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Historical roots of cognitive science : the rise of a cognitive theory of perception from antiquity to the nineteenth century

Historical roots of cognitive science : the rise of a cognitive theory of perception from antiquity to the nineteenth century (Loan 1 times)

Material type
단행본
Personal Author
Meyering, Theo C.
Title Statement
Historical roots of cognitive science : the rise of a cognitive theory of perception from antiquity to the nineteenth century / Theo C. Meyering.
Publication, Distribution, etc
Dordrecht ;   Boston :   Kluwer Academic,   1989.  
Physical Medium
xix, 250 p. ; 23 cm.
Series Statement
Synthese library ;208.
ISBN
0792303490 (U.S.)
General Note
Includes index  
Bibliography, Etc. Note
Bibliography: p. 227-238.
Subject Added Entry-Topical Term
Visual perception --History. Perception (Philosophy) --History. Cognitive science --Philosophy --History.
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008 890531s1989 ne b 00110 eng d
020 ▼a 0792303490 (U.S.)
040 ▼a 211009 ▼c 211009
049 1 ▼l 412681011
050 0 ▼a BF241 ▼b .M45 1989
082 0 4 ▼a 153.709
090 ▼a 153.709 ▼b M613h
100 1 ▼a Meyering, Theo C.
245 1 0 ▼a Historical roots of cognitive science : ▼b the rise of a cognitive theory of perception from antiquity to the nineteenth century / ▼c Theo C. Meyering.
260 ▼a Dordrecht ; ▼a Boston : ▼b Kluwer Academic, ▼c 1989.
300 ▼a xix, 250 p. ; ▼c 23 cm.
440 0 ▼a Synthese library ; ▼v 208.
500 ▼a Includes index
504 ▼a Bibliography: p. 227-238.
650 0 ▼a Visual perception ▼x History.
650 0 ▼a Perception (Philosophy) ▼x History.
650 0 ▼a Cognitive science ▼x Philosophy ▼x History.

Holdings Information

No. Location Call Number Accession No. Availability Due Date Make a Reservation Service
No. 1 Location Main Library/Western Books/ Call Number 153.709 M613h Accession No. 412681011 Availability Available Due Date Make a Reservation Service B M

Contents information

Table of Contents

I. Introduction.- II. Reconstruction of the history of medieval and (post-) Cartesian theories of perception in terms of the negative heuristics of their respective research programs. Basic epistemological contrasts.- III. The formation of competing optical traditions in early and late antiquity.- (1) The various 'optical' research traditions in early and late antiquity represent rival research programs into the theory of visual perception.- (2) The Aristotelian theory of vision.- (3) The Stoic-Galenic tradition.- (4) The geometrical tradition.- IV. The Identity Postulate at work in various research programs in the theory of vision during late antiquity and during the Arab and European Middle Ages.- (1) The Identity Postulate at work in the Stoic-Galenic theory of vision.- (2) The Identity Postulate at work in the geometrical tradition in the theory of vision.- (3) The Identity Postulate at work in Alhazen's theory of vision.- (4) The Identity Postulate reinforced by the Baconian-Alhazenian synthesis in optical theory. Internal explanations facilitated by the proposed rational reconstruction.- (5) The internal disintegration of the research program defined by the Identity Postulate during the 16th century.- V. The mathematization of physics and the mechanization of the world-picture gradually prepared in the development of medieval optics rather than in that of terrestrial or celestial mechanics.- VI. Mechanicism and the rise of an information theory of perception. A naturalistic reconstruction of (post-) Cartesian epistemology.- (1) Keplerian dioptrics, Cartesian mechanicism, and the rise of justificationist methodologies.- (2) Complete demonstration in science impossible. The need of conjectural theories affirmed.- (3) Ambivalence towards any alleged sources of 'immediate' knowledge. Epistemology founded on an empirical theory of the senses and the mind.- (4) The rise of an information theory of perception. Internal tensions of the representationist research program.- (5) The representationist research program.- (5.1) Descartes against the identity theory of perception. The necessity of an information theory of perception.- (5.2) Two radical consequences of the new theory of perception.- (5.3) The negative heuristic of the Cartesian research program. Dualism of thought and sense. Descartes' information theory not a cognitive theory of perception.- (6) Malebranche and the Cartesian research program into optical epistemology.- (6.1) Ambiguities in Descartes' theory of sensory judgment. Lack of a genuine (cognitive) theory of information processing.- (6.2) Malebranche's theory of visual distance discrimination and of apparent magnitude.- (6.3) Regis contra Malebranche's information theory of perception. Corroborated empirical excess content of the Cartesian program according to Malebranche.- (6.4) Tensions between the positive and the negative heuristic of the Cartesian research program. The negative heuristic at work in Malebranche's theorizing.- (6.5) Rational reconstruction of Malebranche's occasionalism. Divine intervention and the computer analogy.- (7) Conclusion.- VII. Epistemological issues underlying the nineteenth century controversies in physiological optics. The Helmholtzian Program.- (1) The 18th century. Rationalist and empiricist developments. Cross-fertilizations of originally competing programs.- (2) The Helmholtzian research program into the theory of perception. The true logic of discovery revealed by rational reconstruction of the grand movement of intellectual history rather than by 'faithful' intellectual biographies.- (3) The relevance of German Romanticism to the Helmholtzian program.- (4) Helmholtz's theory of subliminal cognitive activity.- (5) Helmholtz's research program contrasted with competing epistemological programs.- VIII. The interplay between philosophy and physiology in Helmholtz's view.- (1) Helmholtz's conception of philosophy in historical perspective.- (2) Muller's Principle of Speci


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