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Governmental illegitimacy in international law

Governmental illegitimacy in international law (Loan 8 times)

Material type
단행본
Personal Author
Roth, Brad R.
Title Statement
Governmental illegitimacy in international law / Brad R. Roth.
Publication, Distribution, etc
Oxford :   Clarendon Press ;   New York :   Oxford University Press,   1999.  
Physical Medium
xxx, 439 p. ; 24 cm.
ISBN
0198268521 (acid-free paper)
Bibliography, Etc. Note
Includes bibliographical references and index.
Subject Added Entry-Topical Term
Legitimacy of governments. Recognition (International law). International relations.
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001 000000671275
005 20151023111843
008 980806s1999 enk b 001 0 eng
010 ▼a 98030858
020 ▼a 0198268521 (acid-free paper)
040 ▼a DLC ▼c DLC ▼d YDX ▼d UKM ▼d FCI ▼d 211009
049 ▼l 111163546 ▼l 111198992
050 0 0 ▼a KZ4041 ▼b .R68 1999
082 0 0 ▼a 341.26 ▼2 21
084 ▼a 341.26 ▼2 DDCK
090 ▼a 341.26 ▼b R845g
100 1 ▼a Roth, Brad R.
245 1 0 ▼a Governmental illegitimacy in international law / ▼c Brad R. Roth.
260 ▼a Oxford : ▼b Clarendon Press ; ▼a New York : ▼b Oxford University Press, ▼c 1999.
300 ▼a xxx, 439 p. ; ▼c 24 cm.
504 ▼a Includes bibliographical references and index.
650 0 ▼a Legitimacy of governments.
650 0 ▼a Recognition (International law).
650 0 ▼a International relations.

Holdings Information

No. Location Call Number Accession No. Availability Due Date Make a Reservation Service
No. 1 Location Main Library/Law Library(Preservation Stacks/B2)/ Call Number 341.26 R845g Accession No. 111163546 Availability Available Due Date Make a Reservation Service B M
No. 2 Location Main Library/Law Library(Preservation Stacks/B2)/ Call Number 341.26 R845g Accession No. 111198992 Availability In loan Due Date 2021-08-14 Make a Reservation Service M

Contents information

Table of Contents


CONTENTS

Preface = xi

Acknowledgements = xiv

Foreword = xv

Abbreviations = xx

Table of Cases = xxii

Table of Treaties and United Nations Resolutions = xxiv

Chapter One : International Politics, International Law, and the Legitimacy of Domestic Governments = 1

 A. The issue : illegitimate governments as a legal category = 1

 B. Legal norms and international security = 5

 C. The paradox of sovereignty in international law = 8

Chapter Two : Legal Legitimacy in Theoretical Perspective = 17

 A. The question of legitimate authority = 20

  1. State illegitimacy : self-determination of whom? = 22

  2. Governmental illegitimacy : who speaks for the political community? = 26

  3. Humanitarian intervention and the natural duties of states = 30

 B. Legal legitimacy and international political morality = 33

Chapter Three : Popular Sovereignty and Domestic Constitutional Orders = 37

 A. Vehicles of legitimation = 41

  1. Tradition = 43

  2. Charisma = 46

  3. Legality = 48

 B. The constitutional order and its limits = 51

  1. The "constitution" in positivist jurisprudence = 51

  2. Constitutionalism = 55

   (a) A political definition of "constitution" = 55

   (b) The absence of an uncommanded commander = 57

   (c) The state of exception = 61

  3. The significance of the exception : sovereign will and the limits of constitutionalism = 64

  4. Constitutional orders and international recognition = 68

 C. The primacy of the legitimating vision = 69

Chapter Four : The Rise and Fall of Revolutionary-Democratic Dictatorship = 75

 A. Theoretical foundations of revolutionary democracy = 77

  1. "Totalitarian" democracy and positive liberty = 77

  2. The Rousseauian framework = 84

   (a) Moral freedom and the political community = 84

   (b) The general will = 87

  3. The Marxian framework = 93

   (a) Freedom and species-essence = 93

   (b) Dictatorship of the proletariat = 96

 B. Teleological democracy and vanguard dictatorship = 104

  1. The challenge of substantive democracy = 104

  2. The ruling party as vanguard of the sovereign citizenry = 106

  3. Vanguardism and the decision = 112

 C. Revolutionary-democratic dictatorship and contemporary international discourse = 113

  1. Consequences of the rise of revolutionary dictatorship = 113

  2. Consequences of the fall = 118

Chapter Five : Legal Legitimacy and Recognition of Governments: A Doctrinal Guide = 121

