HOME > 상세정보

상세정보

Economics 5th ed

Economics 5th ed

자료유형
단행본
개인저자
Lipsey, Richard G., 1928- Steiner, Peter Otto , 1922- joint author.
서명 / 저자사항
Economics / [by] Richard G. Lipsey [and] Peter O. Steiner.
판사항
5th ed.
발행사항
New York :   Harper & Row,   [c1978].  
형태사항
xxii, 927 p. : ill. ; 25 cm.
ISBN
0060440163
일반주기
"Portions of this work were first published in the United Kingdom as An introduction to positive economics, [copyright symbol] 1963 by Richard G. Lipsey."  
서지주기
Includes bibliographical references and index.
일반주제명
Economics.
000 01026camuu2200265 i 4500
001 000000109898
005 20040116213047
008 771116s1978 nyua b 001 0 eng
010 ▼a 77015782
020 ▼a 0060440163
040 ▼a DLC ▼c DLC ▼d m.c. ▼d 211009
049 1 ▼l 412342525 ▼l 412342526 ▼l 412342527 ▼l 412445629 ▼l 422334047 ▼f 과학 ▼l 111039832
050 0 0 ▼a HB171.5 ▼b .L733 1978
082 0 0 ▼a 330
090 ▼a 330 ▼b L767e5
100 1 ▼a Lipsey, Richard G., ▼d 1928-
245 1 0 ▼a Economics / ▼c [by] Richard G. Lipsey [and] Peter O. Steiner.
250 ▼a 5th ed.
260 ▼a New York : ▼b Harper & Row, ▼c [c1978].
300 ▼a xxii, 927 p. : ▼b ill. ; ▼c 25 cm.
500 ▼a "Portions of this work were first published in the United Kingdom as An introduction to positive economics, [copyright symbol] 1963 by Richard G. Lipsey."
504 ▼a Includes bibliographical references and index.
650 0 ▼a Economics.
700 1 0 ▼a Steiner, Peter Otto , ▼d 1922- ▼e joint author.

No. 소장처 청구기호 등록번호 도서상태 반납예정일 예약 서비스
No. 1 소장처 과학도서관/보존서고2(서양서)/ 청구기호 330 L767e5 등록번호 422334047 도서상태 대출가능 반납예정일 예약 서비스 B M
No. 2 소장처 학술정보관(CDL)/B1 국제기구자료실(보존서고)/ 청구기호 330 L767e5 등록번호 111039832 도서상태 대출가능 반납예정일 예약 서비스 B M
No. 3 소장처 학술정보관(CDL)/B1 국제기구자료실(보존서고)/ 청구기호 330 L767e5 등록번호 412342525 도서상태 대출가능 반납예정일 예약 서비스 B M
No. 4 소장처 학술정보관(CDL)/B1 국제기구자료실(보존서고)/ 청구기호 330 L767e5 등록번호 412342526 도서상태 대출가능 반납예정일 예약 서비스 B M
No. 5 소장처 학술정보관(CDL)/B1 국제기구자료실(보존서고)/ 청구기호 330 L767e5 등록번호 412342527 도서상태 대출가능 반납예정일 예약 서비스 B M
No. 6 소장처 학술정보관(CDL)/B1 국제기구자료실(보존서고)/ 청구기호 330 L767e5 등록번호 412445629 도서상태 대출가능 반납예정일 예약 서비스 B M
No. 7 소장처 세종학술정보원/사회과학실/ 청구기호 330 L767e5 등록번호 452084266 도서상태 대출가능 반납예정일 예약 서비스
No. 8 소장처 세종학술정보원/보존서고/ 청구기호 330 L767e5 등록번호 452004000 도서상태 대출가능 반납예정일 예약 서비스
No. 소장처 청구기호 등록번호 도서상태 반납예정일 예약 서비스
No. 1 소장처 과학도서관/보존서고2(서양서)/ 청구기호 330 L767e5 등록번호 422334047 도서상태 대출가능 반납예정일 예약 서비스 B M
No. 소장처 청구기호 등록번호 도서상태 반납예정일 예약 서비스
No. 1 소장처 학술정보관(CDL)/B1 국제기구자료실(보존서고)/ 청구기호 330 L767e5 등록번호 111039832 도서상태 대출가능 반납예정일 예약 서비스 B M
No. 2 소장처 학술정보관(CDL)/B1 국제기구자료실(보존서고)/ 청구기호 330 L767e5 등록번호 412342525 도서상태 대출가능 반납예정일 예약 서비스 B M
No. 3 소장처 학술정보관(CDL)/B1 국제기구자료실(보존서고)/ 청구기호 330 L767e5 등록번호 412342526 도서상태 대출가능 반납예정일 예약 서비스 B M
No. 4 소장처 학술정보관(CDL)/B1 국제기구자료실(보존서고)/ 청구기호 330 L767e5 등록번호 412342527 도서상태 대출가능 반납예정일 예약 서비스 B M
No. 5 소장처 학술정보관(CDL)/B1 국제기구자료실(보존서고)/ 청구기호 330 L767e5 등록번호 412445629 도서상태 대출가능 반납예정일 예약 서비스 B M
No. 소장처 청구기호 등록번호 도서상태 반납예정일 예약 서비스
No. 1 소장처 세종학술정보원/사회과학실/ 청구기호 330 L767e5 등록번호 452084266 도서상태 대출가능 반납예정일 예약 서비스
No. 2 소장처 세종학술정보원/보존서고/ 청구기호 330 L767e5 등록번호 452004000 도서상태 대출가능 반납예정일 예약 서비스

컨텐츠정보

목차


CONTENTS
Preface = xiii
Suggested outline for a one-semester course = xix
To the student = xxi
Part ONE The nature of economics = 1
1. THE ECONOMIC PROBLEM = 2
 Economic problems of the seventies = 3
What is economics? = 5
 Scarcity = 6
 Choice = 6
 A classification of economic problems = 9
 Economics : a working definition = 11
Economic analysis and economic policy = 12
 The pervasiveness of policy decisions = 12
 The relation between ends and means = 12
 Conflicts of polity = 14
 Economic and political objectives = 14
2. ECONOMICS AS A SOCIAL SCIENCE = 17
 The distinction between positive and normative = 17
 The scientific approach = 19
 Is human behavior predictable? = 20
 The nature of scientific theories = 22
 What is a theory and how is it tested? = 22
 Economic as a developing science = 25
3. THE ROLE OF STATISTICAL ANALYSIS = 29
 Techniques for testing theories = 29
 The statistical testing of economic theories : an example = 30
