▼a Handbooks in economics ; ▼v 16
504 ▼a Includes bibliographical references and indexes.
650 0 ▼a Income distribution.
650 0 ▼a Economics.
700 1 ▼a Atkinson, A. B. ▼q (Anthony Barnes)
700 1 ▼a Bourguignon, Francois.
830 0 ▼a Handbooks in economics ; ▼v bk. 16.

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No. Location Call Number Accession No. Availability Due Date Make a Reservation Service
No. 1 Location Main Library/Western Books/ Call Number 339.2 H236 1 Accession No. 111181126 Availability Available Due Date Make a Reservation Service B M
No. 2 Location Main Library/Western Books/ Call Number 339.2 H236 1 Accession No. 111715460 Availability Available Due Date Make a Reservation Service B M
No. Location Call Number Accession No. Availability Due Date Make a Reservation Service
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Contents information

Table of Contents


CONTENTS

Introduction to the Series = ⅴ

Contents of the Handbook = ⅶ

Introduction

Income Distribution and Economics / A. B. ATKINSON ; F. BOURGUIGNON = 1

 1. Factor share theories of income distribution = 5

  1.1. A simple static and competitive framework = 6

  1.2. Skilled/unskilled wage differential = 9

  1.3. CGE modelling = 11

  1.4. Capitalism and socialism = 12

  1.5. Limitations = 13

 2. Factor accumulation and income distribution = 13

  2.1. Stochastic theories = 14

  2.2. The dynastic consumption model as a benchmark and the ambiguity of bequest theories = 15

  2.3. Heterogeneity in the accumulation factor ρ and human capital theory = 16

  2.4. Market imperfections and wealth dependent accumulation rates = 17

  2.5. Accumulation rates with endogenous prices : distribution and growth = 19

 3. Labour market and income distribution = 21

  3.1. Selection theory as an economic explanation of skewness = 22

  3.2. Involuntary selection, segmentation and discrimination = 23

  3.3. Imperfect information on workers' and jobs' characteristics : sorting and matching = 24

  3.4. Imperfect observability of effort and agency problems = 25

  3.5. Conclusion of our theoretical tour d'horizon = 26

 4. Working with income distribution data = 26

  4.1. Representation of the distribution and inequality measurement = 28

  4.2. The recipient unit = 34

  4.3. Definition of income = 36

  4.4. The time dimension = 38

  4.5. Conclusion = 40

 5. Income distribution, economic inequality and social justice = 41

  5.1. The cake division problem : utilitarianism, welfarism and the measurement of inequality = 42

  5.2. Extending the concept of income to economic well-being and coping with heterogeneity = 44

  5.3. From the inequality of income to that of opportunities and social justice = 46

  5.4. Conclusion = 50

 6. Guide to the Handbook chapters = 50

 References = 53

Chapter 1

 Social Justice and Distribution of Income / A. K. SEN = 59

  1. Motivation = 60

  2. Informational basis of theories of justice = 61

  3. Utilitarianism and welfarist justice = 63

  4. Libertarian theories of justice = 68

  5. Rawlsian theory of justice = 69

  6. Quality of life, functionings and capabilities = 73

  7. Income inequality and non-income concerns = 76