 A. Recognition doctrine = 124

  1. The nature of recognition = 124

  2. The objects of recognition = 129

   (a) Governments and states = 130

   (b) Governments and institutions = 133

  3. The criteria of recognition = 136

   (a) Effective control = 137

   (b) Legitimism = 142

   (c) Additional factors and limited recognition = 149

  4. Legal consequences of non-recognition = 152

 B. Recognition and intervention in internal armed conflict = 159

  1. Sovereign equality and non-intervention norms = 160

   (a) Non-intervention and popular sovereignty = 162

   (b) Non-intervention and human rights = 165

  2. Non-intervention norms and internal armed factions = 172

   (a) Recognition of insurgency = 173

   (b) Recognition of belligerency = 177

   (c) Recognition of the opposition as the de jure government = 182

  3. Military intervention by invitation = 185

  4. Military intervention by advance consent : invasion pacts = 188

 C. Legitimacy contests and modes of collective resolution = 196

Chapter Six: Ascertaining the Will of "Peoples" : Governmental Illegitimacy and Self-Determination = 201

 A. From principle to fight : self-determination in the scheme of sovereign equality = 203

  1. Evolution of the principle = 204

  2. The 1960 resolutions = 208

  3. Self-determination and the use of force = 212

  4. Self-determination and "premature" recognition of statehood : the case of Guinea-Bissau = 217

 B. Self-determination and popular will = 223

  1. Popular will and the determination of political status = 223

  2. Insurgent movement as "sole legitimate representative" = 227

 C. Local deprivations of self-determination : Rhodesia, South Africa and beyond = 234

  1. Rhodesia = 236

  2. South Africa = 243

  3. Further implications = 250

Chapter Seven : Two Governments, One State: Recognition Contests and the Use of Force = 253

 A. U. N. credentials and collective legal recognition = 255

  1. The U. N. credentials process = 255

  2. Credentials controversies = 261

   (a) China (1949-71) = 261

   (b) Hungary (1956-63) = 263

   (c) Congo-Leopoldville (1960) = 268

   (d) Yemen (1962) = 274

   (e) Cambodia/Khmer Republic (1973-74) = 276

   (f) Cambodia/Kampuchea (1979-90) = 280

  3. Recognition principles in credentials cases = 283

 B. Intervention by invitation of the legitimate government = 284

 C. Governmental illegitimacy and foreign intervention : three cases = 289

  1. Nicaragua (1979) = 290

   (a) The de-legitimation of the Somoza government = 290

   (b) Implications for the subsequent legitimacy of Sandinista rule = 297

   (c) Implications for the norm of governmental illegitimacy = 303

  2. Grenada (1983) = 303

  3. Panama (1989) = 310

 D. Recognition contests, 1950-89 : conclusions = 318

Chapter Eight : Governmental Illegitimacy and Political Participation = 321

 A. Political participation in human rights law = 324

  1. Interpretation of the right = 325

   (a) UDHR Article 21 = 325

   (b) ICCPR Article 25 = 329

   (c) Article 25 in the post-Cold War era = 333

  2. Implementation of the right = 338

  3. Conclusion : popular sovereignty and participatory rights = 343

 B. Legitimacy and quasi-plebiscitary elections = 344

  1. Demonstration elections = 346

   (a) El Salvador (1982, 1984) = 348

   (b) Nicaragua (1984) = 351

   (c) Lessons of the 1980s = 356

  2. Arbitration elections = 357

   (a) Nicaragua (1990) = 358

   (b) The spread of U. N.-sponsored electoral arbitration = 361

 C. Participation and the basis of governmental authority = 363

Chapter Nine : Haiti and Beyond : Popular Will and De-Legitimation in the 1990s = 365

 A. Collective responses to the breakdown of electoral arbitration = 366

  1. Haiti (1991-4) = 366

   (a) Background to the coup = 368

   (b) International responses to the coup, 1991-93 = 372

   (c) Enforcement measures = 377

   (d) The Haiti precedent = 383

  2. Angola (1992-93) = 387

   (a) The Failure of electoral arbitration and the resumption of civil war = 387

   (b) The Security Council response = 389

  3. Cambodia (1997-98) = 391

  4. Conclusions = 393

 B. The broader context : sovereignty and internal crises in the 1990s = 394

  1. Civil war and humanitarian catastrophe : Liberia and Somalia = 394

  2. Coups against elected governments in the 1990s = 401

  3. Sierra Leone and the New African Interventionism of the late 1990s = 405

 C. Governmental illegitimacy and collective practice = 410

Chapter Ten: Conclusion : Sovereignty and Popular Will = 413

 A. The international law of governmental illegitimacy = 413

 B. The dangers of liberal-democratic legitimism = 419

  1. The danger to democracy and popular sovereignty = 420

  2. The danger to peace = 426

 C. Conclusion = 428

Index = 431



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