 Evaluating the evidence = 35
4. AN OVERVIEW OF THE ECONOMY = 38
The nature of the market economy = 38
 The decision makers = 40
 Markets = 41
 Kinds of economies = 41
How individual markets work : an overview of microeconomics = 42
 The circular flow : from microeconomics to macroeconomics = 44
An overview of macroeconomics = 46
Part TWO A general view of the price system = 51
5. DEMAND, SUPPLY, AND PRICE = 52
The basic theory of demand = 52
 The nature of Quantity demanded = 53
 What determines Quantity demanded? = 54
 The Quantity of a commodity demanded and its own price = 56
The basic theory of supply = 59
 What determines quantity supplied? = 59
 The quantity of a commodity supplied and its own pirce = 61
 Shifts in the supply curve = 62
The determination of price by demand and supply = 63
 The "laws" of supply and demand = 65
6. ELASTICITY OF DEMAND AND SUPPLY = 70
Demand elasticity = 70
 Price elasticity : a measure of the responsiveness of quantity demanded to price changes = 72
 Other demand elasticities = 76
Elasticity of supply = 80
7. SUPPLY AND DEMAND IN ACTION : PRICE CONTROLS AND AGRICULTURAL PROBLEMS = 82
Price controls = 83
 Setting maximum prices = 83
 Setting minimum prices = 88
The problems of agriculture = 89
 Fluctuation and trends in prices and incomes = 91
 Agricultural stabilization and support plans = 97
 Problems with agricultural stabilization and support plans = 99
 American farm policy since 1929 = 100
 Has the farm problem disappeared? = 101
Part THREE Demand = 107
8. HOUSEHOLD CONSUMPTION BEHAVIOR = 108
 The relation between market and household demand curves = 108
The marginal utility theory of household behavior = 109
 Marginal and total utility = 109
 Maximizing utility = 112
 Applying the distinction between marginal and total utility = 115
household choice : an alternative analysis = 119
 The budget line = 119
 Indifference curve analysis = 122
9. DEMAND THEORY IN ACTION = 130
Measurement of demand = 131
 Modern measures of demand = 131
 Problems of measurement = 134
Criticisms of demand theory = 136
 Doe demand theory make unreasonable assumptions about rational household decision making? = 136
 Is demand theory only an elaborate way of saying anything can happen? = 13
Part FOUR Production and cost = 147
10. THE FIRM, PRODUCTION, AND COST = 148
The organization of production = 149
 Proprietorships, partnerships, and corporations = 149
 The rise of the modern corporation = 151
 The firm in economic theory = 152
Cost and profit to the firm = 155
 The meaning and measurement of cost = 155
 The measurement of opportunity cost by the firm = 156
 Profits ; their meaning and significance = 160
11. PRODUCTION AND COST IN THE SHORT RUN = 165
Real choices open to the firm = 166
 Time Horizons for decision making = 166
 Connection the runs : the production function = 167
Short-run choices = 168
 Total, average, and marginal products = 168
 The shape of the marginal product curve = 170
 Short urn variations in cost = 171
12. COST IN THE LONG RUN = 177
 Input decisions in the long run = 177
 Cost curves in the long run = 180
 The relation between long-run and short-run costs = 182
 Shifts in cost curves = 183
 Isoquants : an alternative analysis of the firm's input decisions = 184
13. THE VERY LONG RUN : PROGRESS AND POLLUTION = 192
Progress and productivity = 192
 Productivity = 193
 Sources of increasing productivity = 194
 Invention and innovation = 196
 Past and future productivity growth = 198
Social cost = 199
 Cost to whom? = 200
 Pollution = 200
Part FIVE Markets and pricing = 209
14. PRICING IN COMPETITIVE MARKETS = 210
Firm behavior and market structure = 210
 The significance of market structure = 211
 Behavioral rules for the profit-maximizing firm = 212
The theory of perfect competition = 213
 The assumptions of perfect competition = 213
 Demand and revenue curves for the perfectly competitive firm = 216
