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Fairness in international law and institutions

Fairness in international law and institutions (Loan 14 times)

Material type
단행본
Personal Author
Franck, Thomas M.
Title Statement
Fairness in international law and institutions / Thomas M. Franck.
Publication, Distribution, etc
Oxford :   Clarendon Press ;   New York :   Oxford University Press,   1995.  
Physical Medium
xxxvi, 500 p. ; 24 cm.
ISBN
0198259018 (alk. paper)
Bibliography, Etc. Note
Includes bibliographical references and index.
Subject Added Entry-Topical Term
International law --Philosophy. Fairness. Justice.
000 00796camuuu200265 a 4500
001 000000424628
003 OCoLC
005 19970910133325.0
008 950606s1995 enk b 001 0 eng
010 ▼a 95024168
020 ▼a 0198259018 (alk. paper)
040 ▼a DLC ▼c DLC
049 ▼a ACCL ▼l 111063905
050 0 0 ▼a JX1245 ▼b .F73 1995
082 0 0 ▼a 341/.01 ▼2 20
090 ▼a 341.01 ▼b F822f
100 1 ▼a Franck, Thomas M.
245 1 0 ▼a Fairness in international law and institutions / ▼c Thomas M. Franck.
260 ▼a Oxford : ▼b Clarendon Press ; ▼a New York : ▼b Oxford University Press, ▼c 1995.
300 ▼a xxxvi, 500 p. ; ▼c 24 cm.
504 ▼a Includes bibliographical references and index.
650 0 ▼a International law ▼x Philosophy.
650 0 ▼a Fairness.
650 0 ▼a Justice.

Holdings Information

No. Location Call Number Accession No. Availability Due Date Make a Reservation Service
No. 1 Location Main Library/Law Library(Preservation Stacks/B2)/ Call Number 341.01 F822f Accession No. 111063905 Availability Available Due Date Make a Reservation Service B M

