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A cognitive theory of consciousness

A cognitive theory of consciousness (Loan 1 times)

Material type
단행본
Personal Author
Baars, Bernard J.
Title Statement
A cognitive theory of consciousness / Bernard J. Baars.
Publication, Distribution, etc
Cambridge [England] ;   New York :   Cambridge University Press ,   1988.  
Physical Medium
xxiii, 424 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
ISBN
0521301335
Bibliography, Etc. Note
Includes bibliographical references.
Subject Added Entry-Topical Term
Consciousness. Cognition.
000 00659pamuuu200217 a 4500
001 000000008740
005 19940525113339.0
008 870714s1988 enka b 00110 eng
010 ▼a 87020923
020 ▼a 0521301335
040 ▼a 211009 ▼c 211009
050 0 ▼a BF311 ▼b .B226 1988
082 0 ▼a 153 ▼2 19
090 ▼a 153 ▼b B111c
100 1 0 ▼a Baars, Bernard J.
245 1 2 ▼a A cognitive theory of consciousness / ▼c Bernard J. Baars.
260 ▼a Cambridge [England] ; ▼a New York : ▼b Cambridge University Press , ▼c 1988.
300 ▼a xxiii, 424 p. : ▼b ill. ; ▼c 24 cm.
504 ▼a Includes bibliographical references.
650 0 ▼a Consciousness.
650 0 ▼a Cognition.

Holdings Information

No. Location Call Number Accession No. Availability Due Date Make a Reservation Service
No. 1 Location Main Library/Western Books/ Call Number 153 B111c Accession No. 412919785 Availability Available Due Date Make a Reservation Service B M