Short-run equilibrium : firm and industry = 217
 Equilibrium output of a firm in perfect competition = 217
 Short-run supply curves = 218
 The determination of short-run equilibrium price = 220
 Short-run profitability of the firm = 220
Long-run equilibrium = 221
 The long run in outline = 221
 A more detailed analysis of the long run = 223
15. PRICING IN MONOPOLY MARKETS = 236
A monopolist selling at an single price = 236
 The Monopolist's revenue curves = 236
 Profit maximization in a monopolized market = 239
 Equilibrium of the firm and industry = 240
The nature and extent of monopoly power = 241
 Measuring monopoly power = 242
Price discrimination = 243
 Why price discrimination pays = 244
 When is price discrimination possible? = 244
 The positive effects of price discrimination = 245
 The normative aspects of price discrimination = 246
 Price discrimination : systematic and unsystematic = 247
16. INDUSTRIAL ORGANIZATION AND THEORIES OF IMPERFECT COMPETNTION = 250
Structure of the American economy = 250
 Patterns of concentration in manufacturing = 252
The theory of monopolistic competition = 253
 The theory = 254
 Predictions = 250
 Monopolistic competition after forty years = 258
Competition among the few : the theory of oligopoly = 258
 Developing theoretical models y assuming how firms react = 259
 Generalizing from hypotheses about observed behavior = 260
 Barriers to entry = 262
 Price inflexibility : is there a kinked demand curve? 265
 A final word = 266
17. PRICE THEORY IN ACTION = 269
Boycotts and their effect on market price = 269
 The 1973 meat boycott = 269
 Results of the boycott = 270
The attempt to monopolize perfectly competitive industries = 272
 The instability of producers' co-ops = 273
 Milk withholding in Wisconsin = 273
 The price of haircuts = 275
 The decline and fall of a patent monopoly = 277
Is oligopoly theory necessary? = 279
 Cigarettes = 279
 Steam-Turbine generators = 279
 Mixtures of market structures = 280
18. MONOPOLY VERSUS COMPETITION = 283
Comparisons between monopoly and competition = 283
 The effect of changes in cost on price and quantity produced = 283
 The monopolization of a competitive industry = 285
 Differences in efficiency of competition and monopoly = 285
 The noneconomic appeal of competition = 287
 The effect of market structure on cost = 288
 The incentive to innovate = 289
Public policy toward monopoly : antitrust = 290
 The nature of antitrust policy = 291
 Who makes our antitrust policies? = 292
 The success of antitrust policy = 297
 Economics and the law = 297
Public policy toward monopoly : public utility regulation = 298
 Natural monopoly = 298
 The theory of natural monopoly regulation = 299
 Problems of implementing the theory = 300
 Evaluating public utility regulation = 302
19. WHO RUNS THE FIRM AND FOR WHAT ENDS? = 305
Does the firm manipulate the market? = 306
 The hypothesis that the firm controls the market = 306
 The evidence for the hypothesis = 307
 Doubts about the hypothesis = 308
Who controls the modern corporation? = 311
 The hypothesis of minority control = 312
 The hypothesis of the separation of ownership from control = 313
 The hypothesis of intercorporate control groups = 314
Criticism of the economist's concept of the firm = 314
 Information and the modern firm = 314
 The organization of the firm = 316
 The motivation of the firm = 316
Part SIX Factor Pricing and the distribution of income = 321
20. THE DISTRIBUTION OF NATIONAL INCOME = 322
 Problems of distribution = 322
 The theory of distribution = 325
The demand for factors = 326
 What determines the demand curve for a factor? = 326
 The derivation of demand for factors = 327
The supply of factors = 329
 The total supply of factors = 329
 The supply of factors to particular uses = 333
The price of factors in competitive markets = 335
 Factor price differentials = 335
 Transfer earnings and economic rent = 338
