HOME > Detail View

Detail View

Social network analysis : methods and applications

Social network analysis : methods and applications (Loan 102 times)

Material type
단행본
Personal Author
Wasserman, Stanley. Faust, Katherine.
Title Statement
Social network analysis : methods and applications / Stanley Wasserman, Katherine Faust.
Publication, Distribution, etc
Cambridge [England] ;   New York :   Cambridge University Press ,   1994   (2008 printing)  
Physical Medium
xxxi, 825 p. : ill. ; 23 cm.
Series Statement
Structural analysis in the social sciences ; 8
ISBN
0521382696 0521387078 (pbk.) 9780521382694 9780521387071 (pbk.)
General Note
Repr. with corrections.  
Bibliography, Etc. Note
Includes bibliographical references (p. 756-801) and indexes.
Subject Added Entry-Topical Term
Social networks -- Research -- Methodology.
000 01133camuu2200301ia 4500
001 000000667993
005 20090610162222
008 980612s1994 enka b 001 0 eng d
010 ▼a 94020602
020 ▼a 0521382696
020 ▼a 0521387078 (pbk.)
020 ▼a 9780521382694
020 ▼a 9780521387071 (pbk.)
040 ▼a ZEM ▼c ZEM ▼d 211009
050 1 4 ▼a HM131 ▼b .W356 1994
082 0 4 ▼a 302/.01/1 ▼2 22
090 ▼a 302.011 ▼b W322s
100 1 ▼a Wasserman, Stanley.
245 1 0 ▼a Social network analysis : ▼b methods and applications / ▼c Stanley Wasserman, Katherine Faust.
260 ▼a Cambridge [England] ; ▼a New York : ▼b Cambridge University Press , ▼c 1994 ▼g (2008 printing)
300 ▼a xxxi, 825 p. : ▼b ill. ; ▼c 23 cm.
490 1 ▼a Structural analysis in the social sciences ; ▼v 8
500 ▼a Repr. with corrections.
504 ▼a Includes bibliographical references (p. 756-801) and indexes.
650 0 ▼a Social networks ▼x Research ▼x Methodology.
700 1 ▼a Faust, Katherine.
830 0 ▼a Structural analysis in the social sciences ; ▼v 8.

No. Location Call Number Accession No. Availability Due Date Make a Reservation Service
No. 1 Location Main Library/Western Books/ Call Number 302.011 W322s Accession No. 111538643 Availability Available Due Date Make a Reservation Service B M
No. 2 Location Science & Engineering Library/Sci-Info(Stacks2)/ Call Number 302.011 W322s Accession No. 121181201 Availability Available Due Date Make a Reservation Service B M
No. Location Call Number Accession No. Availability Due Date Make a Reservation Service
No. 1 Location Main Library/Western Books/ Call Number 302.011 W322s Accession No. 111538643 Availability Available Due Date Make a Reservation Service B M
No. Location Call Number Accession No. Availability Due Date Make a Reservation Service
No. 1 Location Science & Engineering Library/Sci-Info(Stacks2)/ Call Number 302.011 W322s Accession No. 121181201 Availability Available Due Date Make a Reservation Service B M