  8. Is every subgroup a community? = 79

  9. Concluding remarks = 80

 References = 81

Chapter 2

 Measurement of Inequality / F. A. COWELL = 87

  1. Introduction = 89

   1.1. Inequality and income distribution = 89

   1.2. Overview = 92

  2. Distributional judgements = 93

   2.1. Income and the individual = 93

   2.2. Distributional concepts = 94

   2.3. Distributional and welfare axioms = 96

  3. Ranking distributions = 100

   3.1. Formal and informal approaches = 101

   3.2. First-order distributional dominance = 102

   3.3. Second-order distributional dominance = 103

   3.4. Tools for income distribution = 104

  4. An axiomatic approach to inequality measurement = 107

   4.1. Insights from information theory = 109

   4.2. Distance, rank and inequality = 111

  5. Welfare functions = 113

   5.1. Insights from choice under uncertainty = 113

   5.2. Basic concepts = 113

   5.3. Social welfare and inequality = 118

  6. The structure of inequality = 123

   6.1. The basic problem = 123

   6.2. Approaches to decomposition by subgroup = 124

   6.3. Applications = 128

  7. Multidimensional approaches = 130

   7.1. The general problem = 130

   7.2. Decomposition by income source = 130

   7.3. Income and needs = 131

   7.4. Distributional change = 133

  8. Empirical implementation = 133

   8.1. Some general issues = 133

   8.2. Using sample data = 135

   8.3. A standard class of inequality measures = 137

   8.4. Extensions = 140

   8.5. Small sample problems = 141

   8.6. The problem of grouped data = 142

   8.7. Modelling with functional forms = 145

   8.8. Re-using inequality measures = 149

  9. A brief conclusion = 149

 References = 150

Chapter 3

 Three Centuries of Inequality in Britain and America / P. H. LINDERT = 167

  1. Choosing issues, measures, and methods = 170

   1.1. Redistributable income or living standards = 170

   1.2. The pre-fisc focus = 171

   1.3. Causal methods = 172

   1.4. The Kuznets conjecture = 172

  2. Was there a rise in inequality sometime before 1914? = 173

   2.1. Britain, 1688-1914 = 174

   2.2. When did American inequality rise? = 186

  3. When incomes leveled = 192

   3.1. Britain = 192

   3.2. America = 195

  4. Rising inequality since the 1970s = 200

   4.1. Britain = 200

   4.2. America = 201

  5. The main sources of episodic inequality movements = 205

  6. Lessons about long-run changes = 208

   6.1. The Kuznets curve as a Milky Way = 208

   6.2. The Robin Hood paradox = 208

 References = 210

Chapter 4

 Historical Perspectives on Income Distribution : The Case of Europe / C. MORRISSON = 217

  1. Long-term evolution of national income distribution = 220

   1.1. Denmark = 221

   1.2. Norway = 223

   1.3. Sweden = 225

   1.4. Finland = 228

   1.5. The Netherlands = 229

   1.6. The German states and Germany = 231

   1.7. France = 233

  2. Intersectorial and intrasectorial inequality = 239

  3. Factors explaining the long-term evolution of distribution = 249

 Appendix A = 256

 Appendix B = 257

 Appendix C = 258

 References = 259

Chapter 5

 Empirical Evidence on Income Inequality in Industrial Countries / P. GOTTSCHALK ; T. M. SMEEDING = 261