 Policy implications of the distinction between rents and transfer earnings = 340
21. COLLECTIVE BARGAINING, DISCRIMINATION, AND THE DETERMINATION OF WAGES = 344
Theoretical models of wage determination = 345
 A union in a competitive labor market = 345
 A monopsonistic labor market without a union = 346
 A union in a monopsonistic market = 347
Labor market institution = 348
The evolution of the modern union = 351
 Requirements of a successful union = 352
 The historical development of American unions = 353
Methods and objectives of the modern union = 356
 Restricting supply to increase wages = 356
 Competing goals = 358
Discriminatio and wages = 360
 Black-white differentials in labor markets = 360
 Female-male differentials in labor markets = 361
 Economic discriminatio = 362
 Is econimic discrimination possible in competition? = 364
22. INTEREST AND THE RETURN ON CAPITAL = 367
The productivity of capital = 367
 The return on capital = 368
 The value of an asset = 371
The relation between interest and the return on capital = 372
 The demand for additional capital by a firm = 372
 The economy as a whole = 373
 A complication : many rates of interest = 376
Sources of funds for investment = 377
 Financing the modern corporation = 379
 Stock and stockholders = 379
 Bonds and bondholders = 379
 Loans from financial institutions = 380
 Reinvested profits = 380
 Securities markets(stock markets) = 380
 The relation between prices and earnings' = 382
23. POVERTY, INEQUALITY, AND MOBILITY = 389
The distribution of income between rich and poor : the problem of poverty = 389
 Who are the poor? = 391
 Why are there poor? = 392
 Black poverty = 393
 "Waging war" on poverty = 394
 Scope and adequacy of present programs = 396
Is distribution theory relevant? = 398
 Do market conditions determine factor earnings? = 398
 Do factors move in response to changes in earnings? = 401
General criticisms of distribution theory = 403
 The theory restated = 403
 Two important misconceptions = 404
 Does the theory explain the functional distribution of income? = 405
Part SEVEN The market economy : problems and policies = 409
24. THE PRICE SYSTEM : MARKET SUCCESS AND MARKET FAILURE = 410
The interdependent economy = 410
 When markets work well = 413
 How the price system works : the notion of general equilibrium = 414
Market failure = 417
 Sources of market failure = 417
 Coping with market failure = 420
 Pollution control = 424
 Achievements of American environmental policy = 427
25. PUBLIC FINANCE AND PUBLIC EXPENDITURE = 430
Public finance and taxation = 430
 Tax policy and the distribution of income = 431
 Tax structure and the allocation of resources = 436
Public expenditure as a tool of micro policy = 441
 Types of government expenditure = 441
 Coping with the urban crisis = 446
 Evaluating government expenditures = 450
An overview of microeconomic policy = 453
Part EIGHT National income ad fiscal policy = 457
26. NATIONAL INCOME = 458
The concept of national income = 459
 The Spendthrift economy = 459
 The Frugal economy = 462
 The Governed economy = 464
 The Open economy = 466
 The U.S. economy = 468
 Related measures of national income = 473
Interpreting national income measures = 474
 Money values versus real values = 475
 Total output versus per capita output = 475
 Omissions from measured national income = 476
 Which measure is best? = 479
27. WHAT DETERMINES NATIONAL INCOME? = 482
Background to the theory of national income = 483
 Preliminary definitions and assumptions = 483
 National income in the Spendthrift economy = 486
National income in the Frugal economy = 487
 Investment decisions = 487
 Consumption-saving decisions = 487
 The consumption function = 488
 The saving function = 491
 The aggregate demand function = 492
 Equilibrium income = 493
 A link between saving and investment? = 499
A generalization of the theory of equilibrium national income = 499