Contents information

Table of Contents


CONTENTS
List of Tables = xxi
List of Illustrations = xxiv
Preface = xxix
Part I: Networks, Relations, and Structure = 1
 1 Social Network Analysis in the Social and Behavioral Sciences = 3
  1.1 The Social Networks Perspective = 4
  1.2 Historical and Theoretical Foundations = 10
   1.2.1 Empirical Motivations = 11
   1.2.2 Theoretical Motivations = 13
   1.2.3 Mathematical Motivations = 15
   1.2.4 In Summary = 16
  1.3 Fundamental Concepts in Network Analysis = 17
  1.4 Distinctive Features = 21
  1.5 Organization of the Book and How to Read It = 22
   1.5.1 Complexity = 23
   1.5.2 Descriptive and Statistical Methods = 23
   1.5.3 Theory Driven Methods = 24
   1.5.4 Chronology = 24
   1.5.5 Levels of Analysis = 25
   1.5.6 Chapter Prerequisites = 26
  1.6 Summary = 27
 2 Social Network Data = 28
  2.1 Introduction: What Are Network Data? = 28
   2.1.1 Structural and Composition Variables = 29
   2.1.2 Modes = 29
   2.1.3 Affiliation Variables = 30
  2.2 Boundary Specification and Sampling = 30
   2.2.1 What Is Your Population? = 31
   2.2.2 Sampling = 33
  2.3 Types of Networks = 35
   2.3.1 One-Mode Networks = 36
   2.3.2 Two-Mode Networks = 39
   2.3.3 Ego-centered and Special Dyadic Networks = 41
  2.4 Network Data, Measurement and Collection = 43
   2.4.1 Measurement = 43
   2.4.2 Collection = 45
   2.4.3 Longitudinal Data Collection = 55
   2.4.4 Measurement Validity, Reliability, Accuracy, Error = 56
  2.5 Data Sets Found in These Pages = 59
   2.5.1 Krackhardt's High-tech Managers = 60
   2.5.2 Padgett's Florentine Families = 61
   2.5.3 Freeman's EIES Network = 62
   2.5.4 Countries Trade Data = 64
   2.5.5 Galaskiewicz's CEOs and Clubs Network = 65
   2.5.6 Other Data = 66
Part II: Mathematical Representations of Social Networks = 67
 3 Notation for Social Network Data = 69
  3.1 Graph Theoretic Notation = 71
  3.1.1 A Single Relation = 71
  3.1.2 Multiple Relations = 73
  3.1.3 Summary = 75
  3.2 Sociometric Notation = 77
  3.2.1 Single Relation = 79
  3.2.2 Multiple Relations = 81
  3.2.3 Summary = 83
  3.3 Algebraic Notation = 84
  3.4 Two Sets of Actors = 85
  3.4.1 Different Types of Pairs = 86
  3.4.2 Sociometric Notation = 87
  3.5 Putting It All Together = 89
 4 Graphs and Matrices = 92
  4.1 Why Graphs? = 93
  4.2 Graphs = 94
   4.2.1 Subgraphs, Dyads, and Triads = 97
   4.2.2 Nodal Degree = 100
   4.2.3 Density of Graphs and Subgraphs = 101
   4.2.4 Example: Padgett's Florentine Faroilies = 103
   4.2.5 Walks, Trails, and Paths = 105
   4.2.6 Connected Graphs and Components = 109
   4.2.7 Geodesies, Distance, and Diameter = 110
   4.2.8 Connectivity of Graphs = 112
   4.2.9 Isomorphic Graphs and Subgraphs = 117
   4.2.10 Special Kinds of Graphs = 119
  4.3 Directed Graphs = 121
   4.3.1 Subgraphs-Dyads = 124
   4.3.2 Nodal Indegree and Outdegree = 125
   4.3.3 Density of a Directed Graph = 129
   4.3.4 An Example = 129
   4.3.5 Directed Walks, Paths, Semipaths = 129
   4.3.6 Reachability and Connectivity in Digraphs = 132
   4.3.7 Geodesies, Distance and Diameter = 134
   4.3.8 Special Kinds of Directed Graphs = 134
   4.3.9 Summary = 136
  4.4 Signed Graphs and Signed Directed Graphs = 136
   4.4.1 Signed Graph = 137
   4.4.2 Signed Directed Graphs = 138
  4.5 Valued Graphs and Valued Directed Graphs = 140
   4.5.1 Nodes and Dyads = 142
   4.5.2 Density in a Valued Graph = 143
   4.5.3 Paths in Valued Graphs = 143
  4.6 Multigraphs = 145
  4.7 Hypergraphs = 146
  4.8 Relations = 148
   4.8.1 Definition = 148
   4.8.2 Properties of Relations = 149
  4.9 Matrices = 150
   4.9.1 Matrices for Graphs = 150
   4.9.2 Matrices for Digraphs = 152
   4.9.3 Matrices for Valued Graphs = 153
   4.9.4 Matrices for Two-Mode Networks = 154
   4.9.5 Matrices for Hypergraphs = 154
   4.9.6 Basic Matrix Operations = 154