Contents information

Table of Contents


CONTENTS
List of figures and tables = xi
Preface = XV
Part Ⅰ Introduction = 1
 1 What is to be explained? some preliminaries = 3
  1.0 Introduction = 3
  1.1 Some history and a look ahead = 4
  1.2 What is to be explained? A first definition of the topic = 13
  1.3 Some attempts to understand conscious experience = 28
  1.4 Unconscious specialized processors : A gathering consensus = 43
  1.5 Some common themes in this book = 64
  1.6 Chapter summary and a look ahead = 70
Part Ⅱ The basic model = 71
 2 Model 1 : Conscious representations are internally consistent and globally distributed = 73
  2.0 Introduction = 73
  2.1 Contrasting the capabilities of conscious and unconscious processes = 74
  2.2 The basic model : A global workspace(blackboard) in a distributed system of intelligent information processors = 86
  2.3 How the theoretical metaphor fits the evidence of Table 2,1 = 89
  2.4 Input properties of the global workspace = 96
  2.5 Output properties of the global workspace : How global is global? = 99
  2.6 Further considerations = 104
  2.7 Testable predictions and counterarguments = 108
  2.8 Chapter summary = 117
 3 The neural basis of conscious experience = 119
  3.0 Introduction = 119
  3.1 The neuroPhysiological fit with Model 1 = 121
  3.2 Extensions suggested by the neurophysiology = 128
  3.3 Recent refinements of the neurophysiological evidence = 131
  3.4 Chapter summary = 134
Part Ⅲ The fundamental role of context = 135
 4 Model 2 : Unconscious contexts shape conscious experience = 137
  4.0 Introduction = 137
  4.1 Sources of evidence on contexts = 139
  4.2 Several kinds of contexts = 151
  4.3 Modeling contextual knowledge = 161
  4.4 Some plausible properties of contexts = 166
  4.5 Implications for empirical testing = 173
  4.6 Chapter summary = 176
 5 Model 3 : Conscious experience is informative - it always demands some degree of adaptation = 177
  5.0 Introduction : Information and adaptation = 177
  5.1 The adaptation cycle : Any learnable task goes from context - creation to conscious information to redundancy = 184
  5.2 Human beings also seek information at many levels = 199
  5.3 Model 3 :Interpreting informativeness in the theory = 203
  5.4 When repeated experiences do not fade : Is informativeness a necessary condition for conscious experience? = 208
  5.5 Implications for learning = 213
  5.6 Some experimental predictions = 219
  5.7 0ther implications = 220
  5.8 Chapter summary = 221
Part Ⅳ Goals and voluntary control = 223
 6 Mode1 4 : Goal contexts, spontaneous problem solving, and the stream of consciousness = 225
  6.0 Introduction = 225
  6.1 The tip-of-the-tongue state as a goal context or intention = 226
 6.2 The conscious - unconscious - conscious(CUC) triad = 233
  6.3 Empirical assessment of goal contexts = 239
  6.4 Goal contexts and the stream of consciousness = 240
  6.5 Further implications = 243
  6.6 Chapter summary = 245
 7 Model 5 : Volition as ideomotor control of thought and action = 246
  7.0 Introduction = 246
  7.1 Is there a problem of volition? Some contrasts between similar voluntary and involuntary actions = 248
  7.2 Voluntary action resembles spontaneous problem solving = 257
  7.3 Model 5 : The ideomotor theory in modern garb = 259
  7.4 Evidence bearing on the ideomotor theory = 267
  7.5 Explaining the voluntary - involuntary contrasts = 273
  7.6 wider implications = 279
  7.7 Absorption and hypnosis as ideomotor events = 287
  7.8 Conflicts between goals = 292
  7.9 Chapter summary = 296
Part V Attention, self, and conscious self - monitoring = 299
 8 Model 6 : Attention as control of access to consciousness = 301
  8.0 Introduction : Attention versus consciousness = 301
  8.1 Voluntary and automatic control of access to consciousness = 305
  8.2 Modeling voluntary and automatic access control = 307
  8.3 Directing attention toward something = 314
  8.4 Directing attention away from something : Suppression, repression, and emotional conflict = 317
  8.5 Further implications = 321
  8.6 Chapter summary = 324
 9 Model 7 : Self as the dominant context of experience and action = 325
  9.0 Introduction = 325
  9.1 Contrasting self and not - self experiences = 331
  9.2 Modeling self and self - concept = 336
  9.3 Further questions to explore = 341
  9.4 Chapter summary = 344
Part Ⅵ Consciousness is functional = 345
 10 The functions of consciousness = 347
  10.0 Introduction = 347
  10.1 Definitional and Context - setting Function = 350
  10.2 Adaptation and Learning Function = 351
  10.3 Editing, Flagging. and Debugging Function = 351
  10.4 Recruiting and Control Function = 352
  10.5 Prioritzing and Access - control Function = 352
  10.6 Decision - making or Executive Function = 353
  10.7 Analogy - forming Function = 353
  10.8 Metacognitive or Self - monitoring Function = 354
  10.9 Autoprogramming and Self - maintenance Function = 355
  10.10 Chapter summary = 356
Part Ⅶ Conclusion = 357
 11 A summary and some future directions = 359
  11.0 Introduction = 359
  11.1 Overall review = 359
  11.2 A brief review of the models = 360
  11.3 What are the necessary conditions for cons experience? = 362
  11.4 Some practical implications of GW theory = 364
  11.5 Topics not covered in this volume = 364
  11.6 Philosophical implications : The mind - body problem revisited = 365
  11.7 Future directions for research and theory = 365
Glossary and guide to theoretical claims = 367
References = 393
Name index = 411
Subject index = 416
Flgure 1.1 The continuum of clear and fuzzy events = 12
Flgure 1.2 The Sporting Experiment : Momentary conscious events may be difficult to recall = 16
Flgure 1.3 The Pani Experiment : Predictable mental images become unconscious with practice = 23
Flgure 1.4 Similarities between GW terms and other widespread concepts = 44
Flgure 1.5 The Sokolov argument : Habituated stimuli are still represented in the nervous system = 47
Flgure 1.6 The standard linguistic hierarchy = 58
Flgure 2.1 Trade-offs to maintain consistency in the Ames distorted room = 80
Flgure 2.2 Conscious experiences are always internally consistent = 82
Flgure 2.3 Model 1 : A global workspace in a distributed system = 88
Flgure 2.4 Some time parameters of conscious experience and recall = 98
Flgure 2.5 The Mind's Senses as a global workspace equivalent = 105
Flgure 3.1 The ERTAS : A neural global workspace? = 124
Flgure 3.2 One possible scenario : Cortical centers competing for access to ERTAS = 127
Flgure 3.3 Model 1A : Some changes in the theory suggested by the neurophysiology = 132
Flgure 4.1 Priming effects : Conscious events increase access to similar events = 141
Flgure 4.2 Presuppositions of the concept of "buying" that may become consciolls upon violation = 150
Flgure 4.3 A significance hierarchy of goal contexts = 157
Flgure 4.4 Modeling contextual knowledge = 162
Flgure 4.5 Model 2 : Contexts compete and cooperate to influence conscious experience = 166


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