 The withdrawals-injections approach in the general case = 499
 The income-expenditure approach in the general case = 503
 Equilibrium national income : a general graphical approach = 503
28. CHANGES IN NATIONAL INCOME = 506
Why national income changes = 506
 Movements along curves versus shifts of curves = 506
 A shift in the injection schedule = 508
 A shift in the withdrawal schedule = 509
 Compensating shifts in injections and withdrawals = 512
 An alternative method of deriving the basic predictions = 513
The multiplier : a measure of the magnitude of changes in income = 514
 The definition of the multiplier = 515
 The multiplier : an intuitive statement = 515
 The multiplier : a graphic representation = 517
 How large is the multiplier in the United States today? = 519
Inflationary and deflationary gaps = 519
 The "gaps" defined = 521
 Using the concepts of the "gaps" = 522
29. CYCLES AND FLUCTUATIONS IN NATIONAL INCOME = 525
 The historical record = 525
 Is there a principal cause of cycles? = 526
Shifts in consumption = 527
 Shifts in the relationship between consumption and disposable income = 529
 Shifts in the relationship between disposable income and national income = 532
 Shifts in the consumption function and business fluctuations = 532
Investment and its determinants = 532
 Why does investment change? = 534
 Investment in inventories = 534
 Investment in residential construction = 536
 Investment in plant and equipment = 537
 The accelerator theory of investment = 540
Elements of a theory of fluctuations = 543
 The terminology of business fluctuations = 543
 Cumulative movements and turning points = 544
 The variety in cyclical fluctuations = 546
 Fluctuations : a consensus view? = 548
30. THEORIES AND TOOLS OF FISCAL POLICY = 550
The theory of fiscal policy = 551
 Fiscal impact on the economy = 551
 The effects of taxes and government spending = 552
 Comparative effects of alternative fiscal policies = 557
Objectives of fiscal policy = 559
 Fine tuning = 559
 The removal of persistent gaps = 560
Tools of fiscal policy = 560
 Automatic tools of fiscal policy : built-in Stabilizers = 561
 Discretionary fiscal policy = 564
31. FISCAL POLICY IN ACTION = 569
Fiscal policy at work in the United States = 570 
 Before 1946 = 570
 After World WarⅡ = 571
 Fiscal policy in the future : secular stagnation or boom? = 575
The opportunity cost o government activity = 577
 Effects of alternative means of financing government activities = 578
 The national debt = 581
Part NINE Money, banking, and monetary policy = 589
32. THE NATURE AND HISTORY OF MONEY = 590
The importance of money = 590
 The "real" and money parts of the economy = 590
 The experience of price level changes = 592
 Why inflations and deflations matter = 592
The nature of money = 598
 What is money? = 598
 The origins and growth of metallic money = 600
 The evolution of paper money = 602
 Deposit money = 606
 Near money and money substitutes = 609
 Changing concepts of what is money = 610
33. THE BANKING SYSTEM AND THE SUPPLY OF MONEY = 612
The commercial banks = 613
 Interbank activities = 614
 Commercial banks as profit-seeking institutions = 615
 Reserves = 617
The creation and destruction of deposit money by the commercial banks = 618
 A monopoly bank, a single new deposit = 619
 Many banks, a single new deposit = 621
 Many banks, many deposits = 622
 Excess reserves and cash drains = 624
Central banks = 625
 Basic functions of a central bank = 625
 The Federal Reserve system = 627
 Reserve system = 627
Central banks and the money supply = 629
 Changing the required reserve ratios = 629
 Changes in the discount rate = 630
 Open market operations = 630
34. THE IMPORTANCE OF MONEY = 635
The classical link between the money supply and the price level : the quantity theory = 635 
 The transactions demand for money = 636
 Assumptions of the quantity theory = 637