   4.9.7 Computing Simple Network Properties = 159
   4.9.8 Summary = 164
  4.10 Properties = 164
   4.10.1 Reflexivity = 164
   4.10.2 Symmetry = 165
   4.10.3 Transitivity = 165
  4.11 Summary = 165
Part III: Structural and Locational Properties = 167
 5 Centrality and Prestige = 169
  5.1 Prominence: Centrality and Prestige = 172
   5.1.1 Acior Centrality = 173
   5.1.2 Actor Prestige = 174
   5.1.3 Group Centralization and Group Prestige = 175
  5.2 Nondirectional Relations = 177
   5.2.1 Degree Centrality = 178
   5.2.2 Closeness Centrality = 183
   5.2.3 Betweenness Centrality = 188
   5.2.4 Information Centrality = 192
  5.3 Directional Relations = 198
   5.3.1 Centrality = 199
   5.3.2 Prestige = 202
   5.3.3 A Different Example = 210
  5.4 Comparisons and Extensions = 215
 6 Structural Balance and Transitivity = 220
  6.1 Structural Balance = 222
   6.1.1 Signed Nondirectional Relations = 223
   6.1.2 Signed Directional Relations = 228
   6.1.3 Checking for Balance = 230
   6.1.4 An Index for Balance = 232
   6.1.5 Summary = 232
  6.2 Clusterability = 233
   6.2.1 The Clustering Theorems = 235
   6.2.2 Summary = 238
  6.3 Generalizations of Clusterability = 239
   6.3.1 Empirical Evidence = 239
   6.3.2 Ranked Clusterability = 240
   6.3.3 Summary = 242
  6.4 Transitivity = 243
  6.5 Conclusion = 247
 7 Cohesive Subgroups = 249
  7.1 Background = 250
   7.1.1 Social Group and Subgroup = 250
   7.1.2 Notation = 252
  7.2 Subgroups Based on Complete Mutuality = 253
   7.2.1 Definition of a Clique = 254
   7.2.2 An Example = 254
   7.2.3 Considerations = 256
  7.3 Reachability and Diameter = 257
   7.3.1 n-cliques = 258
   7.3.2 An Example = 259
   7.3.3 Considerations = 260
   7.3.4 n-clans and n-clubs = 260
   7.3.5 Summary = 262
  7.4 Subgroups Based on Nodal Degree = 263
   7.4.1 k-plexes = 265
   7.4.2 k-cores = 266
  7.5 Comparing Within to Outside Subgroup Ties = 267
   7.5.1 LS Sets = 268
   7.5.2 Lambda Sets = 269
  7.6 Measures of Subgroup Cohesion = 270
  7.7 Directional Relations = 273
   7.7.1 Cliques Based on Reciprocated Ties = 273
   7.7.2 Connectivity in Directional Relations = 274
   7.7.3 n-cliques in Directional Relations = 275
  7.8 Valued Relations = 277
   7.8.1 Cliques, n-cliques, and k-plexes = 278
   7.8.2 Other Approaches for Valued Relations = 282
  7.9 Interpretation of Cohesive Subgroups = 283
  7.10 Other Approaches = 284
   7.10.1 Matrix Permutation Approaches = 284
   7.10.2 Multidimensional Scaling = 287
   7.10.3 Factor Analysis = 290
  7.11 Summary = 290
 8 Affiliations and Overlapping Subgroups = 291
  8.1 Affiliation Networks = 291
  8.2 Background = 292
   8.2.1 Theory = 292
   8.2.2 Concepts = 294
   8.2.3 Applications and Rationale = 295
  8.3 Representing Affiliation Networks = 298
   8.3.1 The Affiliation Network Matrix = 298
   8.3.2 Bipartite Graph = 299
   8.3.3 Hypergraph = 303
   8.3.4 Simplices and Simplicial Complexes = 306
   8.3.5 Summary = 306
   8.3.6 An example: Galaskiewicz's CEOs and Clubs = 307
  8.4 One-mode Networks = 307
   8.4.1 Definition = 307
   8.4.2 Examples = 309
  8.5 Properties of Affiliation Networks = 312
   8.5.1 Properties of Actors and Events = 312
   8.5.2 Properties of One-mode Networks = 314
   8.5.3 Taking Account of Subgroup Size = 322
   8.5.4 Interpretation = 324
  8.6 Analysis of Actors and Events = 326
   8.6.1 Galois Lattices = 326
   8.6.2 Correspondence Analysis = 334
  8.7 Summary = 342
Part IV: Roles and Positions = 345
 9 Structural Equivalence = 347
  9.1 Background = 348
   9.1.1 Social Roles and Positions = 348
   9.1.2 An Overview of Positional and Role Analysis = 351
   9.1.3 A Brief History = 354
  9.2 Definition of Structural Equivalence = 356
   9.2.1 Definition = 356
   9.2.2 An Example = 357
   9.2.3 Some Issues in Defining Structural Equivalence = 359