  1. Introduction = 262

  2. Conceptual and measurement issues = 264

   2.1. Ideal measure = 264

   2.2. Impact of measurement error = 265

   2.3. Definitions and measures = 267

  3. Differences in inequality across OECD countries = 273

   3.1. Data and measurement choices = 273

   3.2. Differences in the level of inequality = 275

  4. Differences in trends in inequality = 285

   4.1. Trend in income inequality : 1980 to 1995 = 285

   4.2. Longer term trends = 292

  5. Mobility = 294

  6. Summary and research implications = 296

 References = 304

Chapter 6

 Income Poverty in Advanced Countries / M. J$$\ddot {A}$$NTTI ; S. DANZIGER = 309

  1. Introduction = 310

  2. Conceptual and practical issues in the definition of poverty = 311

   2.1. A conceptual model of household income formation and poverty = 311

   2.2. Definitions of poverty = 313

   2.3. The space for poverty measurement = 313

   2.4. Equivalence scales = 316

   2.5. Unit of analysis and intra-family distribution = 322

   2.6. The relevant accounting period = 322

   2.7. Longitudinal aspects of poverty = 324

   2.8. Poverty comparisons and sources = 324

   2.9. The poverty line = 326

   2.10. Aggregation : the choice of poverty index = 326

   2.11. Measurement errors and poverty measurement = 332

  3. Evidence about the extent of cross-sectional poverty = 333

   3.1. Changes in poverty within countries over time = 333

   3.2. Poverty orderings = 336

  4. Decomposing poverty across population groups = 344

   4.1. Comparing poverty risks of different groups = 344

   4.2. Poverty rankings of different demographic groups = 345

  5. The impact of public policy on poverty = 348

   5.1. Measuring the impact of public policy on poverty = 349

   5.2. Empirical evidence on the impact of public policy on poverty = 353

  6. Poverty dynamics = 353

   6.1. Intra-generational poverty dynamics = 353

   6.2. Family background and poverty = 358

  7. Summary = 362

 Appendix : Data sources = 363

 References = 373

Chapter 7

 Theories of the Distribution of Earnings / D. NEAL ; S. ROSEN = 379

  0. Introduction = 380

  1. The characteristic skew of earnings distributions = 381

   1.1. Stochastic process theories = 382

   1.2. Correlated increments and common factors = 383

   1.3. Scale-of-operations effects and superstars = 384

  2. Selection theory = 385

   2.1. The Roy model = 386

   2.2. Selection on ability and stratification = 389

   2.3. Factor price equalization? = 391

  3. Learning, sorting and matching = 391

   3.1. The basic learning model = 392

   3.2. Sorting by comparative advantage = 394

   3.3. Matching models = 397

   3.4. Learning and general equilibrium = 398

   3.5. Summary = 399

  4. Human capital = 400

   4.1. Compensation for investments in training = 400

   4.2. Optimal investment = 402

   4.3. Labor supply = 408

  5. Insurance, agency and earnings = 412

   5.1. Attitudes toward risk = 413

   5.2. Effort incentives and compensation in internal labor markets = 414

   5.3. Agency and performance bonds = 417

   5.4. Efficiency wage models = 419

  6. Conclusion = 421

 References = 423

Chapter 8

 Theories of Persistent Inequality and Intergenerational Mobility / T. PIKETTY = 429

  1. Introduction = 430

   1.1. The dimensions of conflict about intergenerational mobility = 430

   1.2. Organization of this chapter = 435

  2. Persistent inequality and the family transmission of wealth = 436

   2.1. The contribution of inheritance to the persistence of inequality = 436

   2.2. The long-run dynamics of wealth inequalities with exogenous savings = 438

   2.3. The long-run dynamics of wealth inequalities with dynastic utility functions = 440

   2.4. "Active" vs. "passive" inheritance : the costs of redistribution = 442

  3. Persistent inequality and the family transmission of ability = 446

   3.1. The transmission of productive abilities = 446

   3.2. Efficient inequality and the costs of redistribution = 448

   3.3. Taste-based persistent inequality = 451

  4. Persistent inequality and the imperfect capital market = 453

   4.1. Credit constraints vs. first-best credit = 453

   4.2. What do we know about the importance of credit constraints for mobility? = 456

   4.3. Poverty traps vs. low-mobility traps = 459

  5. Persistent inequality and local segregation = 462

   5.1. Models of inefficient segregation into unequal neighborhoods = 462

   5.2. The policy implications of local segregation = 464

   5.3. Other levels of segregation = 467

  6. Persistent inequality and self-fulfilling beliefs = 468

   6.1. The theory of discrimination = 468

   6.2. Sociologists' theories of self-fulfilling inequality = 471

 References = 473

Chapter 9

 Macroeconomics of Distribution and Growth / G. BERTOLA = 477

  1. Introduction = 479

   1.1. Overview = 479

   1.2. Preliminaries = 481

  2. Aggregate accumulation and distribution = 483

   2.1. Neoclassical allocation and accumulation = 483

   2.2. Factor income distribution and growth = 490

  3. Investments, savings and financial markets = 498

   3.1. Finite lives = 499

   3.2. Self-financed investment = 502

   3.3. Idiosyncratic uncertainty = 509

  4. Politics and institutions = 518

   4.1. Political sources of distortionary taxation = 520

   4.2. Dimensions of heterogeneity and distribution = 521

   4.3. The menu and timing of policies = 523

  5. Empirical evidence = 527

   5.1. Convergence across countries = 527

   5.2. Growth and inequality within countries = 531

  6. Other directions of research = 533

 References = 535

Chapter 10

 Wealth Inequality, Wealth Constraints and Economic Performance / P. BARDHAN, ; S. BOWLES ; H. GINTIS = 541

