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Conversational routines in English : convention and creativity

Conversational routines in English : convention and creativity (Loan 17 times)

Material type
단행본
Personal Author
Aijmer, Karin.
Title Statement
Conversational routines in English : convention and creativity / Karin Aijmer.
Publication, Distribution, etc
London ;   New York :   Longman,   1996.  
Physical Medium
xvi, 251 p. : ill. ; 22 cm.
Series Statement
Studies in language and linguistics.
ISBN
0582082110 (Ppr) 0582082129 (Csd)
Bibliography, Etc. Note
Includes bibliographical references (p. 235-245) and index.
Subject Added Entry-Topical Term
English language --Spoken English. English language --Discourse analysis. English language --Prosodic analysis. Computational linguistics. Conversation. Semiotics.
비통제주제어
English language,,
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001 000000614750
005 19981112134735.0
008 960404s1996 enka b 001 0 eng
010 ▼a 96017540
020 ▼a 0582082110 (Ppr)
020 ▼a 0582082129 (Csd)
040 ▼a DLC ▼c DLC ▼d YDX ▼d IAY ▼d UKM
049 1 ▼l 111114159
050 0 0 ▼a PE1074.8 ▼b .A37 1996
082 0 0 ▼a 420/.141 ▼2 20
090 ▼a 420.141 ▼b A289c
100 1 ▼a Aijmer, Karin.
245 1 0 ▼a Conversational routines in English : ▼b convention and creativity / ▼c Karin Aijmer.
260 ▼a London ; ▼a New York : ▼b Longman, ▼c 1996.
300 ▼a xvi, 251 p. : ▼b ill. ; ▼c 22 cm.
490 1 ▼a Studies in language and linguistics.
504 ▼a Includes bibliographical references (p. 235-245) and index.
650 0 ▼a English language ▼x Spoken English.
650 0 ▼a English language ▼x Discourse analysis.
650 0 ▼a English language ▼x Prosodic analysis.
650 0 ▼a Computational linguistics.
650 0 ▼a Conversation.
650 0 ▼a Semiotics.
653 0 ▼a English language
830 0 ▼a Studies in language and linguistics (London, England)

Holdings Information

No. Location Call Number Accession No. Availability Due Date Make a Reservation Service
No. 1 Location Main Library/Western Books/ Call Number 420.141 A289c Accession No. 111114159 Availability Available Due Date Make a Reservation Service B M