  9.3 Positional Analysis = 361
   9.3.1 Simplification of Multirelational Networks = 361
   9.3.2 Tasks in a Positional Analysis = 363
  9.4 Measuring Structural Equivalence = 366
   9.4.1 Euclidean Distance as a Measure of Structural Equivalence = 367
   9.4.2 Correlation as a Measure of Structural Equivalence = 368
   9.4.3 Some Considerations in Measuring Structural Equivalence = 370
  9.5 Representation of Network Positions = 375
   9.5.1 Partitioning Actors = 375
   9.5.2 Spatial Representations of Actor Equivalences = 385
   9.5.3 Ties Between and Within Positions = 388
  9.6 Summary = 391
 10 Blockmodels = 394
  10.1 Definition = 395
  10.2 Building Blocks = 397
   10.2.1 Perfect Fit (Fat Fit) = 398
   10.2.2 Zeroblock (Lean Fit) Criterion = 399
   10.2.3 Oneblock Criterion = 400
   10.2.4 a Density Criterion = 400
   10.2.5 Comparison of Criteria = 401
   10.2.6 Examples = 401
   10.2.7 Valued Relations = 406
  10.3 Interpretation = 408
   10.3.1 Actor Attributes = 408
   10.3.2 Describing Individual Positions = 411
   10.3.3 Image Matrices = 417
  10.4 Summary = 423
 11 Relational Algebras = 425
  11.1 Background = 426
  11.2 Notation and Algebraic Operations = 428
   11.2.1 Composition and Compound Relations = 429
   11.2.2 Properties of Composition and Compound Relations = 432
  11.3 Multiplication Tables for Relations = 433
   11.3.1 Multiplication Tables and Relational Structures = 435
   11.3.2 An Example = 439
  11.4 Simplification of Role Tables = 442
   11.4.1 Simplification by Comparing Images = 443
   11.4.2 Homomorphic Reduction = 445
  11.5 Comparing Role Structures = 449
   11.5.1 Joint Homomorphic Reduction = 451
   11.5.2 The Common Structure Semigroup = 452
   11.5.3 An Example = 453
   11.5.4 Measuring the Similarity of Role Structures = 457
  11.6 Summary = 460
 12 Network Positions and Roles = 461
  12.1 Background = 462
   12.1.1 Theoretical Definitions of Roles and Positions = 462
   12.1.2 Levels of Rote Analysis in Social Networks = 464
   12.1.3 Equivalences in Networks = 466
  12.2 Structural Equivalence, Revisited = 468
  12.3 Automorphic and Isomorphic Equivalence = 469
   12.3.1 Definition = 470
   12.3.2 Example = 471
   12.3.3 Measuring Automorphic Equivalence = 472
  12.4 Regular Equivalence = 473
   12.4.1 Definition of Regular Equivalence = 474
   12.4.2 Regular Equivalence for Nondirectional Relations = 475
   12.4.3 Regular Equivalence Blockmodels = 476
   12.4.4 A Measure of Regular Equivalence = 479
   12.4.5 An Example = 481
  12.5 "Types" of Ties = 483
   12.5.1 An Example = 485
  12.6 Local Role Equivalence = 487
   12.6.1 Measuring Local Role Dissimilarity = 488
   12.6.2 Examples = 491
  12.7 Ego Algebras = 494
   12.7.1 Definition of Ego Algebras = 496
   12.7.2 Equivalence of Ego Algebras = 497
   12.7.3 Measuring Ego Algebra Similarity = 497
   12.7.4 Examples = 499
  12.8 Discussion = 502
Part V: Dyadic and Triadic Methods = 503
 13 Dyads = 505
  13.1 An Overview = 506
  13.2 An Example and Some Definitions = 508
  13.3 Dyads = 510
   13.3.1 The Dyad Census = 512
   13.3.2 The Example and It? Dyad Census = 513
   13.3.3 An Index for Mutuality = 514
   13.3.4 A Second Index for Mutuality = 518
   13.3.5 Subgraph Analysis, in General = 520
  13.4 Simple Distributions = 522
   13.4.1 The Uniform Distribution - A Review = 524
   13.4.2 Simple Distributions on Digraphs = 526
  13.5 Statistical Analysis of the Number of Arcs = 528
   13.5.1 Testing = 529
   13.5.2 Estimation = 533
  13.6 Conditional Uniform Distributions = 535
   13.6.1 Uniform Distribution, Conditional on the Number of Arcs = 536
   13.6.2 Uniform Distribution, Conditional on the Outdegrees = 537
  13.7 Statistical Analysis of the Number of Mutuals = 539
   13.7.1 Estimation = 540
   13.7.2 Testing = 542
   13.7.3 Examples = 543
