HOME > Detail View

Detail View

Natural language processing in Prolog : an introduction to computational linguistics

Natural language processing in Prolog : an introduction to computational linguistics (Loan 6 times)

Material type
단행본
Personal Author
Gazdar, Gerald. Mellish, C. S. (Christopher S.) , 1954-
Title Statement
Natural language processing in Prolog : an introduction to computational linguistics / Gerald Gazdar, Chris Mellish.
Publication, Distribution, etc
Wokingham, England ;   Reading, Mass. :   Addison-Wesley Pub. Co. ,   1989.  
Physical Medium
xv, 504 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
ISBN
0201180537 :
General Note
Includes index.  
Bibliography, Etc. Note
Bibliography: p. 473-496.
Subject Added Entry-Topical Term
Prolog (Computer program language) Computational linguistics.
000 00849pamuuu200241 a 4500
001 000000017856
005 19941209112503.0
008 880512s1989 enka b 00110 eng
010 ▼a 88016667
020 ▼a 0201180537 : ▼c ?6.95
035 ▼a 88016667
050 0 0 ▼a P98 ▼b .G38 1989
082 0 0 ▼a 410/.28/55133 ▼2 19
090 ▼a 410.285 ▼b G289n
100 1 0 ▼a Gazdar, Gerald.
245 1 0 ▼a Natural language processing in Prolog : ▼b an introduction to computational linguistics / ▼c Gerald Gazdar, Chris Mellish.
260 0 ▼a Wokingham, England ; ▼a Reading, Mass. : ▼b Addison-Wesley Pub. Co. , ▼c 1989.
300 ▼a xv, 504 p. : ▼b ill. ; ▼c 24 cm.
500 ▼a Includes index.
504 ▼a Bibliography: p. 473-496.
650 0 ▼a Prolog (Computer program language)
650 0 ▼a Computational linguistics.
700 1 0 ▼a Mellish, C. S. ▼q (Christopher S.) , ▼d 1954-

Holdings Information

No. Location Call Number Accession No. Availability Due Date Make a Reservation Service
No. 1 Location Main Library/Western Books/ Call Number 410.285 G289n Accession No. 412693387 Availability Available Due Date Make a Reservation Service B M
No. 2 Location Main Library/Western Books/ Call Number 410.285 G289n Accession No. 412915973 Availability Available Due Date Make a Reservation Service B M

Contents information

Table of Contents


CONTENTS
Preface = ⅴ
1 Introduction = 1
 1.1 The origins of natural language processing = 2
 1.2 The imposition of structure = 5
 1.3 The representation of meaning = 8
 1.4 The role of knowledge = 12
 1.5 The emergence of a new technology = 15
 1.6 Using Prolog for natural language processing = 17
2 Finite-state techniques = 21
 2.1 Finite-state transition networks = 22
 2.2 A notation for networks = 27
 2.3 Representing FSTNs in Prolog = 37
 2.4 Traversing FSTNs = 40
 2.5 Traversing FSTNs in Prolog = 43
 2.6 Finite-state transducers = 50
 2.7 Implementing FSTs in Prolog = 57
 2.8 Limitations of finite-state machines = 59
3 Recursive and augmented transition networks = 63
 3.1 Recursive transition networks = 64
 3.2 Modelling recursion in English grammar = 68
 3.3 Representing RTNs in Prolog = 72
 3.4 Traversing RTNs = 73
 3.5 Implementing RTN traversal in Prolog = 79
 3.6 Pushdown transducers = 82
 3.7 Implementing pushdown transducers in Prolog = 87
 3.8 Advantages and limitations of RTNs = 89
 3.9 Augmented transition networks = 91
 3.10 Some reflections on ATNs = 95
4 Grammars = 99
 4.1 Grammar as knowledge representation = 100
 4.2 Words, rules and structures = 104
 4.3 Representing simple grammars in Prolog = 110
 4.4 Subcategorization and the use of features = 115
 4.5 Definite clause grammars = 127
 4.6 Classes of grammars and languages = 132
5 Parsing, search and ambiguity = 143
 5.1 A simple parsing problem = 144
 5.2 Bottom-up parsing = 145
 5.3 Top-down parsing = 152
 5.4 Parsing in Prolog = 156
 5.5 Comparing strategies = 165
 5.6 Breadth-first and depth-first search = 166
 5.7 Storing intermediate results = 168
 5.8 Ambiguity = 169
 5.9 Determinism and lookahead = 174
6 Well-formed substring tables and charts = 179
 6.1 Well-formed substring tables = 180
 6.2 The active chart = 189
 6.3 The fundamental rule of chart parsing = 193
 6.4 Initialization = 196
 6.5 Rule invocation = 196
 6.6 Housekeeping = 199
 6.7 Implementing a simple bottom-up chart parser = 200
 6.8 Alternative rule invocation strategies = 202
 6.9 Implementing a simple top-down chart parser = 204
 6.10 Search strategy = 205
 6.11 Implementing flexible control = 207
 6.12 Efficiency = 213
7 Features and the lexicon = 217
 7.1 Feature-theoretic syntax = 218
 7.2 Feature structures as graphs = 221
 7.3 Feature structures in Prolog = 228
 7.4 Subsumption and unification = 230
 7.5 The status of rules = 238
 7.6 Implementing PATR in Prolog = 240
 7.7 Chart parsing with feature-based grammars = 248
 7.8 Representation of lexical knowledge = 256
 7.9 Implementing a lexicon in Prolog = 270
 7.10 DAGs versus terms = 273
8 Semantics = 279
 8.1 Compositionality = 280
 8.2 Meaning as reference = 282
 8.3 Translation to a meaning representation language = 288
 8.4 A database query language = 290
 8.5 Computational semantics as feature instantiation = 293
 8.6 Transitive verbs and quantification = 294
 8.7 Ambiguity, preferences and timing = 301
 8.8 Building semantic checking into the grammar = 303
9 Question answering and inference = 313
 9.1 Question answering = 314
 9.2 Evaluating DBQ formulae = 318
 9.3 Standard logical inference = 325
 9.4 Implementing forwards inference in Prolog = 333
 9.5 The pathological nature of logical inference = 339
 9.6 Primitives and canonical forms = 343
 9.7 Classes and inheritance = 347
 9.8 Plausible inference and defaults = 353
10 Pragmatics = 359
 10.1 Ambiguity and levels of language processing = 360
 10.2 Semantic and pragmatic roles of noun phrases = 361
 10.3 Given versus new information = 364
 10.4 Understanding by prediction = 372
 10.5 More controlled versions of prediction = 376
 10.6 Problems with prediction = 381
 10.7 Using discourse structure = 382
 10.8 Language generation as a goal-oriented process = 386
 10.9 Language understanding and plan recognition = 398
Appendix Code listings = 403
Solutions to selected exercises = 469
Bibliography = 473
Name Index = 497
General Index = 501


New Arrivals Books in Related Fields