Contents information

Table of Contents


CONTENTS
Table of Cases = xv
Table of Conventions & Treaties = xxii
Table of Legislation = xxxv
PART Ⅰ. A CRITICAL ANALYTICAL FRAMEWORK FOR A CRITIQUE OF INTERNATIONAL LAW
 Chapter 1. Fairness and International Law : An Analytical Framework = 3
  1. Maturity and Complexity in International Law = 4
  2. The Post-Ontological Search for Fairness = 7
   a. Legitimacy as Procedural Fairness = 7
   b. Distributive Justice as Fairness = 8
  3. Two Preconditions of Fairness Discourse = 9
   a. Moderate Scarcity = 9
   b. Community = 10
   c. The Existential Movement : Moderate Security and Community Now = 11
  4. The Gatekeepers of Fairness Discourse = 14
   a. No Trumping = 16
   b. Maximim = 18
  5. A Caveat = 22
 Chapter 2. Legitimacy and Fairness = 25
  1. Legitimacy, Community, and the Social Contract = 26
  2. The Indicators of Legitimacy = 30
   a. Determinacy = 30
   b. Symbolic Validation = 34
   c. Coherence = 38
   d. Adherence = 41
 Chapter 3. Equity as Fairness = 47
  1. Equity as Law's Justice : Historical Origins = 48
   a. 'Unjust Enrichment' = 50
   b. Estoppel or 'Bon Fois' (Good Faith) = 51
   c. Acquiescence = 53
  2. The Distinction Between Equity and Ex Aequo et Bono = 54
  3. Equity as a Mode of Introducing Justice into Resource Allocation = 56
   a. Corrective Equity = 58
    (ⅰ) Corrective Equity in Trading Arrangements = 58
    (ⅱ) Corrective Equity in Continental Shelf Allocation = 61
   b. Broadly Conceived Equity = 65
    (ⅰ) Broadly Conceived Equity in Continental Shelf Allocation = 66
    (ⅱ) Broadly Conceived Equity in Conventional Arrangements = 74
   c. Common Heritage Equity = 75
  4. Conclusions = 79
PART Ⅱ. FAIRNESS IN EMPOWERMENT OF PERSONS AND PEOPLES
 Chapter 4. Fairness to Persons : The Democratic Entitlement = 83
  1. Introduction : The Power of Democratic Legitimacy = 83
  2. The Validation of Governance = 85
  3. The Legitimacy of International Validation = 89
  4. Associational Freedom : Historic Self-Determination = 91
  5. Discursive Rights = 98
   a. The Human Rights Declaration and Civil and Political Rights Covenant = 98
   b. Process Determinacy : The Human Rights Committee = 100
   c. Other Systemic Protection of Discursive/Political Rights = 104
  6. Electoral Rights = 105
   a. Post-Colonial Election Monitoring = 105
   b. Enunciating Electoral Democracy = 109
   c. The Future of International Guarantees of Free and Fair Elections = 117
   d. Coherence of Underlying Normative Structure = 121
   e. Renouncing Unilateralism = 130
   f. Treating Like Cases Alike = 132
  7. Peace and the Democratic Entitlement = 134
  8. Conclusion : The Emergence of Democracy as a Global Normative Entitlement = 137
 Chapter 5. Fairness to 'Peoples' and their Right to Self-Determination = 140
  1. Postmodern Neo-Tribalism : An Introduction = 140
  2. Uti Possidetis v. Self-Determination = 146
  3. Legal Antecedents of Postmodern Claims to Neo-Tribal Self-Determination = 147
  4. Confined by Uti Possidetis and Self-Determination = 149
  5. A Post-Colonial Right to Secession? = 154
  6. Redefining the Rules Ⅰ : Focussing on Amelioration = 162
  7. Redefining the Rules Ⅱ : The Effort to Deconstruct the Problem = 168
PART Ⅲ. FAIRNESS AND INSTITUTIONAL POWER
 Chapter 6. Administrative Impartiality as Fairness : The UN Secretary-General's Good Offices and Other 'Third Party' Functions = 173
  1. Introduction = 173
  2. Historical Perspective : Earlier Cases = 175
  3. Some Recent Examples of 'Good Offices' = 180
   a. Some Successes = 180
    (ⅰ) Iran-Iraq = 180
    (ⅱ) Afghanistan = 181
    (ⅲ) Namibia = 183
    (ⅳ) Cambodia = 184
    (ⅴ) Central America = 185
    (ⅵ) Hostages held in Lebanon = 188
    (ⅶ) Russian Relations with Baltic States = 188
    (ⅷ) Mozambique = 188
    (ⅸ) Some Legal Disputes : Libya-Malta and the Rainbow Warrior = 189
    (ⅹ) Guyana and Venezuela = 191
    (xi) Abkhazia = 191
   b. Frustrated Interventions by the Secretary - General = 193
    (ⅰ) Cyprus = 193
    (ⅱ) Western Sahara = 195
    (ⅲ) East Timor = 198
    (ⅳ) Iraq-Kuwait = 198
    (ⅴ) Libya = 199
    (ⅵ) Macedonia = 200
    (ⅶ) Burundi = 200
   C. Joint Ventures with Regional Organizations = 201
    (ⅰ) Somalia = 201
    (ⅱ) Yugoslavia = 203
    (ⅲ) Liberia = 205
  4. Differences in Style and Content = 206
   a. Sources and Limitations of the Secretary-General's Diplomatic and Mediating Authority = 206
   b. The Margin of Discretion = 207
   c. To Delegate or Not to Delagate = 210
  5. Effectiveness = 211
  6. Recent Trends and the Future of the Good Offices Function = 212
  7. Determinants of Success and Failure = 214
  8. How Good the Office? = 215
   a. Institutional Control and Co-ordination = 216
   b. Staff Control and Subordination = 217
 Chapter 7. The Bona Fides of Power : Security Council and Threats to the Peace = 218