 Effects of changes in the money supply : full employment = 637
 Effects of changes in the money supply : unemployment = 638
 The modified quantity theory = 638
A modern view of the role of money = 640
 The demand for money = 641
 The speculative motive = 642
 Interest rates and aggregate demand = 645
 How money supply affects national income = 646
 The impact of monetary policy = 647
35. MONETARY POLICY = 651
Objectives ad instruments of monetary policy = 651
 Controlling the interest rate through monetary policy = 652
 Controlling national income through monetary policy = 652
 A conflict between national income and the rate of interest as policy variables = 653
 A conflict between the money supply and interest rates as instrumental variables = 654
Monetary policy in action = 655
 The "accord" = 655
 The shift from interest rates to the money supply as the main target variable = 657
 The use of monetary policy since the accord = 657
 Use of tools other than open market operations = 660
 Monetary policy : some interim conclusions = 664
Part TEN International trade and finance = 667
36. THE BALANCE OF PAYMENTS AND EXCHANGE RATES = 668
The nature of exchange rates = 668
The balance of payments = 670
 The balance of actual payments = 670
 The balance of desired payments = 676
The determination of exchange rates = 676
 Price changes caused by exchange rate changes = 677
 What determines the equilibrium exchange rate? = 678
 Fixed exchange rates = 680
 Fixed versus fluctuating exchange rates = 682
37. THE GAINS FROM TRADE = 685
 Interpersonal, interregional, and international trade = 685
 Sources of the gains from trade = 686
 Additional sources of the gains from trade : learning by doing and economies of scale = 691
 Terms of trade = 691
38. TARIFFS = 695
The nature and purpose of tariffs = 695
 The case for free trade = 696
 The case for protectionism = 696
 Trade versus tariffs = 698
Trade and tariffs in the world today = 704
 Tariffs in the United States = 704
 International agreements concerning trade and tariffs = 705
39. TWENTIETH-CENTURY INTERNATIONAL MONETARY SYSTEMS = 710
Before World War Ⅱ = 711
 The gold standard = 711
 Actual experience of the gold standard = 712
 The 1930s : a period of experimentation = 712
The rise and fall of the Bretton Woods system, 1944-1972 = 713
 The International Monetary Fund = 714
 Problems of an adjustable peg system = 715
 Collapse of the Bretton Woods system = 718
The present system = 721
 Current and future problems = 723
 Survival of the IMF in a world of floating exchange rates = 724
 A final word = 725
Part ELEVEN Macroeconomic policy in action : the control of inflation and unemployment = 729
40. THE NATURE OF UNEMPLOYMENT AND INFLATION = 730
 The goals of macroeconomic policy = 730
Unemployment = 731
 Why policy makers are concerned = 731
 Causes of unemployment = 732
 Tools for control of unemployment = 735
 Experience of unemployment = 735
Inflation = 736
 Why policy makers are concerned = 736
 Causes of inflation = 736
 The control of inflation : validated and unvalidated inflation = 739
 Experience of inflation = 740
41. CONFLICTS AMONG POLICIES : MONETARISTS VERSUS NEO-KEYNESIANS = 742
Views of macroeconomic policy = 742
 Two extreme views = 742
 Monetarist and neo-Keynesian views of stabilization policy = 743
The nature of the problem (diagnoses) = 743
 Cyclical fluctuations = 744
 Inflations = 747
Instruments of policy (the potency of various medicines) = 747
 The influence of interest rates = 747
 Monetary policy = 750
 Fiscal policy = 752
Recommended policies (prescriptions) = 754
 Monetarist policies = 754
 Neo-Keynesian policies = 758
The significance of the debate = 758
42. CONFLICTS AMONG GOALS : UNEMPLOYMENT VERSUS INFLATION = 762
Conflicts arising from various types of inflation = 763
 Demand-pull inflation = 763
 From demand-pull to expectational inflation : the Phelps-Friedman theory = 767
 Implications of the Phelps-Friedman theory = 771
