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Semantic interpretation in generative grammar

Semantic interpretation in generative grammar (Loan 30 times)

Material type
단행본
Personal Author
Jackendoff, Ray S.
Title Statement
Semantic interpretation in generative grammar / [by] Ray S. Jackendoff.
Publication, Distribution, etc
Cambridge, Mass. :   MIT Press,   [c1972].  
Physical Medium
xii, 400 p. : illus. ; 23 cm.
Series Statement
Studies in linguistics series ;2
ISBN
0262100134
Bibliography, Etc. Note
Bibliography: p. [387]-394.
Subject Added Entry-Topical Term
Semantics. Generative grammar.
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040 ▼a DLC ▼c DLC ▼d 244002
050 0 0 ▼a P325 ▼b .J3
082 0 0 ▼a 425 ▼2 22
084 ▼a 410 ▼2 DDCK
090 ▼a 410 ▼b J12s
100 1 ▼a Jackendoff, Ray S.
245 1 0 ▼a Semantic interpretation in generative grammar / ▼c [by] Ray S. Jackendoff.
260 ▼a Cambridge, Mass. : ▼b MIT Press, ▼c [c1972].
300 ▼a xii, 400 p. : ▼b illus. ; ▼c 23 cm.
440 0 ▼a Studies in linguistics series ; ▼v 2
504 ▼a Bibliography: p. [387]-394.
650 0 ▼a Semantics.
650 0 ▼a Generative grammar.

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No. Location Call Number Accession No. Availability Due Date Make a Reservation Service
No. 1 Location Main Library/Western Books/ Call Number 410 J12s Accession No. 412233082 Availability In loan Due Date 2021-07-07 Make a Reservation Available for Reserve R Service M
No. 2 Location Main Library/Western Books/ Call Number 410 J12s Accession No. 412651221 Availability In loan Due Date 2021-07-05 Make a Reservation Service M
No. Location Call Number Accession No. Availability Due Date Make a Reservation Service
No. 1 Location Sejong Academic Information Center/Humanities 1/ Call Number 410 J12s Accession No. 151302740 Availability Available Due Date Make a Reservation Service
No. 2 Location Sejong Academic Information Center/Humanities 1/ Call Number 410 J12s Accession No. 452010153 Availability Available Due Date Make a Reservation Service
No. 3 Location Sejong Academic Information Center/Stacks(Preservation)/ Call Number 410 J12s Accession No. 452008383 Availability Available Due Date Make a Reservation Service

