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On reconstructing grammar : comparative Cariban morphosyntax

On reconstructing grammar : comparative Cariban morphosyntax (Loan 1 times)

Material type
단행본
Personal Author
Gildea, Spike.
Title Statement
On reconstructing grammar : comparative Cariban morphosyntax / Spike Gildea.
Publication, Distribution, etc
New York :   Oxford University Press,   1998.  
Physical Medium
xv, 284 p. ; 25 cm.
Series Statement
Oxford studies in anthropological linguistics ; v. 18
ISBN
019510952X (cloth : alk. paper)
Bibliography, Etc. Note
Includes bibliographical references (p. 269-280) and index.
Subject Added Entry-Topical Term
Reconstruction (Linguistics) -- Case studies. Cariban languages -- Grammar, Comparative -- Case studies. Reconstruction (Linguistics) -- Case studies. Cariban languages -- Grammar, Comparative -- Case studies.
000 01047camuu2200277 a 4500
001 000000646324
005 19990928154918
008 980528s1998 nyu b 001 0 eng
010 ▼a 98024621
020 ▼a 019510952X (cloth : alk. paper)
040 ▼a DLC ▼c DLC ▼d UKM ▼d TJC
049 ▼l 111137806
050 0 0 ▼a P143.2 ▼b .G55 1998
082 0 0 ▼a 415 ▼2 21
090 ▼a 415 ▼b G468o
100 1 ▼a Gildea, Spike.
245 1 0 ▼a On reconstructing grammar : ▼b comparative Cariban morphosyntax / ▼c Spike Gildea.
260 ▼a New York : ▼b Oxford University Press, ▼c 1998.
300 ▼a xv, 284 p. ; ▼c 25 cm.
440 0 ▼a Oxford studies in anthropological linguistics ; ▼v v. 18
504 ▼a Includes bibliographical references (p. 269-280) and index.
650 0 ▼a Reconstruction (Linguistics) ▼x Case studies.
650 0 ▼a Cariban languages ▼x Grammar, Comparative ▼x Case studies.
650 4 ▼a Reconstruction (Linguistics) ▼x Case studies.
650 4 ▼a Cariban languages ▼x Grammar, Comparative ▼x Case studies.

Holdings Information

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Contents information

Table of Contents


CONTENTS
Part Ⅰ Introduction
  1 An Overview of the Cariban Language Family = 3
    1.1 Classifications = 3
    1.2 The Languages Discussed in This Study = 11
  2 The Problem : Different Modern Verbal Systems and Their Synchronic Distribution = 15
    2.1 Morphosyntactic Properties of Each Verbal System = 16
    2.2 Distribution of the Seven Systems in Synchronic Languages = 26
    2.3 Possible Hypotheses to Account for the Distribution of the Seven Verbal Systems = 29
  3 How to Identify Innovative Grammatical Constructions = 31
    3.1 Definition of Terms = 31
    3.2 On the Universal Sources of New Grammar = 35
    3.3 The Expected Patterns of Evidence = 39
    3.4 On the Gradual and Sometimes Ambiguous Nature of Syntactic Change = 41
    3.5 On the Competition between Conservative and Innovative Expressions = 42
    3.6 On Reconstructing Morphosyntax = 44
  4 Set Ⅰ as Conservative and the Rest as Innovative = 45
    4.1 The Comparative Distribution of the Seven Verbal Systems = 45
    4.2 Reconstructing Set I as a Verbal System for Proto-Carib = 47
    4.3 The Other Six Systems as Innovative Reanalyses = 52
Part Ⅱ The Proto-Carib Verbal and Nominal Systems
  5 Set I as the Proto-Carib Main Clause Verbal System = 57
    5.1 Word Order : Direct and Local versus 3A3O versus Inverse = 58
    5.2 Personal Prefixes = 79
    5.3 Set I Tense-Aspect Modality(-Number) Suffixes = 96
    5.4 Conclusion = 101
  6 The Morphosyntax of Possession in Proto-Carib = 104
    6.1 Word Order and Possessive Prefixation = 105
    6.2 Personal Possessive Prefixes Plus *y- 'Relator' = 113
    6.3 Number : The Collective Particle *komo = 116
  7 The Morphosyntax of Proto-Carib Nominalizations = 119
    7.1 The Nominalizing Suffixes = 119
    7.2 The Ergative Morphosyntax of Cariban Nominalizations = 121
    7.3 The Idiosyncratic O Nominalizing Prefix *n- = 128
  8 Other Proto-Carib Deverbal Forms = 134
    8.1 The Infinitive Suffix* -no = 134
    8.2 The -topo me/pe 'Purpose' Adverbial = 138
    8.3 Derivatives of Proto-Caribl* -ce 'Participial' = 140
Part Ⅲ Reconstructing the Innovative Verbal Systems
  9 The Full Set Ⅱ Verbal System (Ergative) = 161
    9.1 The Pleonastic Pivot and the Action Nominalizer* -ri = 163
    9.2 The-ri ma Future : Another Pleonastic Pivot = 168
    9.3 The* -tupu and* -sapo Past Perfectives : An S/O Pivot = 172
    9.4 The Attributive Futures with pe/me : Another Pleonastic Pivot = 179
  10 The Partial Set Ⅱ Verbal System (Ergative/Nominative) = 183
    10.1 The Simple Nominalization Source with an S/A Pivot = 183
    10.2 The Attributive Source with an S/A Pivot = 188
  11 The De-ergative Verbal System (Nominative) = 190
    11.1 The De-ergative in Kuik e ´ ru and Kalapalo = 191
    11.2 The Panare Subject Focus Morpheme = 193
    11.3 Other Languages with Potentially Innovative O Nominalizations = 195
  12 The Progressive Verbal System (Nominative) = 197
    12.1 The Nominalization/Infinitive Plus *poko Source : S/A Pivot = 198
    12.2 The Clear Case of the Panare Progressive = 205
    12.3 The Pem o ´ n Group : Disputed Reanalysis = 206
    12.4 A Second Clear Case : The Nonpast Continuative in Apalai = 210
    12.5 The Idiosyncratic Imperfective in Kaxuyana = 213
    12.6 Other Languages with Potentially Innovative Progressive Systems = 216
  13 The *t-V-ce Verbal System (Ergative) = 218
    13.1 Stages Ⅰ and Ⅱ : The Passive/Perfect = 220
    13.2 Stage Ⅲ : Inverse Voice in Carib of Surinam = 222
    13.3 Between Inverse and Ergative : The *t-V-ce Construction in Apala i ´ = 224
    13.4 Stage Ⅳ Past Completive in Wayana and Tiriy o ´ = 226
    13.5 Cases in Need of Further Research = 230
  14 The *t-V-ce-mi Verbal System (Nominative) = 233
    14.1 Possible Cases of Reanalysis in Intransitive Clauses = 234
    14.2 The Clear Case of Reanalysis : Panare = 236
Part Ⅳ Concluding Remarks
  15 Reanalysis, Typology, Classification, and Fieldwork = 239
    15.1 The Controversy over Reanalysis and Actualization = 239
    15.2 On the Semantic Sources of Innovative TAM Markers = 242
    15.3 On the Passive as the Universal Source of Ergativity = 246
    15.4 Universals of Split Ergativity : A Transitional Violation = 247
    15.5 On Syntactic Innovation and Genetic Classification = 248
    15.6 Toward Further Descriptions of Synchronic Cariban Languages = 250
Notes = 253
Bibliography = 269
Index = 281

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