 Cost-push, and price-push theories = 775
Wage-price controls = 776
 Wage-price controls to regulate demand-pull inflations = 776
 Wage-price controls as a cure for expectational inflation = 777
 Wage-price controls to combat cost-push and price-push inflations = 778
Stagflation = 780
 Alternative explanations of American stagflation = 780
 An evaluation of stagflation = 782
Part TWELVE Economic growth and comparative systems = 787
43. GROWTH IN DEVELOPED ECONOMIES = 788
The nature of economic growth = 788
 The definition of economic growth = 789
 The cumulative nature of growth = 790
 Benefits of growth = 791
 Costs of growth = 793
 Growth as a goal of policy : do the benefits justify the costs? = 796
Theories of economic growth = 797
 Growth in a world without learning = 797
 A contemporary view of growth = 800
 Are there limits to growth? 804
44. GROWTH AND THE UNDERDEVELOPED ECONOMIES = 809
The uneven pattern of development = 809
Barriers to economic development = 812
 Population growth = 813
 Resource limitations = 814
 Inefficiency in the use of resources = 816
Fostering economic development = 818
 Planning or laissez fair? = 818
 Educational policy = 819
 Population control = 820
 Acquiring capital = 821
Patterns of development = 823
 Comparative advantage : the case for unbalanced growth = 823
 Agricultural development versus industrialization = 824
 Import substitution = 825
 Industrialization = 826
45. COMPARATIVE ECONOMIC SYSTEMS = 830
Different economic systems = 831
 Ownership of resources = 831
 The decision process(coordinating principles) = 832
 Whose values? = 833
 Incentive systems = 834
 Ends and means = 835
 The characterization of particular economies = 835
The economy of the Soviet Union = 836
 Ownership = 836
 The organization of production = 837
 The distribution of goods and household incentives = 839
 Planning in the Soviet Union = 840
 Prices in the planning process = 841
 Comparative performance : the United States versus the Soviet Unio = 842
The economy of Yugoslavia = 846
 The decollectivization of agriculture = 847
 Labor-managed enterprises = 848
 The scope and role of planning = 849
Comparative systems : a final word = 849
APPENDIXES = 853
Appendix to Chapter 2 MORE ON FUNCTIONAL RELATIONS = 854
 Functional relations : the general expression of relations among variables = 854
 Functional forms : precise relations among variables = 855
 Error terms in economic hypotheses = 855
Appendix to Chapter 3. GRAPHIC ECONOMIC MAGNITUDES = 857
 Graphing economic observations = 857
 Graphing functions = 861
Appendix to Chapter 6 ELASTICITY : A FORMAL ANALYSIS = 865
 Arc elasticity = 865
 Point elasticity = 868
Appendix to Chapter 8 INDEX NUMBERS AND MORE ON INDIFFERENCE CURVES = 869
Index numbers
 Index numbers as summary measures = 869
 Use of index numbers to measure changes in real income = 872
More on indifference curves = 875
 Derivation of demand curves = 875
 The slope of the demand curve = 876
Appendix to Chapter 10 BALANCE SHEETS, INCOME STATEMENTS, AND COSTS OF PRODUCTION : TWO VIEWS = 880
 An example = 880
 An accountant's balance sheet and income statement = 881
 An economist's balance sheet and income statement = 883
Appendix to Chapter 30 THE PERMANENT-INCOME HYPOTHESIS AND THE LIFE-CYCLE HYPOTHESIS = 885
 Variables = 885
 Assumptions = 886
 Implications = 887
 Conclusion = 889
Appendix to Chapter 34 MONEY IN THE NATIONAL INCOME MODEL = 890
 The theory = 890
 An analysis of fiscal and monetary policy = 894
Appendix to Chapter 41 MORE ON MONETARY VERSUS FISCAL POLICY = 896
 The representation of monetary and fiscal policy = 896
 The effects of fiscal and monetary policy = 898
Mathematical Notes = 901
Glossary = 910
Index


관련분야 신착자료

Thaler, Richard H. (2021)
Boudreaux, Donald J (2021)
김인규 (2021)
Mankiw, N. Gregory (2021)
MacKinnon, Danny (2021)
United Nations Conference on Trade and Development (2021)