Contents information

Table of Contents


CONTENTS
Foreword = ⅹ
Preface = xi
CHAPTER ONE : Outline of the Theory = 1
 1.1 The Problem of Semantics = 1
 1.2 Semantic Representation and the Semantic Component = 3
 1.3 The Katz-Postal Hypothesis = 5
 1.4 On Choosing Between Two Theories = 10
 1.5 Elements of Semantic Interpretation = 14
 1.6 Well-Formedness Conditions on Semantic Interpretations = 17
 1.7 Assumptions about the Syntax and the Lexicon = 21
 1.8 A Remark on Motivating Rules = 23
CHAPTER TWO :Grammatical Relations and Functional Structure = 25
 2.1 The Semantic Insufficiency of Grammatical Relations = 25
 2.2 Thematic Relations = 29
 2.3 Thematic Relations vs. Case Grammar = 34
 2.4 Correlating Thematic Relations with Deep Structure = 36
 2.5 The Thematic Hierarchy Condition = 43
CHAPTER THREE : Adverbs = 47
 3.1 The Approach = 47
 3.2 Some Distributional Classes of Adverbs = 49
 3.3 Problems for a Syntactic Resolution of Adverb Classes = 51
 3.4 The Orientation of Sentence Adverbs = 56
 3.5 Some Syntax = 59
 3.6 Transportability-An Aside = 67
 3.7 Projection Rules for Nonstrictly Subcategorized Adverbs = 69
 3.8 Refining the Projection Rules = 73
 3.9 Subject Orientation, the Passive, and the Cycle = 82
 3.10 S Adverbs and Subject-Aux Inversion = 84
 3.11 Order of S Adverbs = 87
 3.12 Generalization of the Projection Rules to PPs and Parenthetical s = 94
 3.13 Modais = 100
 3.14 Summary = 105
CHAPTER FOUR : Pronouns and Reflexives = 108
 4.1 Introduction = 108
 4.2 Conceptual Advantages = 109
 4.3 Preliminary Statement of the Rules = 111
 4.4 The Environment for Pronominalization = 117
 4.5 The Ordering of Pronominalization = 121
 4.6 Some Problems of Reflexivization = 131
 4.7 The Environment for Reflexivization = 135
 4.8 The Ordering of Reflexivization = 143
 4.9 Some Unexpectedly Bad Cases ofRefiexivization-The So-Called Crossover Principle = 145
 4.10 A Second Thematic Hierarchy Condition = 148
 4.11 Some Unexpectedly Bad Cases of Pronominaiization-The Failure of the Crossover Principle = 159
 4.12 Some Further Cases of Reflexivization = 163
 4.13 Each Other = 168
 4.14 Generalizing Pronominalization and Reflexivization = 174
CHAPTER FIVE : Corefercnce and the Complement System = 178
 5.1 The Problem = 178
 5.2 An Interpretive Rule = 179
 5.3 Examples = 182
 5.4 The Generality of the Complement Subject Rule, Reflexivization, and Pronominalization = 188
 5.5 Interaction of the Complement Subject Rule with Movement Transformations = 197
 5.6 Reflexives, Raising, and Pruning-More Evidence for Condition (B.a) = 203
 5.7 The Behavior of Plurals in Coreference Rules = 205
 5.8 Three Aspects of the Control Problem = 207
 5.9 Networks of Obligatory Coreference = 210
 5.10 When There Is a Unique Controller = 212
 5.11 The Position of the Obligatory Controller = 214
 5.12 Agents Not Conditioned by the Verb of Their Clause = 219
 5.13 Summary = 225
 5.14 Appendix = 226
CHAPTER SIX : Focus and Presupposition = 229
 6.1 Focus and Presupposition in Yes-No Questions = 229
 6.2 Stress Assignment and Focus = 237
 6.3 The Nonsyntactic Basis of Contrast = 242
 6.4 A More Precise Hypothesis of Presupposition and Assertion = 245
 6.5 Association with Focus = 247
 6.6 Negation : Preliminary Account = 254
 6.7 Two Intonation Contours = 258
 6.8 VP-Anaphora = 265
 6.9 Anaphoric Expressions for Presuppositions = 272
 6.10 Inherent Presuppositions = 276
 6.11 Summary = 278
CHAPTER SEVEN : Modal Structure = 279
 7.1 Want Contexts = 279
 7.2 A Solution for Want Contexts = 284
 7.3 The Theory of Modal Structure = 291
 7.4 Some Other Modal Operators = 295
 7.5 The Effect of Modal Operators on Clauses = 310
 7.6 Questions = 314
 7.7 Conclusion = 320
CHAPTER EIGHT : Negation = 321
 8.1 Klima's Rules for Negation = 321
 8.2 Counterexamples to the Katz-Postal Hypothesis = 325
 8.3 Some and Any = 336
 8.4 The Syntax of Negative Constituents = 341
 8.5 A Reinterpretation ofKlima's Analysis = 348
 8.6 Association with Focus Again = 352
 8.7 Neither-rags = 362
 8.8 Proposed Negatives and Inversions = 364
CHAPTER NINE : Consequences for the Transformational Cycle = 370
CHAPTER TEN : Conclusions and Hypotheses = 377
 10.1 The Organization of the Grammar = 377
 10-2 Constraints on Possible Grammars = 379
 10.3 Why Are There Transformations? = 384
Bibliography = 387
Index = 395
Index of Rules Mentioned = 399


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