  1. A Charter of Limited Powers = 218
  2. Evidence of Principled Standards = 221
  3. Historic Usage : The Easy Cases = 222
  4. The Hard Cases' = 224
  5. Judicial Review? = 242
 Chapter 8. Just and Unjust War = 245
  1. Introduction = 245
  2. Historic Notions of Just and Unjust Wars = 245
  3. The Legal Reformation : the Law in War and the Laws of War(Jus in Bello v. Jus ad Bellum) = 250
  4. The 'Post War' Law Pertaining to War and Warfare = 55
  5. The Charter System : From Collective Self-Defence to Collective Security = 259
   a. Continuity and Innovation : the Move to New Institutions, Processes ; and Sources of Law = 259
   b. The Charter's Law Against War = 266
   c. Norms and Practice Under the Geneva Conventions = 274
  6. Conclusions = 282
 Chapter 9. Collective Security : Sharing Responsibility and Burdens = 284
  1. Introduction = 284
  2. Collective Enforcement Measures Short of Armed Force = 289
  3. The Use of Force in Self-Defense = 292
  4. The Collective Use of Force by the UN = 298
  5. Peacekeeping and Peacemaking = 305
  6. Regional Use of Force = 310
  7. Conclusions = 313
 Chapter 10. Judicial Fairness : The International Court of Justice = 316
  1. Introduction = 316
  2. The Quest for Structural Impartiality = 319
   a. Selection and Tenure of Judges = 319
   b. Disqualification : Countering the Appearance of Bias = 322
   c. Equalization of Influences : The Judges Ad Hoc = 324
   d. Empirical Evidence of Structural Impartiality = 324
   e. Chambers : the Ultimate Recourse = 326
  3. Procedural Fairness = 327
   a. Procedural Aspects of Defining the Court's Jurisdiction = 327
   b Provisional Measures = 332
   c. Rules of Evidence = 335
   d. Complex Facts = 338
   e. Whom the Court Hears = 340
    (ⅰ) Necessary and Indispensable Parties = 341
    (ⅱ) Intervention = 343
  4. Conclusion = 346
PART Ⅳ. THE LAW AND INSTITUTIONS OF DISTRIBUTIVE JUSTICE
 Chapter 11. Law, Moral Philosophy, and Economics in Environmental Discourse = 351
  1. Introduction = 351
  2. An Inventory of Environmental Fairness Issues = 351
  3. The Normative and Institutional Evolution of International Environmental Law = 357
  4. Moral Philosophy, Economics, and Environmental Law = 364
  5. The Unique Role of Law and Lawyers = 372
 Chapter 12. Some Instances of Fairness in Establishing Environmental Normative Systems = 380
  1. Introduction = 380
  2. The Case of Ozone Depletion = 380
  3. Climate Change/Global Warming = 387
  4. Law of the Sea and the Common Heritage Principle = 393
  5. Res Communis in Outer Space and the Antarctic = 399
  6. Other Systemic Approaches to Environmental Fairness = 405
  7. Conclusions = 412
 Chapter 13. Economic Fairness : Terms of Development and Trade = 413
  1. Introduction = 413
  2. Aid Programs = 416
   a. Bilateral Aid = 416
   b. Multilateral Lending Institutions = 418
   c. Multilateral Compensatory Financing = 420
    (ⅰ) IMF's Compensatory and Contingency Financing Facility = 420
    (ⅱ) STABEX = 421
  3. Market Stabilization = 422
   a. Common Fund = 422
   b. Individual Commodity Agreements = 424
  4. Tariff Preferences = 426
   a. The GATT Exceptions to MFN for LDCs = 426
   b. The Caribbean Basin Initiative = 427
  5. Resource Entitlements : UNCLOS Ⅱ = 430
   a. Sharing Sea Resources = 430
   b. Creating New Allocable Commodities = 432
  6. Process Legitimacy : the New World Trade Organization = 433
  7. Technology Transfer = 434
   a. UNCLOS Ⅱ = 434
   b. UNCTAD Code of Conduct on the Transfer of Technology = 435
  8. Conclusion = 436
 Chapter 14. Fairness in International Investment Law = 438
  1. Introduction : The International Law of Foreign Investment = 438
  2. Stability and Change in Fairness Disclosure = 438
  3. A Hypothetical Case = 441
  4. The Nature of an Investment Agreement = 443
  5. Bilateral Treaties in the Fairness Disclosure = 447
  6. Multilateral Treaties in the Fairness Discourse = 450
  7. Human Rights Treaties and Investment Fairness = 453
  8. Fair Standards : Duty and Measure of Compensation for Taking = 457
  9. Taking of Aliens' Property That May Be Unlawful Per Se in Customary International Law = 465
   a. Taking for Non-Public Purpose = 466
   b. Taking Without Due Process of Law = 468
   c. Discriminatory Taking = 470
  10. Conclusions = 472
PART Ⅴ. FAIRNESS ABOUT FAIRNESS : SHAPING A GLOBAL DISCOURSE
 Chapter 15. Forums of Fairness = 477
  1. Fairness' Discourse = 477
  2. Two Characteristics of the Discourse = 478
   a. Equal Voice = 479
   b. Single Voice = 480
  3. Rethinking Structure = 481
   a. Ameliorating the Problem of Formal State Equality = 482
   b. Ameliorating the Problem of Single Voice in a State-Centred System = 482
  4. A Modest Proposal = 483
Index = 485


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