  1. Introduction = 542

  2. Wealth and efficiency when risk is noncontractible = 546

  3. Land contracts = 560

  4. Wealth, risk aversion and insurance = 567

  5. Wealth constraints and residual claimancy in team production = 577

  6. Initial asset inequality and cooperation on the local commons = 587

  7. Conclusion = 595

 References = 597

Chapter 11

 The Distribution of Wealth / J. B. DAVIES ; A. F. SHORROCKS = 605

  1. Introduction = 606

  2. Theoretical approaches = 608

   2.1. Simple models of wealth distribution = 609

   2.2. Lifecycle accumulation = 612

   2.3. Intergenerational issues = 621

   2.4. Self-made fortunes = 627

  3. Empirical evidence on wealth inequality = 628

   3.1. Household surveys = 629

   3.2. Wealth tax data = 635

   3.3. Estate multiplier estimates = 637

   3.4. The investment income method = 642

   3.5. Direct wealth estimates for named persons = 642

   3.6. Portfolio composition = 643

   3.7. Explaining national differences and changes over time = 645

  4. Applied work on the determinants of wealth distribution = 648

   4.1. Simulation studies = 648

   4.2. Intergenerational wealth mobility = 651

   4.3. The aggregate importance of inherited versus lifecycle wealth = 653

   4.4. Empirical studies of transfer behaviour = 657

  5. Summary and conclusions = 663

 References = 667

Chapter 12

 Redistribution / R. BOADWAY ; M. KEEN = 677

  1. Introduction = 679

  2. Motives for redistribution = 679

   2.1. Redistribution as social justice = 680

   2.2. Efficient redistribution = 683

   2.3. Redistribution as expropriation = 701

  3. The politics of redistribution = 701

   3.1. Direct democracy = 701

   3.2. Representative democracy = 715

   3.3. Interest groups = 721

  4. Constraints on redistribution = 732

   4.1. First-best redistribution = 733

   4.2. Imperfect information as a limit to redistribution = 735

   4.3. Restricted instruments : Linear taxes = 743

   4.4. Self-selection and nonstandard instruments = 747

   4.5. Altering the information assumptions = 750

   4.6. Cheats and liars = 751

   4.7. Time consistency = 753

   4.8. Interjurisdictional mobility = 755

   4.9. Altruism and intergenerational redistribution = 757

  5. Measuring redistribution = 757

   5.1. Methodological issues in assessing redistribution = 758

   5.2. Fiscal incidence modelling strategies = 764

   5.3. Intertemporal issues = 771

   5.4. Explaining redistribution = 776

  6. Conclusions = 777

 References = 779

Chapter 13

 Income Distribution and Development / R. KANBUR = 791

  1. Introduction and overview = 792

   1.1. Some ground clearing = 792

   1.2. Overview = 794

  2. Distribution and the process of development = 797

   2.1. The theory of development and distribution = 798

   2.2. Econometric testing = 804

   2.3. The country case study approach = 808

  3. Distribution, development and policy = 811

   3.1. Policy and the Kuznetsian literature = 811

   3.2. Macroeconomic and external sector adjustment = 813

   3.3. Redistributive policies : land, education and transfers = 818

  4. Beyond national income distributions = 824

   4.1. Inter-group distribution = 825

   4.2. Intra-household distribution = 828

   4.3. Global distribution = 830

  5. Conclusion : directions for the the next decade = 832

   5.1. Country case studies = 832

   5.2. Increasing inequality = 832

   5.3. Disaggregation = 833

   5.4. Intra-household allocation = 833

   5.5. Alternative modes of redistribution = 833

 References = 834

Chapter 14

 Income Distribution, Economic Systems and Transition / J. FLEMMING ; J. MICKLEWRIGHT = 843

  1. Introduction = 844

  2. Income distribution in socialist countries = 848

   2.1. Labour income in market and socialist economies = 848

   2.2. Data sources on income distribution under socialism = 853

   2.3. The distribution of earnings in socialist labour markets = 857

   2.4. Inequality of household incomes under socialism = 862

   2.5. Benefits in kind, subsidies and "fringe" benefits = 871

  3. Distribution in transition - theory = 875

   3.1. Transitional adjustment and the distribution of earnings = 876

   3.2. The scope for mitigating measures = 880

   3.3. Wage controls and unemployment = 882

   3.4. Reforming delivery of social services and collection of taxes = 882

   3.5. Restitution = 883

  4. Distribution in transition - evidence = 884

   4.1. Data sources in transition = 886

   4.2. The distribution of earnings in transition = 890

   4.3. Inequality of household incomes in transition = 898

   4.4. Interpreting the evidence = 905

  5. Conclusions = 909

 Appendix A = 911

 Appendix B = 912

 References = 913

Author index = 919

Subject index = 937



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