  13.8 Other Conditional Uniform Distributions = 544
   13.8.1 Uniform Distribution, Conditional on the Indegrees = 545
   13.8.2 The U$$\mid$$MAN Distribution = 547
   13.8.3 More Complex Distributions = 550
  13.9 Other Research = 552
  13.10 Conclusion = 555
 14 Triads = 556
  14.1 Random Models and Substantive Hypotheses = 558
  14.2 Triads = 559
   14.2.1 The Triad Census = 564
   14.2.2 The Example and Its Triad Census = 574
  14.3 Distribution ,of a Triad Census = 575
   14.3.1 Mean and Variance of a k-subgraph Census = 576
   14.3.2 Mean and Variance of a Triad Census = 579
   14.3.3 Return to the Example = 581
   14.3.4 Mean and Variance of Linear Combinations of a Triad Census = 582
   14.3.5 A Brief Review = 584
  14.4 Testing Structural Hypotheses = 585
   14.4.1 Configurations = 585
   14.4.2 From Configurations to Weighting Vectors = 590
   14.4.3 From Weighting Vectors to Test Statistics = 592
   14.4.4 An Example = 595
   14.4.5 Another Example―Testing for Transitivity = 596
  14.5 Generalizations and Conclusions = 598
  14.6 Summary = 601
Part VI: Statistical Dyadic Interaction Models = 603
 15 Statistical Analysis of Single Relational Networks = 605
  15.1 Single Directional Relations = 607
   15.1.1 The Y-array = 608
   15.1.2 Modeling the Y-array = 612
   15.1.3 Parameters = 619
   15.1.4 Is $$p_1$$ a Random Directed Graph Distribution? = 633
   15.1.5 Summary = 634
  15.2 Attribute Variables = 635
   15.2.1 Introduction = 636
   15.2.2 The W-array = 637
   15.2.3 The Basic Model with Attribute Variables = 640
   15.2.4 Examples: Using Attribute Variables = 646
  15.3 Related Models for Further Aggregated Data = 649
   15.3.1 Strict Relational Analysis―The V-array = 651
   15.3.2 Ordinal Relational Data = 654
  15.4 Nondireclional Relations = 656
   15.4.1 A Model = 656
   15.4.2 An Example = 657
  15.5 Recent Generalizations of $$p_1$$ = 658
  15.6 Single Relations and Two Sets of Actors = 662
   15.6.1 Introduction = 662
   15.6.2 The Basic Model = 663
   15.6.3 Aggregating Dyads for Two-mode Networks = 664
  15.7 Computing for Log-linear Models = 665
   15.7.1 Computing Packages = 666
   15.7.2 From Printouts to Parameters = 671
  15.8 Summary = 673
 16 Stochastic Blockmodels and Goodness-of-Fit Indices = 675
  16.1 Evaluating Blockmodels = 678
   16.1.1 Goodness-of-Fit Statistics for Blockmodels = 679
   16.1.2 Structurally Based Blockmodels and Permutation Tests = 688
   16.1.3 An Example = 689
  16.2 Stochastic Blockmodels = 692
   16.2.1 Definition of a Stochastic Blockmodel = 694
   16.2.2 Definition of Stochastic Equivalence = 696
   16.2.3 Application to Special Probability Functions = 697
   16.2.4 Goodness-of-Fit Indices for Stochastic Blockmodels = 703
   16.2.5 Stochastic a posteriori Blockmodels = 706
   16.2.6 Measures of Stochastic Equivalence = 708
   16.2.7 Stochastic Blockmodel Representations = 709
   16.2.8 The Example Continued = 712
  16.3 Summary: Generalizations and Extensions = 719
   16.3.1 Statistical Analysis of Multiple Relational Networks = 719
   16.3.2 Statistical Analysis of Longitudinal Relations = 721
Part VII: Epilogue = 725
 17 Future Directions = 727
  17.1 Statistical Models = 727
  17.2 Generalizing to New Kinds of Data = 729
   17.2.1 Multiple Relations = 730
   17.2.2 Dynamic and Longitudinal Network Models = 730
   17.2.3 Ego-centered Networks = 731
  17.3 Data Collection = 731
  17.4 Sampling = 732
  17.5 General Propositions about Structure = 732
  17.6 Computer Technology = 733
  17.7 Networks and Standard Social and Behavioral Science = 733
Appendix A Computer Programs = 735
Appendix B Data = 738
References = 756
Name Index = 802
Subject Index = 811
List of Notation = 819


New Arrivals Books in Related Fields

주니어미디어오늘 (2021)
Dainton, Marianne (2021)
Le Bon, Gustave (2021)