Contents information

Table of Contents


CONTENTS

Preface = xiii

Acknowledgements = xvi

CHAPTER ONE : Introduction = 1

 1.1 Aim and scope of the present study = 1

 1.2 Material and method = 3

 1.3 Frequency of conversational routines in spoken language = 6

 1.4 Psychological aspects of conversational routines = 7

 1.5 Conversational routines and ritualization = 9

 1.6 Lexicalization, grammaticalization and idiomatization = 10

 1.7 Conversational routines and meaning = 11

 1.8 Criteria of fixedness = 12

  1.8.1 Repetitive phrases and pragmatic idioms = 13

  1.8.2 Prosodic fixedness = 14

 1.9 The processing of conversational routines = 15

 1.10 Routines and discourse = 17

 1.11 Conversational routines and grammatical analysis = 18

  1.11.1 Grammatical deficiency = 18

  1.11.2 Syntactic integration and position = 19

 1.12 A model for describing the structural flexibility of conversational routines = 21

 1.13 The pragmatic function of conversational routines = 24

  1.13.1 Conversational routines and illocutionary force = 24

  1.13.2 indirect speech acts = 24

  1.13.3 Conventionalization of indirect speech acts = 25

 1.14 The pragmatics of conversational routines = 26

  1.14.1 Conversational routines and frames = 26

  1.14.2 Factors of speech-act frames = 27

 1.15 Conversational routines and language teaching = 28

CHAPTER TWO : Thanking = 33

 2.1 Introduction = 33

 2.2 Thank you / thanks as an illocutionary force indicating device = 34

 2.3 Thanking and politeness = 35

 2.4 Strategies of thanking = 35

 2.5 Gratitude expressions = 39

 2.6 Continuation patterns = 39

 2.7 The grammatical analysis of gratitude expressions = 41

 2.8 Prosody and fixedness = 41

 2.9 Distribution of thanking over different texts = 42

 2.10 Thank you / thanks as stems = 44

  2.10.1 Expanded forms of thanking = 45

  2.10.2 Thanking and intensification = 46

  2.10.3 Prosody and intensification = 47

  2.10.4 Patterns of compound thanks = 48

 2.11 The functions of gratitude expressions = 51

  2.11.1 Thanking and ritualization = 51

 2.12 Thanking as a discourse marker = 52

  2.12.1 Thanking as a closing signal in adjacency triplets = 54

  2.12.2 Thanking in proposal-acceptance sequences = 56

  2.12.3 Thanking in telephone closings = 58

  2.12.4 Thanking in different turn positions = 65

 2.13 The pragmatics of thanking = 66

  2.13.1 The constraints caused by the object of gratitude = 66

 2.14 Frames for thanking = 75

  2.14.1 Variation in standard situations = 77

 2.15 Conclusion = 78

CHAPTER THREE : Apologies = 80

 3.1 Introduction = 80

 3.2 Defining apologies = 81

 3.3 Apologizing strategies = 82

 3.4 The from of apologizing = 84

 3.5 Continuation patterns = 87

 3.6 The grammatical analysis of apology expressions = 88

 3.7 Apologies and prosody = 88

 3.8 Distribution of apologies over different texts = 89

 3.9 Collocational fixedness and flexibility = 91

  3.9.1 Fully expanded apology expressions = 91

  3.9.2 Apologizing and intensification = 93

  3.9.3 Prosodic devices emphasizing the politeness expressed by the apology = 94

  3.9.4 Compound apologies = 94

 3.10 Apologies and function = 97

 3.11 Retrospective and anticipatory apologies = 98

  3.11.1 Disarming apologies = 100

   3.11.1.1 Disarmers and corrections = 102

   3.11.1.2 Disarmers as requests for repetition = 102

   3.11.1.3 Disarmers in dispreferred responses = 103

 3.12 The structural function of apologies = 106

  3.12.1 Apologies in telephone openings = 106

  3.12.2 Apologies in telephone closings = 106

 3.13 The type of offence = 108

  3.13.1 Talk offences = 109

  3.13.2 Time offences = 114

  3.13.3 Space offences = 115

  3.13.4 Offences involving social behaviour = 115

  3.13.5 Offences involving inconvenience = 116

 3.14 Apologies and pragmatic frames = 118

  3.14.1 Frames for standard situations = 119

 3.15 Conclusion = 121

CHAPTER FOUR : Requests and offers = 124

 4.1 Introduction = 124

 4.2 The speech act assignment mechanism and indirect speech acts = 124

 4.3 Indirect speech acts and pragmatic principles = 126

 4.4 Indirect speech acts and implicature = 127

 4.5 Pragmatic ambiguity = 128

 4.6 Defining requests = 129

 4.7 Requestive strategies = 130

 4.8 A taxonomy of requests = 131

  4.8.1 Requestives, advisories and offers = 134

  4.8.2 Explicit and implicit indirect requests = 136

 4.9 Requests and politeness = 139

  4.9.1 Assertive and tentative indirect requests = 140

  4.9.2 Requests and style = 141

 4.10 Continuation patterns = 142

 4.11 The grammatical analysis of requestive routines = 144

 4.12 Describing request expressions = 145

  4.12.1 Prosodic modification = 145

  4.12.2 Requests and discourse type = 146

 4.13 Indirect requests and speech act stems = 147

 4.14 Types of stem = 148

  4.14.1 Mitigated indirect requests in the form of declarative sentences = 149

  4.14.2 Want and need statements = 154

  4.14.3 Mitigated indirect requests in the form of interrogative sentences = 156

   4.14.3.1 Can / could you = 157

   4.14.3.2 Will / would you = 159

   4.14.3.3 Requests in the form of permission questions = 161

 4.15 Lexical mitigating devices = 163

  4.15.1 Please = 166

  4.15.2 Just = 169

 4.16 Internal and external modifiers = 170

  4.16.1 Requests and external modifiers = 170

  4.16.2 Combinations of modifiers = 174

 4.17 Referential strategies = 175

 4.18 Requests and pragmatic conventions = 177

  4.18.1 Requests and the situation = 178

  4.18.2 Frames for requests = 180

 4.19 Imperatives = 182

  4.19.1 Imperatives and politeness = 183

   4.19.1.1 Do + imperative = 186

   4.19.1.2 You + imperative = 187

 4.20 Patterns expressing offers = 189

 4.21 Conclusion = 195

CHAPTER FIVE : Discourse markers as conversational routines = 200

 5.1 Introduction = 200

 5.2 Coherence and discourse markers = 201

 5.3 Discourse markers characterized = 203

 5.4 The metalinguistic function = 206

 5.5 Relevance theory and communication = 208

  5.5.1 The interpretation of discourse markers in relevance theory = 209

 5.6 The approach to discourse markers in this work = 211

 5.7 The linguistic properties of discourse markers = 211

  5.7.1 'The discourse marker slot' = 212

  5.7.2 Prosodic fixedness = 216

  5.7.3 Positional fixedness = 216

  5.7.4 The grammatical analysis of discourse markers as stems = 217

 5.8 Contextual properties of discourse markers = 218

  5.8.1 Discourse markers as deictic 'pointers' referring backwards and forwards in the discourse = 218

  5.8.2 Discourse markers and person deixis = 220

 5.9 Functional properties of discourse makers 221

  5.9.1 Global and local discourse markers = 221

   5.9.1.1 The pragmatic functions expressed by local discourse markers = 229

   5.9.1.2 Functions of global discourse markers = 226

 5.10 Combinations in the discourse marker slot = 229

 5.11 Discourse markers and cognitive frames = 231

 5.12 Conclusion = 232

Reference = 235

Index = 246



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